besides Maple, what other trees can I tap for syrup?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lunagardens, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. lunagardens

    lunagardens Well-Known Member

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    I have heard friends say their uncle or who ever, taps some other kind of tree to make syrup from it's sap. They said he does tap maple but there is some other kind you can tap to make syrup from.
    Anyone able to tell me what other trees in (Ohio) that I can do this with?
    Thank you for the help.
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Box Elder is really a maple, maybe you are thinking of it? Pretty weak syrup tho, less than a good sugary maple.

    Wikipedia mentions Birtch, but 1/2 the sugar so takes 2x as much collection and boiling so flavors can go off....

    Also mentions Hickory but only in passing & the word 'bitter' is used....

    Ran across this as well:

    WHAT KIND OF TREES? The trees suitable for tapping include all of the maple family: sugar, silver and red maples as well as box elder. Sugar maple sap contains the highest concentration of sugar (2% or higher according to weather conditions and the health of the tree). Box Elder produces a weaker sap, but one which is especially delicious to drink as is, tasting like a slightly sweet spring water. Other species of trees which reportedly may be tapped including walnut, hickories, sycamore and sweet birch.



    I couldn't guess what walnut would give for syrup!!!! Yikes! :)
    --->Paul
     

  3. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    I've heard of people making syrup from basswood sap, never tried it myself.
     
  4. lunagardens

    lunagardens Well-Known Member

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    I agree, hickory just sounds blah.LOL. I do believe it was the box elder they were speaking of. I have heard others mention a different tree and the name never stuck. Most likely because when I hear elder I think of the nasty tree borer gug which has caused alot of tree diseas/death in our state.
    Thank you for the information. I am still groggy from an operation a few days ago which makes it hard to properly focus and think on some things.
    It was bothering me I could not recall the kind of tree and knew I would find an answer here.
    Thanks again~
     
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  5. wogglebug

    wogglebug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Definitely birch, but it's more dilute than maple.
     
  6. kreig

    kreig Well-Known Member

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    I get poplar and hickory syrup from Lehmans occasionaly( it's kind of pricy). I think the poplar is too sweet but(despite you skeptics ;) )I LOVE the hickory. It is by far my favorite! It is kind of smokey tasting. I have a friend who taps for syrup( we are also in Ohio) and he says you can tap pretty much any native tree it is just that most don't produce much sap.
     
  7. Oldcountryboy

    Oldcountryboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've heard the old timers around here use to tap Hackberry trees to make syrup out of. There's plenty of them all up and down the creeks around here.
     
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  8. omnicat

    omnicat Well-Known Member

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    I've also heard of elm and walnut.

    They're all going to have their own flavors, and many need more sap per syrup unit because the sugar content isn't as high.

    I haven't tried any less-usual trees except Silver Maple (since I have a giant one 20 steps from my back door). I can attest it made fabulous syrup. If there was a difference in taste at all - it might have be slightly lighter than "regular" maple syrup. But that would also depend on the grade of sugar maple you were comparing it to. It seemed the same to me.
     
  9. Happy7Farm

    Happy7Farm FKA: Ripcat Ranch

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    The syrup you get from the hickory tree is not from tapping it, it is from cooking the bark some special way. That is why it has a smoky taste. We make a little maple syrup(5-10 gal) for our family and if we have extra sell some here in Central Kentucky. When we lived in Maine we tried Birch but did not turn out so good. Will stick to the good 'ol Sugar Maple!
     
  10. Rob30

    Rob30 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Any more info on the poplar syrup? I have acres of poplar trees.
     
  11. PlowGirl

    PlowGirl Well-Known Member

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    I believe that you could actually tap sap from a Hickory tree. I've got smooth bark hickories here, and when I cut them in late winter, the sap tastes sweet.

    It's going to sound sacreligous but, I don't care for the taste of maple syrup. Growing up on corn syrup syrup has ruined me.
     
  12. blooba

    blooba Well-Known Member

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    I've tried to tap the corn stalks but didn't have any luck :hysterical:
     
  13. Happy7Farm

    Happy7Farm FKA: Ripcat Ranch

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    When we lived in Maine we did not have any Sugar Maples we had to tap Red Maples and it took 60 gallons of sap to make a gallon of syrup compared to about 40 gallons of sap from a Sugar maple. These other trees would most likely need a whole lot more sap than that to make a gallon of syrup, like the Birch syrup they make up in Alaska takes 100 gallons to make a gallon. To much boiling for me!
     
  14. fatrat

    fatrat Well-Known Member

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    I've read that some of the indians would tap elm but there is not much elm left these days.