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  #1  
Old 12/18/09, 05:30 PM
Tillysgirl's Avatar  
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survival property for sale

We are selling our survival property, in hopes of moving further out and opening a store. Here is a website with all of our information.

http://providencefarms.weebly.com/

You can PM me if you would like some more information or would like to set up a time to see it.

Thank you for looking.

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  #2  
Old 12/18/09, 09:21 PM
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Are you moving further out in the boonies, or further in towards town. I could see moving in towards people, if you were opening a store, but moving 'further out' would sort of put a crimp on customers coming into a store. And, if I were moving further out, I wouldn't be opening a store, as this would mean people would need to visit... and if you really needed your land for a survival location, it'd be on the minds of all the folks who'd visited the store. Operational Security....

Looked at your web site... looks nice, but I'm looking for at least a thousand acres, so if there are any locals nearby, I can have enough screening between us... preferably a valley property, surrounded on three sides by usfs, blm, nps, or other federal lands, or, by mountains or canyons so rough atv's can't penetrate.

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  #3  
Old 12/19/09, 10:31 AM
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zone 5 - riverfrontage
 
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What are the prices like?

Are they reasonible? $500/acre, or are they higher?

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  #4  
Old 12/19/09, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by rose2005 View Post
...
30 Acres
15 Field
15 Timber
Drilled Well (435 feet) 15 gallons per minute
30 x 30 habitable shop with attached 12x30 shed and upstairs loft

1 year round creek
1 seasonal creek
off-grid capabilities
Aren't all properties capable of being off-grid?



Quote:
...
250 yard shooting range
Chicken coop
Bee Hive stand A bee hive stand that is limited to 6 hives? With that much acerage? I'm interested in why that is.
Convenient location
County maintained road
Small town living
Wonderful country neighborhood
$225,000 without solar gear
$250,000 with solar gear

We have friends that were looking for real estate in that area.

Rose
Thanks Rose, 30 acres with a creek and a shed, but no house for 1/4 million dollars.

With paved road access, power / phone lines at the pavement; I would not see it going for over $50k. [assuming that it is close to a town and not out in the boonies]

I had no idea that land was still so expensive in that area.
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  #5  
Old 12/19/09, 12:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ET1 SS View Post
Aren't all properties capable of being off-grid?





Thanks Rose, 30 acres with a creek and a shed, but no house for 1/4 million dollars.

With paved road access, power / phone lines at the pavement; I would not see it going for over $50k. [assuming that it is close to a town and not out in the boonies]

I had no idea that land was still so expensive in that area.
I think you are making an editorial comment, not placing a realistic value on this property.

As you know very well, there are many places in YOUR state where a property like the one described would bring far more the $50k.
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  #6  
Old 12/19/09, 02:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rose2005 View Post
Yes land is expensive in the area, but lack of jobs is bringing the prices crunching down. Huge amount of forclosures and short sales.

Good luck with selling your property Tillysgirl. You may want to put some more pics up of it on here. Especially if the interior of your shop is livable. Might make all the difference.

Thank you for the input, Yes the shop is livable we have been living in it for the last 10 years. We will put photos of the inside as soon as possible. (we had not gotten to it yet)

Rose
Quote:
Originally Posted by rose2005 View Post
T

Bee Hive stand A bee hive stand that is limited to 6 hives? With that much acerage? I'm interested in why that is.
I got started in honey bees last summer that is all of the hives I had. I hope to get more next year.
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  #7  
Old 12/19/09, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by TurnerHill View Post
I think you are making an editorial comment, not placing a realistic value on this property.

As you know very well, there are many places in YOUR state where a property like the one described would bring far more the $50k.
How high a price you can get someone to pay is always for debate. There will always be realtors who are 'asking' a Million dollars for property that commonly sells for $10k.

We both know that you can get properties with the same description for much less than $50k too. Which is what I meant to be refering to.


