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  #121  
Old 11/04/08, 07:59 AM
 
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Location: Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
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Originally Posted by heyrakes View Post
when y'all speak of using "blackstrap molasses" in with your grains, is that the same thing as what is called sweet feed? like we feed horses?
Sorry, while the digestive systems of horses and rabbits share many similarities, I really know very little about feed for horses. I think there may be blackstrap in sweet feed, from what bit I have read about it. Why not check the ingredient list? My concern about using products intended for one animal to feed a different kind of animal is that there may also be other ingredients that are not so desirable. You would want to be very careful.
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  #122  
Old 11/08/08, 01:31 AM
 
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Yes molasses is in sweet feed. You don't really need the extra iron if you have iron in your water, such as well water.

I'm new here, and after reading through ya'll posts, I've concluded that you are feeding your rabbits exactly like I was feeding my dairy goats. I got my info from Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable.

I have been thinking some time that I could feed my rabbits like my goats: whole grains, black oil sunflower seeds, all they legume/grass mix hay they could want, and kelp meal and mineral salt for supplements. For goats I had to limit the grains. And I fed mine alfalfa pellets.

Here's a couple of things for you guys to consider. If you store your whole grains outside in warm weather, the bugs will get them. I have to store mine outside, under cover in metal trash cans. So I mix 2% diatomaceous earth to keep the bugs out. Its a common feed supplement for livestock. I'm thinking it wouldn't hurt the bunnies. It's just powdered fossilized shells. Anyway make sure it doesn't have anything added and that it's okay for feed. I have seen small bags of it labeled not for feed.

Another thing. If your soil is imbalanced, your plants will be too. So all the more reason to offer minerals free choice and kelp meal in the grain. Kelp has a lot of trace minerals, as does mineral salt. But another thing lacking could be calcium, if you aren't giving a legume hay such as alfalfa. You don't have to give just alfalfa; but lactating does would benefit from the calcium. I think dandelions have calcium too; many spring greens do.....timing just right with spring births. Winter may be trickier.

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  #123  
Old 11/08/08, 04:02 AM
 
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Location: Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
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Shae, welcome to the Rabbit Forum. I don't think I've seen you over here before.

You raise some excellent points. Where did you obtain the Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable? We often feel as though we are reinventing the wheel here... we know that natural feeding for rabbits was not only the norm, but the only way to feed them until pelleted feed became available after WW2. So much information has been lost, or at least misplaced, in the past sixty years.

I would like to offer my rabbits mineral salts, but frankly when I go to the feedstore I am bewildered by the different types and the people working there do not always have a good understanding of the uses of their products. Labelling is also scanty in many cases. Faced with the choice of blue, red or white salt blocks, I am never sure what might be safe for my rabbits. And since, apart from my rabbits, I have only a few geese and chickens I cannot rely on previous experience. I had a rural childhood, but not a farming childhood.

Regarding problems such as "bugs" in the grain, I suspect that is more of a problem the further south you go. I feed my chickens, geese and rabbits all from the same bag of scratch (which, most fortunately, has very little cracked corn in it anymore, thanks to ethanol) and I have never seen any kind of bugs in the grain. DE is likely okay for rabbits, but they do have delicate respiratory systems, so one would want to make sure they cannot inhale it.

I cannot speak to the challenges of soil chemistry that others may be facing. The soil here is good. Most of it seems to have been under pasture or grain crops in the past and has been underused for the past fifty or sixty years at least. The previous owners, who had the place from about 1957 until 2001 had a garden and a home poultry flock and perhaps a pig or two... but nothing to put pressure on the soil. I think my experience of this is fairly typical of many of the folks who are interested in feeding rabbits naturally... but I know there are others trying to reclaim farmland that has been abused, overworked and neglected as well.

Kelp is an interesting supplement and one I would like to know more about. Being so far from the ocean here in Southern Ontario, it is one of those things that has never much come my way. Any information you care to share would be welcome.

We try very hard not to rely heavily on grain for our rabbits, but I have found that the working does and growing kits do need some concentrated food. Since I am trying to avoid pelleted feeds - just a personal preference but one that many seem to share with me - I do not use alfalfa pellets. I agree they are convenient and practical, but I am trying to establish a feeding regime for rabbits that uses hay, gathered greens and small amounts of natural grains and seeds. I am NOT there yet, but then I've only been raising rabbits for just over three years.

I have been amazed by the response to my efforts in this direction. When I joined HT in early 2006 and began questioning the wisdom of the processed feeds, I was constantly given reasons why they were the only way to go. I'm grateful for this because this conventional "wisdom" gave me a brick wall to bash my silly head against. "Oh, don't feed alfalfa hay, they get it in the pellets." "Don't feed grain, there's grain in their pellets." What bothered me was what else was in the pellets - like animal tallow. And why the need for all the mysterious and poorly understood vitamin/mineral additions? Why not just feed the alfalfa hay and grains and seeds and the greens we know are safe instead?

