Bull Rental Agreement

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by pfettig77, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. pfettig77

    pfettig77 Well-Known Member

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    I've decided to rent out my bull until I need him in July, and I was wondering if any of you have a rental agreement form you could share. Advice (i.e. money and conditions) would also be helpful.
    I'm renting him out really just because if I keep him around here I have to keep 2 herds to avoid my young heifers from getting bred. I'm just learning rotational grazing and I think two herds just makes things that much more complicated. Plus winter chores have to be doubled. It seems to me that having someone else feed and care for him would be good deal for me - almost regardless of what I charge.
     
  2. Gravytrain

    Gravytrain Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't charge anything. For me, as long as he immunizes and has clean, suitable facilities...his feeding him over the winter and eliminating my hassle would be payment enough. The contract should state, however, that if anything happens to the bull, they will owe you $x for your loss. Be sure to establish "x".

    I do wonder if you'll have any takers that want fall calves in northern WI.
     
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  3. pfettig77

    pfettig77 Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering the same thing, but I got an email a few hours after the post from a lady who is very interested and it sounds like they have a nice little operation. I was thinking about not charging or at least very little. Maybe $100 and I'll take my wife out to eat.
     
  4. Hitch

    Hitch Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend who's family owns a small cattle ranch. What they do is barter for the use of their bull. They've found it more beneficial to use the bull in trade for things like home repairs, excavating, etc.
     
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  5. Empire

    Empire Well-Known Member

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    My dad used to rent an Angus bull every fall to breed his first calf Holstein heifers. He would usually get the bull in the fall and return him in the late spring. There was never an exchange of money, Dad just fed the bull and the owner of the bull didn't have to over winter him. Dairy herds that are milked year round usually calve year round as well.
     
  6. G. Seddon

    G. Seddon Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Whatever arrangements you make, just make them in writing and have both sides sign.
     
  7. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Naw, go ahead, you aren't likely to get your bull infected with BVD or Johnes. You sell a breeding bull and their cows don't calve, what then? Your bull comes back and your cows don't catch, what then?

    Best case the bull dies, you want payment of $1000 (market price times his weight). They don't have the money. So, you take your contract to court and win a judgment. Then they still don't have the money and you are out the bull, plus court costs.

    I'd find a farmer that has nice quality, good calving ease cattle. Offer to put a down payment on a young bull that you'll pick up and pay for next August. Then find someone that wants a half of your bull and sell half. If you have freezer space, treat yourself to a side of beef or sell both halves. If you haven't been feeding the bull well and don't want the beef, haul him to auction.
     
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  8. pfettig77

    pfettig77 Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't the best case scenario be that all animals are healthy and all females are bred?
     
  9. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    When my Dad needed a bull to breed his heifers and cows, he just bought one from a guy he knew. Dad kept him around until he was pretty sure most cows were bred, and then had the butcher come and sell the beef.

    I'm sure people would be willing to pay for stud service - they only want to borrow your bull. Depending on the number of cows he will breed - I would charge a certain amount per cow. (Remember, the person getting the bull is getting a good deal - practically free calves!)

    You certainly want a contract, in writing, signed by both parties agreeing to the rental of the bull, a time period, who gets him and delivers him back, what happens if the bull gets sick and needs a vet (who pays), what happens if the bull dies, and what happens if no calves are produced or only some. You also want in the contract that you are NOT responsible if anyone gets hurt by your bull.

    It would seem like it should be an easy deal - someone cares and feeds your bull, in exchange for free calves (and you don't have to bother with him), but there are a multitude of "What if's . . . . . "

    You wouldn't even have to charge money - as has been said - barter for services you need, or perhaps you get a pick of any calf born.

    Just make sure you agree, and the people who rent him agree to everything, so there is no "Well I thought . . . . . . . "
     
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  10. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, that's both the best case and the most unlikely case. There is bound to be a spreader full of unseen, unprepared for drama to deal with.
     
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  11. Empire

    Empire Well-Known Member

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    Good point haypoint.