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  #1  
Old 03/19/08, 08:29 AM
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How many pounds per person do you store?

I am getting ready to order grains. How much would you store per person? I am no expert on emergency preparedness. I doubt anyone ever feels "ready" for anything. But anything I can do to prepare will help. We are a family of 6.

Wheat:
Rice:
Oats:
Beans:

We already raise goats, chickens, lambs and pigs. We have goat's potentially for meat, we milk our goats, have chickens for meat and eggs, lambs for meat and pigs for more meat. We buy beef by the half. Of course if electricity went out, we'd be toast! (canning like mad until it went bad at least) But, we do have lots of stored frozen meat. We plan to have a big garden this year and can and freeze all we can.

What other foods would you store and in what quantity?

Nicole

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  #2  
Old 03/19/08, 08:38 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Florida
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have you tried a google search for LDS food storage amounts. They give some pretty detailed amounts of grains and beans (as well as other things) for storage. tyusclan momma

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  #3  
Old 03/19/08, 08:41 AM
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 260

The best place for you to look for storage information is A. T. Hagan's work. Lots of important information! This is from his sig line:


Alan's Stuff: The Prudent Food Storage FAQ and more.
http://athagan.members.atlantic.net/Index.html

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  #4  
Old 03/19/08, 11:07 AM
A.T. Hagan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GallagherFarm View Post
I am getting ready to order grains. How much would you store per person? I am no expert on emergency preparedness. I doubt anyone ever feels "ready" for anything. But anything I can do to prepare will help. We are a family of 6.

Wheat:
Rice:
Oats:
Beans:

We already raise goats, chickens, lambs and pigs. We have goat's potentially for meat, we milk our goats, have chickens for meat and eggs, lambs for meat and pigs for more meat. We buy beef by the half. Of course if electricity went out, we'd be toast! (canning like mad until it went bad at least) But, we do have lots of stored frozen meat. We plan to have a big garden this year and can and freeze all we can.

What other foods would you store and in what quantity?

Nicole
Here is a food storage calculator that will help you rough out your initial food storage program: http://lds.about.com/library/bl/faq/blcalculator.htm

It is not wholly complete in itself, but will help you to rough out the beginning amounts of the major storable components. Experience over time will enable you to sharpen your focus on precise amounts.

Before you buy any of this stuff how much of it do you eat on a regular basis? If you're not accustomed to milling and using whole-wheat flour I do not recommend putting so much as a pound of it into your food storage. Buy twenty five or fifty pounds first and learn both to use and whether or not you and your family even likes it. The same for any of the other stuff as well.

If it's stuff that you already know your family likes and will eat then go ahead and buy what the calculator recommends.

Additional foods that I would put away in addition to the four you list above plus your livestock would be fats and oils; sweeteners such as whatever kinds of sugars your family uses, whatever liquid sweeteners such as syrups and honey, and so on; and adjuncts such as SALT, baking soda, baking powder, cocoa powder, herbs & spices, extracts, vinegars, and all that good stuff.

If you're going to be doing major canning and counting on what you can as a serious part of your food storage then stocking up on canning supplies becomes a must.

If your livestock is a serious part of your planning and you're buying feed then feed storage becomes a must.

.....Alan.
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  #5  
Old 03/19/08, 11:26 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
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I am just beginning my food storage preps and used the link to determine what quantities our family needs... but I'm not seeing anywere that tells what amount of time these quantities are prepping us for? Is this a years worth?

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  #6  
Old 03/19/08, 11:35 AM
A.T. Hagan
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Yes, it's for a year. Do appropriate division for shorter time periods.

.....Alan.

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  #7  
Old 03/19/08, 01:17 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
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WOW!!! Is that really how much we eat in a year??? I need 525 lbs of flour for my family of 5! The kids are under 6, so they need less. Geesh! I thought I was doing good having 50 lbs of flour. Guess not.

This is going to take a lot more planning than I'd first thought. Thanks for the link, though. It's a great list so I don't forget anything.

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  #8  
Old 03/19/08, 01:33 PM
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pigletmsu - do you make your own loaf bread, dinner rolls, tortillas, noodles, pie crusts, hamburger buns, croutons..... ? Those all require flour.

Of course, maybe your family doesn't eat much wheat.

The calculators are a guideline. Every family is different. Use the calculators as an idea, then buy maybe three months worth and see how fast you go through the various items, and as you increase your stores from three to six months worth, you'll know what you use a lot of and what you don't use much of, and you can adjust accordingly.