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  #8  
Old 12/19/09, 02:35 PM
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When I sold my place last year I based my asking price upon what similar properties sold for around the area. I actually even priced it a little lower than the lowest selling property. The person I sold it to initially seem to think that my asking price was a bit high. So I told him to find another property for cheaper and show me and I would be willing to deal on the price. Well he couldn't and wound up quickly buying my land. Anyone can ask anything they want for property, a better gauge would be looking at what places have actually sold for in the area. Without knowing what property goes for in Priest River it may be a screaming deal or a huge rip off. I do have a vague familiarity with the area and going off of a very foggy memory I seem to recall that land prices that way are pretty steep.

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  #9  
Old 12/27/09, 11:04 PM
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The property in the OP is not really near Priest River...more like 2 hours south and totally different landscape. I don't know of any property in the PR area that would go for near 500 per acre.

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  #10  
Old 12/27/09, 11:19 PM
 
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1/4 of a million!

Better be a darn beautiful log home on it for that price.

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  #11  
Old 12/28/09, 02:08 AM
 
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I heard there was one heck of an ice storm in the Priest River area several years back and folks were without power for weeks and weeks. I'd thoroughly check out an area before making any serious purchases.

While property looks great in the summer months when you are out looking; you've got to talk to the folks who live there year round for information on what the winters are all about. We purchased 15 acres, just outside of town in Northern Idaho, and I was concerned about getting plowed out if I needed to go to town...luckily we returned to California for the winter months and the the seller is staying at our place. He has access to equipment to plow out the long road....then there are snow loads; could your home handle the snow loads? What about the care of pets and farm animals during those miserable months?

Would you have the necessary preps to handle a major snow or ice storm should one happen? While we have property in Northern Idaho, I have yet to stay there over the winter. When DH left a few weeks ago, it was in the teens and he was glad to get back to the 40 degree weather we'd been having in Northern California; it felt like summer to him.

You have to seriously consider your bug-out, survival location; make sure you could survive the winters as well as the rest of the year. I thought the Plummer area was in the flat, farming lands of Idaho. I'm not much of a flatlander; I've always lived in the foothills or near mountains.

One thing we are seeing in northern Idaho is access to firewood. They are closing some of the mountain roads (enviros)and the guys are having a heck of a time accessing downed trees to cut and bring back to their homes. This may be a future issue for some, if you don't have a good sized wood lot to begin with.

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  #12  
Old 12/28/09, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by TundraGypsy View Post
I heard there was one heck of an ice storm in the Priest River area several years back and folks were without power for weeks and weeks. I'd thoroughly check out an area before making any serious purchases.

While property looks great in the summer months when you are out looking; you've got to talk to the folks who live there year round for information on what the winters are all about. We purchased 15 acres, just outside of town in Northern Idaho, and I was concerned about getting plowed out if I needed to go to town...luckily we returned to California for the winter months and the the seller is staying at our place. He has access to equipment to plow out the long road....then there are snow loads; could your home handle the snow loads? What about the care of pets and farm animals during those miserable months?

Would you have the necessary preps to handle a major snow or ice storm should one happen? While we have property in Northern Idaho, I have yet to stay there over the winter. When DH left a few weeks ago, it was in the teens and he was glad to get back to the 40 degree weather we'd been having in Northern California; it felt like summer to him.

You have to seriously consider your bug-out, survival location; make sure you could survive the winters as well as the rest of the year. I thought the Plummer area was in the flat, farming lands of Idaho. I'm not much of a flatlander; I've always lived in the foothills or near mountains.

