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  #1  
Old 01/25/13, 09:00 AM
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Article on "Hoarding" for emergencies

Just saw this when I was checking my email. I'm offended by the word "hoarding" - as if having supplies to be self sufficient in an emergency is some kind of mental illness. But at least it's more fashionable now to "prep". And I'd like to point out that milk jugs aren't good for water storage - they disintegrate over time, and it's very hard to get all the milk out. Soda bottles are fine. And they should have mentioned that fuel should never be stored IN your home - if there's a fire, BOOM. And they should have mentioned that people should have some basic first aid supplies in case someone is injured in the hurricane/tornado or while snowed in.

Quote:
4 Things to Hoard for an Emergency
Whether it's a fast-moving summer thunderstorm, a blizzard that leaves power lines coated in ice or a hurricane with whipping winds, you can unexpectedly lose power in your home.

How long will it be until it's restored? If it's longer than a few hours, being prepared can make all the difference in how your family fares.

All State Insurance and Lisa Bedford, author of "Survival Mom: How to Prepare Your Family for Everyday Disasters and Worst Case Scenarios," teamed up to provide a list of the top four items you should hoard now so you're prepared for an emergency later.

The four basic emergency supplies every family needs:
1. Fuel
There are three types of fuel you should keep on hand:
Gasoline or diesel fuel, safely stored in five-gallon containers, to power a generator; Propane for a propane-powered grill; Supply of seasoned wood to be used in a fireplace, wood-burning stove or cooking over a campfire.

2. No-Cook Foods
Store emergency foods in your pantry that do not require refrigeration, including canned tuna fish, dried fruit, granola bars, peanut butter, jerky, pudding cups, seeds and nuts, packets of instant milk and V-8 juice. In addition, make sure you have a manual can opener.

3. Light Sources and Batteries
Keep a supply of flashlights on hand, including headlamps and lanterns. Be sure to stock up on batteries. Tip: LED batteries provide the longest life. Candles can also be used as a light source, but do be careful around the open flames.

4. Water
Whether you rely on well water or municipal water, a power outage can sometimes affect your access to clean water. Do keep bottled water on hand to be used for drinking, cooking, sanitation and bathing. The inexpensive way to do this is to thoroughly wash 2-liter soda bottles or plastic milk jugs and fill them with plain tap water.

--From the Editors at Netscape
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Last edited by Mom_of_Four; 01/25/13 at 09:04 AM.
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  #2  
Old 01/25/13, 11:22 AM
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The trouble with storing no cook foods in the pantry is that families tend to deplete the stores with no emergency in sight. If you keep replacing these things, soon your family is eating way too much snack food. I try to keep home canned meals on hand that only require heating, and these are rotated thru our regular menu. I also try to keep bread baked ahead and in the freezer. I keep a means of cooking quick meals in case the power is out too. It really doesn't take that long or that much energy to cook something healthy.

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  #3  
Old 01/25/13, 07:30 PM
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My dander also gets up, when ignorant people bandy the 'hoarding' label around. It's not hoarding, if one acquires anything, before a shortage.

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Old 01/25/13, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texican View Post
My dander also gets up, when ignorant people bandy the 'hoarding' label around. It's not hoarding, if one acquires anything, before a shortage.
I've always considered hoarding to be keeping useless junk all over the place. Piles of old stuff laying around.
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Old 01/26/13, 02:02 AM
 
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Originally Posted by terri9630 View Post
I've always considered hoarding to be keeping useless junk all over the place. Piles of old stuff laying around.
Hoarders keep garbage too. And it isn't stored, it just lays in piles all over the floor and house.
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  #6  
Old 01/26/13, 02:46 AM
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On ready to eat foods? I consider all my canning that way. You can eat soup cold, venison cold, crab cold, veggies cold, fruit cold, and all kinds of other pre-prepared canned foods. OR, you can heat most of the aforementioned. I cook from scratch most of the time, but find it very convenient to be able to go shopping through my own pantry. I figured out how many jars were needed in each category for a year, so that is what my goal is. Now, keep in mind, there are seasons for gardening/harvesting, the orchard fruit, crabbing, fishing, shrimping, hunting, and foraging mushrooms. If one's goal is 1 year of every category, variety inclusive (makes it more enjoyable), then rotating is all one has to do, since there is always an abundance! An example:

This past year, I had a lot of apples, so I preserved them in different ways. I dehydrated some, made applesauce, apple cider, apple pie filling, and apple butter. Just that category worked out so well, I am going to widen the variety even more in that and other categories.

Plums? Dried plums, plum sauce, plum sauce with raisins, plum juice, plum chutney, and canned plums.

Since DH didn't want to change the Propane Tank over, I just cooked dinner on our wood stove.

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  #7  
Old 01/26/13, 06:35 AM
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Why are we storing propane for a grill if the food needs no cooking? You gotta take these suggestions for what they are, just a prod in the right direction. I suspect the author did minimal research to produce the required info in the shortest possible time.

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  #8  
Old 01/26/13, 09:23 AM
 
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It would have been better to use the term "stock up" rather than "hoarding". But her advice is pretty lacking, IMO.

