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  #1  
Old 10/29/12, 10:44 AM
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Join Date: May 2002
Location: GA & Ala
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Propane fireplace, how good are they?

Well I live in DH's house now and my wood stove and wood heater are at the farm. I was thinking about power outages yesterday and realized that our house is totally electric, except for a propane fireplace.

It has those fake logs and the "fire" doesn't really go up a chimney, it has a fake fireplace mantle on one side of the wall that "looks" like a chimney, but really isn't. so I guess I would call it a heater disguised as a fireplace - lol..

How good are these at heating if the power goes out and it is ALL you have for heat?

I am going to call today to get prices on propane for those bottles. they look to hold about 50 gallons of propane? and sit upright.

DH had never thought about it before I asked, and when I did ask he said" why we will go to a hotel I guess". , dear unenlightened one, we will not go to a hotel when we can use this heater thing." Some days I just wonder if the entire subdivision (minus the one guy with a wood stove) just evacuates to the nearest hotel?

Don't get me wrong, I love DH but I am NOT used to staying in a hotel when I have a perfectly good house to stay in. (once I get it in "survive w/o electric" mode.)

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  #2  
Old 10/29/12, 11:15 AM
NJ Rich
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Springsteen Area of New Jersey
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I don't have very much info about propane fireplaces and the logs. I do know some require electric to light???

My wood burning fireplace lights with a match and I have wood. The fire place has never let me down. LOL

Propane and natural gas logs are for convieniance and mood lightening not very much for heating. You need to be a lot closer to a gas log fireplace than wood stove or wood burning fireplace. When I burn my fireplace you can sit across the room and feel "very warm if not hot".

Propane is expensive and when you run out you haqve no heat. With this huge storm hitting us If I had a farm with wood stoves that is where I would be now.

I hope you are well ansd safe. NJ Rich

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  #3  
Old 10/29/12, 11:35 AM
 
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Location: VA
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We have one of these in our house. When we bought the house the propane company had to do an inspection. The propane guy said the fireplace was just for show, it won't do much for heat and it goes through propane really fast. He said to turn the propane off to it and only use it to look pretty on Thanksgiving and Christmas. So I wouldn't depend on it for a heating source.

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Old 10/29/12, 12:24 PM
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Thanks for the information, I will see if it has a electric connection to light it or something. Have no clue as I have only dealt with wood. I will investigate another source to heat with, I had a feeling that this type of "fireplace" was not the best thing going.

I sure miss my wood stove!

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  #5  
Old 10/29/12, 12:35 PM
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We have propane log fireplace (which requires electric to turn on) once it is on for a while (like and hour) its good to go and the heat travels upstairs as it is in the room close to those stairs.

Anyway, we have kerosene for back up when electric goes out. We really do want a real fireplace and a cook stove.

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  #6  
Old 10/29/12, 12:58 PM
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: SW CO
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We live in a mobile and also have a woodstove in our livingroom. Where our master bedroom is however is always cold. We installed one of these:

ProCom Vent-Free Dual Fuel Stove — 23,000 BTU, 850 Sq. Ft. Heating Area, Model# PCSD25RT | Dual-Fuel: Gas Propane| Northern Tool + Equipment

I am so glad we did. We set the thermostat to come on at a certain temperature and it warms up fast and steady. Just something to consider

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  #7  
Old 10/29/12, 01:12 PM
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We have a gas fireplace for backup to our woodstove. I do not like to leave the house and my dogs with the woodstove going. No big deal cause I'm a homebody.

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Old 10/29/12, 10:53 PM
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Our fire place had been converted to propane and I hated it. I had a fireplace sales guy come out to give an estimate to replace it. He started looking at it (insert) and told me to hold on. He called his office with the model number and said it was an either/or box. He checked the chimney to make sure it was the right size and in good shape and pulled the propane stuff out, took care of the hole for the propane feed and wala! Wood burning fire place.

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  #9  
Old 10/30/12, 02:44 AM
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They do a pretty good job of heating one or two rooms.