In retrospect, I realize that many people were doing just that, but that natural feeding was not receiving the publicity and interest that it has recently. I am still working through the mountain of information to arrive at an optimum natural diet for the rabbits. As you so correctly point out, it is not so different from the natural feeding for goats.

Calcium is a controversial point in rabbit feeding. Too much and the rabbits may suffer from bladder sludge or kidney stones. Too little and they will suffer deficiency problems. Does and growing kits need much more than bucks... so why do we tend to feed all our rabbits alike? This is something that is on my mind a lot at the moment.

Thanks for stopping by, Outofmire. I hope you will stick around! I'd very much enjoy being able to bat some of these ideas around with you.

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  #124  
Old 11/08/08, 05:53 PM
 
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Thanks for the welcome Maggie. I only started raising rabbits a year and a half ago, so and that's why I never posted on this forum.

I had the same idea many of you have, of growing some rabbit crops and cutting green chop. I'd like to raise them in a colony because I think it would be easier to fill one hay manger each day rather than 9. I have a plan that's in the works. We're clearing land right now for a garden, pasture for the rabbits, and herbs for all of us. I'd like to eventually produce or wild harvest most of their food.

I'm curious how much grain you give your rabbits. Most working and growing animals get 3-4% of their body weight in dry matter per day. So i figure each of my 10# rabbits will get 4.8-6.4 oz in dry food per day. Does that sound about right? When I raised goats I figured on 1/6 of their food being from grain and black oil sunflower seeds, and the other 5/6 from plants, such as alfalfa and grass hay. So for a 10# rabbit that would work out to be .8-1 oz in grain per day. Of course, bucks, kits, and dry does, if they are like goats, wouldn't need much grain, if any, especially if they were getting a good amount of protein from the weeds and legume hay or green chop. How does that relate to how much grain you give your rabbits?

I got some of this info from a book called Small Scale Livestock Farming. It is all about grass farming and raising pastured livestock. Many libraries have it. The other book I spoke of, The Complete Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable, is by Juliette Levy and can be found at Amazon. Really it is more about herbal remedies for sheep, goats, cows, horses, dogs, chickens, and bees. Rabbits aren't mentioned. Disappointing really. She just listed traditional foods for goats, not amounts really. After looking through it just now, I wondered how I worked out such a specific diet. I guess I worked out the specifics from other sources, such as Natural Goat Care, and online sources.

Her writing style is almost like she pieced together notes; it doesn't flow all that well. But her herbal knowledge has helped me with my animals and family. You just have to be willing to dig for the information, because it's not always easy to follow. And she doesn't always elaborate on something at first, but may go into more detail in another part of the book.

Mineral salts: You want to get the naturally occurring mineral salts, not the molded, man-made blocks. The natural salts are mined from the ground. They are reddish to pink in color. Those deer salt blocks that look like irregularly shaped chunks are natural salts. You can also buy them ground up by the bag, such as redmond salt. I can buy loose mineral salt from a bin at my local Whole Foods Store. You can buy smaller amounts that way. You can order it from Countryside Natural Feed, but I'm not sure about the shipping rates to Ontario. They have kelp and organic grains too. If you go to www.thorvin.com you can find out all about kelp meal, how it's harvested and prepared, plus feeding rates for different animals. Rabbits aren't listed, but it can probably be deduced from rates for other similarly sized animals.

DE and rabbits: Thanks for the reminder about their respiratory problems. I guess I could soak them in water first? Will they eat moist grains?


For me, the biggest challenge is going to be feeding them enough protein for proper growth and lactation. It's hard to do without legume hay, and I'm not sure legumes will grow well on my shallow soil without irrigation, which is something I'm short of. Pearl Millet grass is supposed to have a goodly amount of protein. Grains are usually around 12%, which is not enough, and I wouldn't want to give that much grain anyway. The good thing is that many weeds do have the protein, such as dandelions, and green briar leaves. Does anyone know if rabbits will eat green briar leaves. Still I don't think I can depend on having enough feed for these rabbits without something that can be cut several times and grow back, and something that I can grow a lot of, such as legumes or pearl millet grass. Still looking for some other options. I hope to find some ideas here. But for now I think I'll have to order the alfalfa pellets to use over the winter while where clearing so more grass and weeds will grow.

What are the rest of you feeding during winter?

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  #125  
Old 11/10/08, 08:49 AM
 
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For most of the year, I like to give my does a small handful of grain each day. Since I do have small hands, I think this would be about 1/4c. The bucks or adult dry does get about half that, unless they begin to look too lean. I do realize that I should be using measurement by weight, not volume, but haven't got to it yet. In very cold weather, I would bump this up a tad. When good greens are plentiful, I get stingy with the grain.

