Aspirin for Tomatoes?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Shinsan, Jul 9, 2007.

  1. Shinsan

    Shinsan Keeping the Dream Alive

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    Watched a gardening program on TV recently, which featured the garden of a Greek lady who was growing every vegetable she needed. She had a terrific crop of tomatoes, and revealed her secret: Prior to planting out her home raised seedlings, she spread out and raked in a good handful of ASPIRIN.
    The show's presenter was amazed, and at a complete loss to explain why the aspirin appeared to be so beneficial - the old lady couldn't explain either.
    I, usually a mine of totally useless information, am completely stumped on this one.
    Can anyone provide a clue as to why this should be so?
     
  2. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Is calcium the binder in asprin? I've wonder a little about using tums
     

  3. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    My mom used to put aspirin in a vase when she put cut flowers in it. She said it kept them perky and fresh longer, and kept them from wilting.
     
  4. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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  5. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if one took willow shoots and ground them up to use as a mulch if that would have a good effect on plants. There is natural salicyclic acid in willow.
     
  6. Shinsan

    Shinsan Keeping the Dream Alive

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    WY White Wolf,
    Thank you very much for that link!

    I've printed out the information and put it in my gardening file so that I can show people that I'm not completely nuts.
     
  7. Betho

    Betho Well-Known Member

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    would probably be worth experimenting... I bet it would work.
     
  8. naturewoman

    naturewoman Well-Known Member

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    I can't thank you all enough. I'm putting together a notebook of gardening hints from this site. I love all the information and questions and answers brought up here.
     
  9. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    interesting idea. i wish i had more willow now...i used a whole bunch of willow mulch from two culled trees in other locations. i have a few branches left and may add it to the compost heap.
     
  10. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Your welcome.

    My searching also found out that Tums will work for prevention of blossum end rot. Just grind up a couple and sprinkle around the plant.

    My be wrong, but I thought Asprin was made only from the bark of the willow.
     
  11. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Meloc,
    There's so much willow and alder here it's like weed, but it has good function for wet places. I've been mowing a field lately that I cut down willows last fall and this spring. New shoots come up where I've mowed, and they are part of the garden mulch. Whether that makes any difference, I don't know. :shrug:
    I should experiment a bit and place some shredded willow shoot mulch around some plants to see if it's helpful or not. Maybe the 'sick' ones after all the heavy rains! Can't hurt to try. :shrug:
     
  12. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    That's right. It's made from the fleshy insides of the bark. I use willow tips in a rooting compound though. I think there's a lot about willow we still don't know.
     
  13. Triffin

    Triffin Well-Known Member

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    Glad I read this thread :)

    I'm in the process of rooting some laterals
    I trimmed from my tomato plants so I just
    crushed a couple of asprin and mixed some
    in their water .. I plan to stick them in the ground
    this weekend and will use the remaining asprin
    water then ..

    Triff ..
     
  14. naturewoman

    naturewoman Well-Known Member

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    Are you saying you can pick laterals off the main plant and start them to root on their own? I tossed mine when I picked them. If I can root them, I'll try that next time. Will rooting compound help, along with the aspirin?
     
  15. thechickenladyx

    thechickenladyx Thechickenladyxx

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    ive used epsom salt with each seedling, and it actually works.
     
  16. naturewoman

    naturewoman Well-Known Member

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    I have a question about the epsom salts...I've been reading about using them here, but I thought salt killed plants...how much do you use, and why doesn't it kill the plants. I know it's not the same as sodium, but isn't it still salt?
     
  17. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Indeed, you are wrong! Willows contain salicylic acid and was never a source for Aspirin. Aspirin is synthetic acetylsalicylic acid which is found in a number of shrubs. The "a" is for for acetyl while "spirin" is for spirea, the natural source of acetylsalicylic acid. Hence the trade name Aspirin. The Aspirin that you buy from drug stores is not remotely connected to any trees or spirea but is a byproduct of coal!

    Martin
     
  18. thechickenladyx

    thechickenladyx Thechickenladyxx

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    but the inner bark of the willow tree was used by the native peoples of this country, for aches and pains, as well as bringing a fever down. so it has some properties that aspirin has.

    i dont know why epsom salts work, they must be a different salt then we know. but they do. salt is afterall a mineral.

    by the way, salt bath is what works best again the cabbage moth, and doesnt harm the plant. they are originally from the cliffs over oceans, and were sprayed regualarly.

    a little trivia

    jesse
     
  19. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    regarding willow bark and the use of it as an analgesic would make sense if it contains salicylicates (or acetylsalycylic acid) as the natural chemical. Aspirin is a syntesized form, and as Martin posted isn't remotely associated with being made from willow.

    Epsom salt is a natural mineral of magnesium sulfate. The word 'salt' doesn't pertain to anything like sodium chloride as in table or rock salt.
    The element that is taken up for plants from epsom salt is magnesium.
     
  20. naturewoman

    naturewoman Well-Known Member

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