Most have Piezo electric ignition where you either turn a knob or press a button to make a spark to light the pilot

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  #10  
Old 10/30/12, 04:39 AM
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Our house came with a propane ventless fireplace, and it works just fine to heat a room or two. I would love a wood stove, but until we can get one the propane fireplace is our emergency heat source. We only use it on holidays, but plan to sleep in that room with sleeping bags if the power goes out in winter. If we had really cold weather I'd set up the kerosene heater or use the gas oven in the kitchen to keep the pipes from freezing.

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  #11  
Old 10/30/12, 06:14 AM
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We bought one to heat the livingroom of our 103 year old 2 story farmhouse because the heat from the pellet stove didn't really keep it warm. We soon found that the gas logs on the low setting heated the entire 1900+ sq ft house most of the time. It used much less gas than our forced air furnace. The ignition uses an electric spark that is generated by the ignitor itself, so it requires no other power source. Since we put it in, we have rarely had to use any other source of heat.

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  #12  
Old 10/30/12, 07:04 AM
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I am going to get a small bottle of propane and figure out how to light this fireplace. I do not see any buttons or switches to push for the ignitor. The gas line runs outside to the side of the house.

Where would an ignition switch be located? I have looked all around the fireplace, on the walls, and down near the "logs".

Thanks!! and Thanks to all who have responded. I am real "country" when it comes to modern conveniences. I have lived with a wood heater for the past 26 years and have not dealt with anything like this before. I also had no clue how to turn on the a/c as I lived without an a/c unit for those same 26 years.

When you get used to doing things the "old fashioned" way, turns out you can adjust to no a/c and no electric heat just fine. lol..

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  #13  
Old 10/30/12, 07:38 AM
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On mine, the control knob is at the bottom front on the right, and the ignitor button is on the left side.

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  #14  
Old 10/30/12, 07:39 AM
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Virginia
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When we bought our house (subdivision) the previous owner had converted the wood burning fireplace to propane gas log (?). It is the COLDEST darn fire I have ever come across. I guess all the heat goes straight up the chimney. When we finally build our dream house we will have a ventless propane fire and a back up wood stove in the basement. I can hardly wait!

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  #15  
Old 10/30/12, 07:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidepasser View Post
I am going to get a small bottle of propane and figure out how to light this fireplace. I do not see any buttons or switches to push for the ignitor. The gas line runs outside to the side of the house.

Where would an ignition switch be located? I have looked all around the fireplace, on the walls, and down near the "logs".

Thanks!! and Thanks to all who have responded. I am real "country" when it comes to modern conveniences. I have lived with a wood heater for the past 26 years and have not dealt with anything like this before. I also had no clue how to turn on the a/c as I lived without an a/c unit for those same 26 years.

When you get used to doing things the "old fashioned" way, turns out you can adjust to no a/c and no electric heat just fine. lol..
We turn our propane logs on with a light switch on an adjoining wall.
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  #16  
Old 10/30/12, 07:55 AM
 
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Oh and ours is connected to the main house propane. There is a place to turn the propane on under the logs behind a little door. Then you just go over and flip the light switch.

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  #17  
Old 10/30/12, 07:59 AM
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Ours is propane and has a real chimney, and blowers. It takes electricity to start it, and of course to run the blowers, but we can heat our entire house with it, but I think it's designed for that. However, we only have it hooked up to a 100lb propane bottle, which costs about $75 to fill, and lasts about 3 days if we're solely heating with it... needless to say we use it for ambiance only! Can't wait to build and have a real wood stove again! This is the first house that we've ever had that we didn't heat with wood.

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  #18  
Old 10/30/12, 08:48 AM
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Mine has a little front door, behind it is a knob and plunger type igniter. The fireplace does have to be pluged in,becuse it has a blower. We are useing it right now,the wind is makeing it impossible to use the woodburner(extreme downdrafts).

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  #19  
Old 10/30/12, 08:58 AM
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I had a ventless propane wall heater a few years ago and it was fine as long as the temps stayed fairly warm but it was ineffective once the temps got below 40.
It was already in the house when I moved in & I suppose if I closed off a small area it would have kept a person from freezing but then there was the whole ventless thing & what closing in an area would have done.

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  #20  
Old 10/30/12, 10:20 AM
 
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We put a gas fireplace in when we built. It works by a switch whether the electricity is on or off and can heat our house pretty good. We have a large open area, so the family room and kitchen stay nice and warm when the electricity is off. We don't use it much when the other heat is on as it gets too warm.

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