Bottle lamb lonelynes

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Willowdale, Apr 14, 2017.

  1. Willowdale

    Willowdale Well-Known Member

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    I've got a young ewe who rejected one of twins. I tried harnessing her to the wall but she still kicked the one she doesn't like away. He nursed three times yesterday with me holding her so he got colostrum.

    Today I've started giving him bottles, leaving him with her in the stall. But she protects the lamb she likes in a corner and
    Won't tolerate this one anyone near. When I let them into the pasture he'll for sure be abandoned completely.

    So should I pull him and keep him on the porch? He'll then not bond with sheep, and be lonely. Or leave him with her and hope he can keep close to her?

    Or should I put both lambs in a dog crate with her, so the lambs bond, and maybe she starts thinking of them together?
     
  2. Willowdale

    Willowdale Well-Known Member

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    Following up, the lamb was hungry that one day (second day of life), took 12 oz altogether. This morning (day 3) he wasn't interested in the bottle and tummy is full, so I put them in the pasture.

    The mom is doing a good job keeping the twins together while she grazes, but I notice the skinny one has a tendency to wander off and stand by the fence. He's very bony and scrawny and looks kind of hunched over, even when he runs. His brother is putting on weight like gangbusters and acting perfectly normal.

    I think this lamb may just not be a good doer. And I may have been to quick to blame her for him being "excluded", because he does tend to wander off when his hardier brother stays where she puts him. The fact she got him sorted out even when he ran off into a mob of other, much bigger, lambs indicates she's on her game.

    Anyway, she's feeding him and I hope he catches up.
     

  3. crittermomma

    crittermomma Well-Known Member

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    Did the skinny, hunched one get a BOSE shot? Sounds like a selenium deficiency. I had 2 ewes this year who decided to feed one of their twins, but toss the other twin out of the way when he / she decided to nurse. I tied them both up in tight quarters so the lambs could nurse, but momma couldn't hurt them. I left them that way for over a month until the lambs were ready to eat hay and grass. So far, they are doing OK. One lamb has been pretty much abandoned in the field - but she just runs with other lambs and ewes. So, these two particular ewes will be heading to the sale barn soon. My motto is - you give birth to it - you feed it!!! I will also be taking the lambs as I don't want that type of sheep in my herd.
     
    ShannonR likes this.
  4. Rectifier

    Rectifier Well-Known Member

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    Bottle lambs may bond to their keeper rather than their mother, but they are still sheep. They will do fine in the pasture by themselves once weaned, though they will run to you at first and always will be friendlier than other sheep.

    Tight penning like in a dog crate is asking for the ewe to kill the one she dislikes, I wouldn't do it unless you are putting her in a stanchion.
     
  5. Willowdale

    Willowdale Well-Known Member

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    I've been giving the little one bottles but not letting it follow me. They're on pasture with the rest of the flock, and the little one stays with its mom and twin for the most part. She's not mean to it now, just doesn't want to feed it.

    I didn't give BOSE, and it's not as hunched, but I'll do that if he shows signs of trouble.

    What is weird now is his mom's extra appreciative and friendly with me now, and nuzzles up to me when I feed him. I have a strong sense she appreciates me feeding the little one.

    But yeah, I don't pet it or allow it to follow me. Strictly business, drink till you're full, then back to mom. Sheep belong with sheep!
     
    crittermomma likes this.
  6. Sarah-Louise Sweeney

    Sarah-Louise Sweeney New Member

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    Hey I have a pet lamb that's bloated and I have it some baking soda then some liquid paraffin and still no change. Just wondering is there anything else I could do?? The lamb is four weeks old. Please reply anyone soon thanks
     
  7. Rectifier

    Rectifier Well-Known Member

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    You would get more replies if you started your own thread. Bloated bottle lamb is either harmless or fatal... yeah, I know. Some tend to puff up when they drink but go back down rapidly. Others puff up and then die. It tends to be fatal if it's abomasal bloat as you cannot vent it with a stomach tube like ruminal bloat. Do not try to vent with a needle, as it will cause peritonitis and the lamb will die anyways.

    Try to vent it with a stomach tube and cut back on the concentration of milk replacer you are feeding so it is mostly water. Is the lamb vigorous or would it rather lay down?