One thing we are seeing in northern Idaho is access to firewood. They are closing some of the mountain roads (enviros)and the guys are having a heck of a time accessing downed trees to cut and bring back to their homes. This may be a future issue for some, if you don't have a good sized wood lot to begin with.
We've lived in the Priest River area for the past (almost) 8 years. I haven't heard of a huge ice storm...snow is what we get and the power does go out occasionally but not as often as it does in say, Spokane...our nearest "big" city. We'd always heard about the winter of 94 but last winter was worse. We lived off grid for the first 7 years and have livestock...even used an outhouse for the first 2 winters.
Winters are not that horrendous, except for the last two and the unbelievable amounts of snow we got (around 12 feet).
It would be ridiculous to conceive of living here without your own means of snow removal, though you can hire people to do it. My husband did that for a winter and paid for his plow.
Most homes are built to handle the snow load and mobile homes have snow roofs built over them. We built our cabin so we know exactly what the load capacity is. And people shovel their roofs. It's a moneymaker for young men here...shoveling roofs. The National Guard was called in last year to shovel school roofs and school was called off while they did it. We hardly ever have school cancelled for anything.
I've not seen nor heard of any problems with accessing firewood. Most controversy surrounding getting into the backcountry here is about snowmobiles.
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  #13  
Old 12/28/09, 11:47 AM
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Tillysgirl: Have you been to City-Data? There are plenty of people on there from out of state looking for N. Idaho property and some looking in the Plummer area. Don't know if you can post it but you can always pm them.
http://www.city-data.com/forum/idaho/

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  #14  
Old 12/28/09, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ET1 SS View Post
How high a price you can get someone to pay is always for debate. There will always be realtors who are 'asking' a Million dollars for property that commonly sells for $10k.

We both know that you can get properties with the same description for much less than $50k too. Which is what I meant to be refering to.


Not here in the northern panhandle. Property is quite expensive.
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  #15  
Old 12/28/09, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by LisaInN.Idaho View Post
Not here in the northern panhandle. Property is quite expensive.
It's been a while since I looked at federal maps of the area, but from my memory, a very large percentage of the land is in National Forests and Commercial timber property... with very little private land. Supply and Demand makes that small percentage of private land a whole lot more valuable. At least in other areas of high federal ownership it does. I'd love to have a nice upper end of a valley in N Idaho, but the supply/demand equations always kept me from looking too hard.

...and, the horrendous snow thingie... I reckon if you dislike the cold and hate the snow, it would be horrible... but if you like the snow, and being isolated, it's precious.

Paved road leading right up to the property would be a negative in my book... I'd want at least a couple miles of dirt or gravel... to keep the riff raff out.
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  #16  
Old 12/28/09, 01:43 PM
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It's been a while since I looked at federal maps of the area, but from my memory, a very large percentage of the land is in National Forests and Commercial timber property... with very little private land. Supply and Demand makes that small percentage of private land a whole lot more valuable. At least in other areas of high federal ownership it does. I'd love to have a nice upper end of a valley in N Idaho, but the supply/demand equations always kept me from looking too hard.

...and, the horrendous snow thingie... I reckon if you dislike the cold and hate the snow, it would be horrible... but if you like the snow, and being isolated, it's precious.

Paved road leading right up to the property would be a negative in my book... I'd want at least a couple miles of dirt or gravel... to keep the riff raff out.
We're in a small pocket of private land surrounded by National Forest and state lands. We're very lucky to have the land we do. I thought it was enormously expensive when we bought it 9 years ago (bare land) but it had tripled in value before the recession hit. It'll climb right back after this is over. Like you said, there is only so much private land and we're lucky to have a half mile of river frontage.

