Bowing out

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Texan, Apr 21, 2017 at 12:15 AM.

  1. Texan

    Texan Well-Known Member

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    This evening I loaded all my breeding stock into the trailer to head to freezer camp in the morning. Maybe someday someone smarter than me will be able to get the premium price to make money, but it wont be me. Taking all the risk and effort to just get back the feed cost is not something I want to do. I enjoyed the animals so it makes me a little sad. On to new adventures.
     
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  2. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    I wonder if part of it is location. I've heard from other people in Texas that it was hard for them to get good niche pork prices. Similarly in some other big livestock areas. Differentiating yourself in a sea of cheap meat becomes more difficult.

    Good luck in your new adventures!

    -Walter
     
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  3. Texan

    Texan Well-Known Member

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    I would say it is almost 100% location, but maybe not so much with the availability of meat as it is regional culture.

    It is not just meat that struggles. Once you get away from Austin, all farmers markets look the same; empty. No customers so no vendors. People are content to just hit up the supermarket for everything. The overall mentality, vibe, culture, whatever you want to call it, is just different. Oh well.
     
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  4. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry your pig adventure is over. Hopefully a new adventure will come your way.
     
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  5. krackin

    krackin Well-Known Member

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    Ossipee Pine Barrens, 5 miles from ME
    Sorry to hear that you are getting out. You know best for your area. Maybe it is just for now. Use what you have learned and apply it forward. I did. Now I can claim that I started with next to nothing and I have every bit of that left.

    Being an ag producer is tough. You don't know how tough until you are in it. Consumers don't believe it though. We don't get enough local support. It is getting better for me to some degree. Real young folk don't know how to cook anything, my senior base is passing on. Young families want good product.

    Best to you. 5 bucks American says you will be back in the biz some day.
     
  6. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    That sure is true here. We have a tiny town with minimal services and have tried repeatedly to get a farmers market going but there are just not enough customers .
     
  7. Forcast

    Forcast Well-Known Member

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    We have a farmer market here. It does real well from people coming from other areas. Costs are too high for most folks in the county. Sad but its cheaper to buy from Food Lion here or a Save a Lot in the next town.
     
  8. barnbilder

    barnbilder Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how it is where you are at, but around here, everybody that wants home grown pork raises their own. As well as pastured poultry and fresh eggs. Pretty much everyone that wants fresh local produce has a garden or has a neighbor with a garden. To compound matters, people fill their freezers with several deer, a few wild turkeys and other assorted woodland bounty. Have seen a lot of people try the farmers market and direct marketing model. It doesn't work everywhere. Some of the places it does work, it only works when you get interns to do all the dirty work and have speaking fees to fall back on.

    Pigs are hard. They eat a lot of food, and that food usually needs to be purchased. If you get in a bind and need to haul them to a sale barn for a guaranteed quick sale, they are worth almost nothing. Niche markets are nice, but to be close to the places that they exist, in most cases your property taxes are going to be a considerable part of your operating expense. Some people raise pigs for a living, I raise pigs to eat. I would have more money if I didn't.
     
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