Best way to load hogs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Looking4ewes, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. Looking4ewes

    Looking4ewes Well-Known Member

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    My 5 hogs will be going to the butcher soon and I'd like some ideas on how to load them into the stock trailer. They are behind electronet now. I was thinking about herding them into a pen of portable stock panels then moving them somehow into the stock trailer. Should be a riot, no?

    Wendy
     
  2. missythemom

    missythemom Well-Known Member

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    if you have a gate back the trailer up to the gate and fix wire to the trailer for sides.Start feeding them in the trailer for a few days before you want them loaded,they will get use to the trailer,and on the final day put out the feed and shut them in.However not as much fun as wrestling them!
    Good Luck
     

  3. linn

    linn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Feeding them in the trailer sounds like a good idea. If you don't have a stock trailer available to use for a few days, then probably building a portable pen with wings into the trailer would work well.
     
  4. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    My vote is for feeding them in the stock trailer for a few days. Works beautifully for me.
     
  5. deaconjim

    deaconjim Appalachian American Supporter

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    I recommend having someone with a video camera standing by while conducting this procedure. It's always helpful to have an after action review of the process. We'll be glad to help with that. :D
     
  6. Menglish

    Menglish Well-Known Member

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    Best way I've found to load any livestock is to get someone else to do it! LOL

    If not get a hogboard. I've read about them on here and have used them to move my guinea hogs. Works like a charm.

    Mike
     
  7. bee

    bee WV , hilltop dweller Supporter

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    :banana02: Never moved hogs so I have never tried this but was told that a hog will go anywhere for an over ripe banana...
     
  8. cooper101

    cooper101 Well-Known Member

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    Oh, you'll want the video. It'll be one of the funnier things you'll ever watch. Our videos are always a little shaky because my wife is struggling to not laugh so hard she wets her pants.

    An old farm boy that came and butchered one of our pigs recommended doing this: Take a piece of baling twine with a slip-knot. Loop it around the snout, inside the mouth (not including the lower jaw.) Tighten up the knot and lead them around. He swears by it. Never tried it, so I don't know how well it works. Don't know how humane that is, but probably better than chasing them around for an hour.

    If the trailer isn't available for a few days prior, build a sturdy little pen in your pen and feed them in it. Make it so you can easily get them in it with food, block off the open end and then have a way to open it to the trailer and push them in. If they're at all loose, you'll have a real chore on your hands. I tried the special treat thing; they forget about food real fast when they realize you have plans for them.
     
  9. lonelyfarmgirl

    lonelyfarmgirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    feeding them in the trailer is what we do everytime we load pigs. we park the trailer in the pig yard several days in advance and feed them in there. then when the day comes, we simply shut the door. our trailer has an internal gate, so we shut the ones that are going in the internal gate and let the rest out.
     
  10. MissyMoo

    MissyMoo Well-Known Member

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    first time me and the ex-owners of a certain boar hog that was about 200-250 lbs tried to load the tame pet hog into my van, no matter how much food he said he wasnt going in there, so I had to rope him and hold on for dear life until he and I both were exhausted, then he laid down for just a second breathing hard, then the ex-owner of him was given an idea from one of her staff that we wished we had tranquilizers (LOL). so the lady said she had some ACE injectable on hand so she gave him a mild dose of it and he got really sleepy and us 3 women rolled him onto a comforter blanket and grabbed all sides of it and lifted him into the van and soon as I started up the van he woke right up and walked around rooting up the van.....worried me sick he'd destroy it before I got him home. when we got him home I had to rope him and drag him on his side (as he was super stubborn) all the way thru the gate and into the pen - then I took the rope off him and off he went - running around like he'd never been drugged, then he crashed and slept til next day. I had my workout for the day and was just about sick of pigs that day and he was my first pig. LOL.

    I suppose if one could do it the best way would be to back up cage/truck/or trailer to the pen gate and make side pieces (a chute) then chase the hog down or up the chute and into the vehicle. however it would probably be a good idea for two people to guard each side of the chute in case the hog tried to jump it or ram right thru them.
     
  11. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    The easiest way to move hogs is if they are dead.

    To accomplish that, drop some food on the ground, shoot them in the head with a .22 and then stick them in the neck as per hog sticking instructions.

    Once they are dead, you may as well complete the process yourself.

    Seriously, driving live hogs into a trailer that they aren't used to is an absolute nightmare.

    Pete
     
  12. Rogo

    Rogo Well-Known Member

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    The processor comes to us, but I still interact with my pigs to keep them tame and easy to work with. If I walk into a trailer, they'll follow me -- and without any food.

    The processors are funny; they always says my pigs make it difficult to shoot. Why? The pigs stand in front of them waiting for a belly rub! -G-

    When I read what some of you go through, I don't know how you do it.
     
  13. DenMacII

    DenMacII Well-Known Member

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    Our processor comes to our property too. He charges $75.00 per pig. With our last pig he and his adult son went from shot-to-the-head to pulling out on to the road in about a 1/2 hour. It would have taken me most of the day to have two clean 1/2's hanging the way they did. There is also no stress on the animal. The pig went from relaxed in his pasture, to hanging at our butcher in less than an hour. Our butcher is only three miles away, so our meat never leaves town.
     
  14. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    we have used stock panels. Back the trailer to the gate, two panels one on each side and a few folks on each panel, pigs are strong. By withholding food from the day before, going to slaughter right , they are hungry so some food in the trailer and walk behind them with the panels.
     
  15. Looking4ewes

    Looking4ewes Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all your "advice". lol

    I'll try the "feeding in the livestock trailer" trick. However, they will have to jump into it, as it has a swinging door, not a ramp. I've been reading that pigs can jump?

    Wendy
     
  16. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm not a professional hog raiser but When I took my two to the butcher it started out as a fight. Then I remembered what an old guy told me. We put a bushel basket over their head and you can back them anywhere you want to go. Even right onto a trailer. Dangdest thing I ever seen but it works
     
  17. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    yup secret is getting them used to eating in trailer, and than withholding food one day......they'll be waiting on you IN the trailer.

    as for snaring the snout. thats a common practice and no they will not lead around like a dog. they will stand there and scream like your killing them, and you will have to drag them around. wont hurt the hog, but you will be deafened from the god awful screaming, and get a hellacious work out dragin a market sized hog around.
     
  18. Dead Rabbit

    Dead Rabbit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    snaring is only good if you want to tattoo them or put tags in thier ears. they stand stock still and wont move.

    you must use a real snare though and keep back pressure on it.
     
  19. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    Trailer ramp; Slide a pallet or two just under the back end of the trailer. They can use the pallet(s) as a step-up. Try to find pallets that have the cross boards close together so the pigs' feet won't slip between boards and trap or frighten them. With the pallet(s) under the trailer, you won't have anything to move out of the way in order to close the trailer door/gate.
     
  20. Our Little Farm

    Our Little Farm Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm with Pete on this one. Much easier.