We've got the couple of miles of dirt and gravel. The riff-raff still use it as a back way to the lake though. Right now it's pretty much a sheet of ice and will stay that way for a good while. Yay for studded snow tires!
Liked the snow fine but the amount we got the last couple of years made everyday life more difficult for sure. If we could just hole up it would be easier but we have kids and animals and things have got to get done and kids have to get to school. Though one was off at college and one was homeschooled the last few years. Now one is in the local high school so I'm still hoping for a milder winter and so far we're getting it.
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  #17  
Old 12/28/09, 05:13 PM
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Originally Posted by LisaInN.Idaho View Post
Not here in the northern panhandle. Property is quite expensive.
Expensive land seems to be popping up in many areas.
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  #18  
Old 12/28/09, 09:35 PM
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Expensive land seems to be popping up in many areas.
Well that's kind of my point...it's not expensive for this area. Your price range would be the exception. It's practically (if not completely) non-existent in north Idaho.
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  #19  
Old 12/28/09, 10:48 PM
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I had posted one of my listings in Poulsbo, WA. There was only (1) listing with 18.99 acres of land (most of it a timber farm with a creek). This listing had a Chalet style 3K+ sq foot home w/all bedrooms except master on upper level (with full basement- no br's in it), built timber frame/stick construction (what the builder/seller called it), 3 fireplaces (one in the kitchen dining area), a large shop (partially open used for boat-building with 3 phase power---IMPOSSIBLE to get most places here now), and a "fixer" house on a non-permanent foundation so only taxed as storage (a fixable 1 br barn style house w/loft & attic). The main house's roof was only two years old. The asking price was last at $455K. I cannot say what it is in contract for, but that was a break even price to sell at with no profit to the Sellers & a severely reduced commission (mine- done for them to get it sold faster). The offer price is far less and was accepted by the bank- a short sale. The price being paid for this property wouldn't get you 10 good acres in Poulsbo...

Now, here is the point. Most on here would say $455K for a 18.99 acres, timber farm ($100K+ current prices and could be worth far more when this economy recovers or stabilizes) was RIDICULOUS. In fact, I was told it was way over priced. To get land like this with nothing on it, in that area? $450K would be considered a good price in this market! It was listed for under market value at $455K (1 lg Chalet, 1 lg Shop, 1 Fixer house AND 18.99 acres).

I have one listed locally and an Agent, in front of the Buyers and my clients, the Sellers... He actually told them all that their listing was worth about $50,000 less and compared it to MUCH LESS desirable area listings. My clients aren't stupid and neither am I- we had an appraisal done with current values. That Agent actually argued the very well done appraisal was incorrect. His clients tried to persuade mine to accept their lousy offer (the house is incredibly well built & has radiant heat on both floors, and also 3,400 sq feet---the 6.74 acres completely cleared with 4.04 acres fenced). This couple said it would cost them $500K to build on their own 5 acre property a similar home and also a big barn for their horses. They must have been on something... They cannot "have" a large home of this quality (it is custom and high end) built and also a decent barn built (they have no building skills themselves & would have to pay for everything to be done) and not to mention the pricey $20K septic system they will have to have...this $500K was supposed to also include what they owe on their 5 acres. Hmmm, will they be in for a surprise.

What those Buyers didn't know? They would have been beyond lucky to have purchased into our community (we all help each other and there are incredibly cool neighbors). Where they currently live is nothing like ours.

I agree with Lisa in N Idaho- Values are what the market will pay and that differs in different areas, cities, counties, and States!

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  #20  
Old 12/29/09, 01:04 AM
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Land prices in north Idaho have seadily been on the rise for the past 20 years, but took a leap a few years back when the idiot Rawles said it was the best place for yuppies to go for survival..... yeah right they come in here and buy without hesitation, then want the same amenities they had in the city, complain if they dont get it and then complain cause their taxes are "high"......

As an endangered specie, a native Idahoan, I feel threaten in my way of life as these people come in and ruin what was once decent to live here, they stay for a couple seasons and then convince someone else to come in and buy their high price oversized so called custom houses [which 99% are nothing more than hoped up "blow and go's" with no particular customization] Bare4 ground here still runs between 5 and 10 grand per acre with no rhyme or reason to which is offered at what price..... wages average less than $10.00 here which is actually lower than 20 years ago [not much logging any longer and most mills are gone too]

Plummer is on the Courd a lene Indian reservation, and is not all "flatland" though some might call it that, it is not like the Rathdrum prairie to the north, or the Camas prairie further south but more close to the Palouse with its rolling hills though containing a better silva culture being closer to the mountain range of the St. Joe Forest..... not that ive been around the area much......

William
Further south in north CENTRAL idaho..... clearwater river region

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