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  #9  
Old 03/19/08, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by pigletmsu View Post
This is going to take a lot more planning than I'd first thought. Thanks for the link, though. It's a great list so I don't forget anything.
This is absolutely nothing so valuable as keeping your own records to determine how much of what you are going to need.

Starting today with your very next meal write down everything you used in producing that meal. The same for every other meal for a week. Then start totaling it up. You may be shocked at what it comes to. Don't forget to include any food that is consumed outside of the house. Every meal, every snack that anyone in the family eats should be counted.

Once you have that week's data you have a solid starting point. Some of it won't be storable, some of it may be too expensive to store in quantity, but you'll have a solid starting point. From there you can begin to make some real decisions.

For what it's worth I agree with Turtlehead. I wouldn't try for a year's supply all at once if this is new to you. Get yourself a solid two weeks supply first. The expand to a month. Then three months, then six, and if you want to go that far take it to a year. There is a learning curve to these things that will be easier to scale with smaller quantities. It's easier to reach a year's supply if you've already got six months in the bag.

.....Alan.
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  #10  
Old 03/19/08, 02:37 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
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Originally Posted by turtlehead View Post
pigletmsu - do you make your own loaf bread, dinner rolls, tortillas, noodles, pie crusts, hamburger buns, croutons..... ? Those all require flour.
Good point. I do know and have made all of those from scratch, but don't on a regular basis. I was thinking that we go thru 1-2 loaves of bread a week, which is about 8 cups of flour, so I calculated from that. Guess I was short-sighted. Forgot about pasta, tortillas and rolls/buns.

I will start writing down what we eat. And then go from there.
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  #11  
Old 03/19/08, 03:05 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Ohio
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Now don't forget. When figuring out how many pounds to store, take into consideration how many pounds each person already has stored on their body, no packaging needed. It's portable, everywhere I go there I am and a few pounds extra. If things get bad I can use that up too.

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  #12  
Old 03/19/08, 08:23 PM
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The LDS website suggests a minimum of 25# grain, 5# legumes (beans) per person per month. You can also use the calculator here:
http://www.thefoodguys.com/foodcalc.html

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  #13  
Old 03/19/08, 08:38 PM
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When you think about the total picture it sure adds up. Flour use seems small until you think about all the things you eat that have wheat flour in them. Cereals, crackers, biscuits, breads, cookies etc. etc. This winter I was trying to do everything from basic storage items that I stock. It takes a lot of effort, but there is a lot of money to be saved if you do it all from scratch.

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  #14  
Old 03/19/08, 09:30 PM
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One of the things I do to help build storage is to cook extra with many meals, then can the leftovers to have ready to eat meals on the shelf. I've built up a lot of meals that way.

I also store what is called "cream of whatever soup" mix. Here's the recipe to make it.

2 c powdered nonfat milk
3/4 c. cornstarch
1/4 c. chicken bouillon
2 Tbsp dried onion flakes
1 tsp basil leaves
1 tsp thyme or tarragon
1/2 tsp pepper

Combine all ingredients until mixed well.

To sub for a can of cream of whatever soup, combine 1/3 cup of mix with 1 1/4 cups cold water. Heat and stir until thickened. Use as you would a can of soup. It's equilivent to a single can of soup.

Mushroom: add 1/2 cup finely chopped mushrooms
Celery: add 1/2 cup finely minced celery
Potato: add 1 cup cooked diced potatoes
Chicken: add 1/2 cup cooked chicken
Vegetable: add 3/4 cup cooked veggies
Broccoli: add 1 cup cooked chopped broccoli
Sop de Tortilla: corn tortillas, torn to chip size & green onions, 1/2 bunch fresh cilantro, crushed garlic, 1 or 2 chopped tomatoes, salt, pepper, & cheese.


A friend gave me a jar of this mix for Christmas. I'm glad she included the recipe to make it cause I love this stuff! It makes a can of soup for a few pennies (a few more pennies now than then, but still a fraction of what a can of soup costs)

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  #15  
Old 03/19/08, 10:16 PM
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Thanks for the recipes Spinner........I have not seen that recipe before. Definately going to try it.

Like you I cook large pots of things and then can them up after I am sick of eating them. I probably have 100 dump and serve meals in jars after doing it all winter. In the summer when I am working outside all day I can just open a jar of something, heat and eat.

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  #16  
Old 03/19/08, 10:21 PM
 
Join Date: May 2004
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Also remember all the bread items eaten while eating out at fast food, etc.

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