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  #9  
Old 01/26/13, 10:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyngbaeld View Post
The trouble with storing no cook foods in the pantry is that families tend to deplete the stores with no emergency in sight. If you keep replacing these things, soon your family is eating way too much snack food. I try to keep home canned meals on hand that only require heating, and these are rotated thru our regular menu. I also try to keep bread baked ahead and in the freezer. I keep a means of cooking quick meals in case the power is out too. It really doesn't take that long or that much energy to cook something healthy.
Canned meals are a no-cook food. They can be eaten cold, though most taste better warm. I think most of what they listed as junk food as well. Jerky and such is more for camping, snacking and beer munchies. Ready made meals are less likely to be opened and eaten out of boredom. For camping and true emergencies, I've heard of people telling you to pack dog kibble. It'll sustain you in a true emergency, but most people won't eat it out of boredom, lol.
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  #10  
Old 01/26/13, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mekasmom View Post
Hoarders keep garbage too. And it isn't stored, it just lays in piles all over the floor and house.
I suppose I'm a definite hoarder then. Even now, I have three or four boxes of just strips of bubble wrap for shipping eggs. I will even trash pick and make use of others' garbage on a very regular basis... buckets, spent grain from the brewery, their grain bags, egg cartons from the prison. All garbage, but that garbage saves me over $50 per month. I guess if all that garbage makes me a hoarder, then I'm proud to be a hoarder.

Hence why I hate labels! Labels are stupid, generic terms to define thousands of different definitions.
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  #11  
Old 01/26/13, 11:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettacreek View Post
I suppose I'm a definite hoarder then. Even now, I have three or four boxes of just strips of bubble wrap for shipping eggs. I will even trash pick and make use of others' garbage on a very regular basis... buckets, spent grain from the brewery, their grain bags, egg cartons from the prison. All garbage, but that garbage saves me over $50 per month. I guess if all that garbage makes me a hoarder, then I'm proud to be a hoarder.

Hence why I hate labels! Labels are stupid, generic terms to define thousands of different definitions.
May I ask what you do with the grain bags? Very smart to go to these kind of companies.. i should be trying to be more inventive in other man's garbage
A couple of years ago, the neighbor threw out some kind of plastic bags from the Royal Mail. I have used them for so many things: moving bags, planted a garden in it
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  #12  
Old 01/26/13, 11:54 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Groene Pionier View Post
May I ask what you do with the grain bags?
You can sew them into a very simple tote bag with a few stitches and make $40 a bag, from what I saw at the Northeast Equine Expo in Springfield MA.
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  #13  
Old 01/26/13, 12:40 PM
 
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I may have to start picking out my chicken feed bags based on their designs!

I hate the word hoarding as well, but "they" use it interchangably with prepping.

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  #14  
Old 01/26/13, 01:00 PM
 
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You can use them for just about anything, very heavy duty garbage bags, those tote bags someone mentioned, tarps, feed storage for local grain purchases, grain fermenting bags (instead of a drilled bucket inside another, just use a feed bag inside of a bucket), bird or small animal transport, and I'm going to experiment with using them for mass grain sprouting and fodder. Could even resize them for smaller scale sprouting, if it works as well as I hope.

I suppose I save more than $50/month on garbage, not even counting "one time purchases", including a brand new turkey fryer and stand, worth about $80 at the store. Oh, plus we use the waste from the planing they do at the prison. It makes nice shavings, and we get them for free. That there is $10-$20/month alone in savings.

So, people can laugh all they want about what they consider hoarders, cheap asses, preppers, homesteaders, garbage pickers, etc. Our income is in the six digits, and unless you catch me asking for garbage or whatever, you'd never guess the kind of things I do, but I guarantee you that our income is good, and stretched further than most, and we live wonderful lives! I enjoy the thrill of saving money. It's as much of a hobby and entertainment for me as folks who go on shopping sprees and spend $100-$200 in an hour at the mall. Plus, I never have buyer's remourse.

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  #15  
Old 01/26/13, 04:02 PM
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Plastic or woven feed sacks make good sand bags. "Hoard" them for an expedient fall out shelter.

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  #16  
Old 01/26/13, 04:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyngbaeld View Post
Plastic or woven feed sacks make good sand bags. "Hoard" them for an expedient fall out shelter.
They're also great for adding weight to a pick-up, or any car on slippery roads. My wife has about 400 pounds in the very back of her Silverado.
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Old 01/26/13, 04:55 PM
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what's an "LED battery"?

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  #18  
Old 01/26/13, 09:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyngbaeld View Post
Plastic or woven feed sacks make good sand bags. "Hoard" them for an expedient fall out shelter.
Oh, I REALLY like this idea! What a great use for all that bale twine, too - to tie the sandbags shut.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oakridgewi View Post
what's an "LED battery"?
LOL, you caught that one, too? I know they were probably trying to say LED lights make the best use of batteries, but that sure wasn't what they actually said.

Overall, that was one horribly written article, above and beyond the whole "hoarder" thing.
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Old 01/27/13, 03:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by manygoatsnmore View Post
Oh, I REALLY like this idea! What a great use for all that bale twine, too - to tie the sandbags shut.


LOL, you caught that one, too? I know they were probably trying to say LED lights make the best use of batteries, but that sure wasn't what they actually said.

Overall, that was one horribly written article, above and beyond the whole "hoarder" thing.
I have to agree.....

Loose use of slang term the author had little understanding of, especially since the author was in essence writing a" hoarding" article.

Very little information value at all and from the whole thing just a general lack of concern or pride in thier work......

Either....

A....was insulted to have to do the article
B...not really that good at it
C....thought they actually did a good job at it

I however applaud the overall idea that they did write a article, no matter how poorly, that might inspire some one to do something
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  #20  
Old 01/27/13, 01:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ross View Post
Why are we storing propane for a grill if the food needs no cooking? You gotta take these suggestions for what they are, just a prod in the right direction. I suspect the author did minimal research to produce the required info in the shortest possible time.
No cook food is only one part of food storage. Having no cook food, easily cooked food and longer cooking food is a balance in food storage.

Judy
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