For lactating does and their kits, I give grain more-or-less free choice. I expect to see some left after 12 hours. Most does are not pigs... and their appetites vary with the demands placed on them... so I let them decide unless I see them getting too fat. Once the kits are weaned and separated from their momma, they stay on generous rations of grain, but I cut momma's back over to the usual 1/4 cup, unless she is looking thin.

In additon to this, all the rabbits have free-choice hay and as much fresh feed as I can manage. This is about the worst time of year for greens, since everything is badly frost-bitten, leaves have fallen and my winter windowsill garden is not yet underway. I've been feeding small amounts of carrots, beets, pumpkin or squash and grass and weeds by the handful, not the bucketful. It's not perfect, but everyone seems to be doing just fine on it.

Regarding DE and moistening the grains... You will want to be very careful of moisture to avoid having moulds develop. Mould (mold) can be very dangerous too. You might consider looking into herbal repellents for the bugs in the grain. A cheesecloth bag stuffed with dried herbs might repel them. make sure you don't use anything highly toxic to rabbits, even though they will not be eating them. This is just an idea off the top of my head, so please do a little research before trying it.

Regarding greens, many of them have excellent protein content. Willow (Salix species, including weeping willow) have protein in excess of 16%. There are many weeds with high protein too. I'm not quite sure what you mean by green briar. We try to include botanical names so as to avoid confusion.

Roasted soybean meal, sunflower seeds, peanut meal have all been suggested in moderate quantities to boost protein levels. I'm not totally happy with any of these, but they bear looking into.

Edited to add: Here's a link to one of last summer's threads on green feeding. There is some good detailed information and links in it.
http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/sho...d.php?t=261016

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  #126  
Old 11/19/08, 01:31 PM
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This thread is getting better and better - thanks everyone! My ideas are much like outofmire's. I don't have rabbits yet, but I used to raise them and intend to again someday soon - hopefully. I was thinking that feeding goats and rabbits were very much the same and now reading this helps bear that out... thanks again.

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  #127  
Old 11/21/08, 11:05 AM
 
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I am reading this post in marvel. I have been looking for info on feeding my rabbits more naturally as they are not producing as rabbits should and I think they are too fat. I read in Carla Emery's book that overweight does can have trouble breeding and giving birth to young. I don't know the different weeds listed here so I am doing some studying on the matter.

I do have blackberry leaves I am going to start adding slowly to their diets. We have bahai (sp) grass hay here. I am going to try and make some type of manger to put this into. I have lots of pecan hulls from getting my nuts out. I was wondering if these would be safe. I think they would be good for their teeth. I googled, but did not find and answer there, so I am hoping someone here may have done this before. Also, I still have green leaves on my rose bushes (and some blooms). I am wondering if that would be ok to feed them. Thanks in advance for replies.

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  #128  
Old 11/21/08, 11:27 AM
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Your buns would love the roses firegirl!

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  #129  
Old 11/21/08, 03:36 PM
 
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All parts of the rose plant are edible for buns. Not sure about the pecan hulls, though... I can't think there would be much good in them, even if they are safe. Branches from willow or apple would be better for their teeth.

I feel we are making good progress with the natural feeding, but we've really only just scratched the surface. Finding out what is edible for the buns is a start... but we have much more to learn about what combinations of green feeds give them the best nutrition. Welcome aboard, Firegirl969!

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  #130  
Old 12/10/08, 02:52 PM
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I've been working on my bunny mix for the feeder lately, here's what I've been using: the cheapest alfalfa pellets I can find + home grown sunflower seeds (regular and black oil), dried squash 'guts' and peelings, dried potato peelings (heated a few minutes in the oven to make sure they're cooked), dried sweet potato peelings, and dried corn. To this I also add 'weeds' from the yard (dandelion, chickweed, dock, thistle, etc.) and timothy hay from the store.

They absolutely love dried out toast, old stale potato chips, ends of veggies, and fruit, although I give the last in moderation as mine tend to get runny-butt otherwise. A splash of homemade vinegar in their water bottles seems to help with that.

I also bought some unsprayed dry corn and tried tossing a whole ear in as a treat for Thanksgiving. They've eaten theirs down to the cob, husks, silk and all! They also seem to like oat and wheat stalks left over from threshing.

I've planted alfalfa but it hasn't come up much yet. When I get a good amount of that going I might even be able to dispense with the pellets!

I was wondering about rose bushes, good to hear they're edible for rabbits too.

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  #131  
Old 12/10/08, 04:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by RedStateGreen View Post
I've been working on my bunny mix for the feeder lately, here's what I've been using: the cheapest alfalfa pellets I can find + home grown sunflower seeds (regular and black oil), dried squash 'guts' and peelings, dried potato peelings (heated a few minutes in the oven to make sure they're cooked), dried sweet potato peelings, and dried corn. To this I also add 'weeds' from the yard (dandelion, chickweed, dock, thistle, etc.) and timothy hay from the store.

They absolutely love dried out toast, old stale potato chips, ends of veggies, and fruit, although I give the last in moderation as mine tend to get runny-butt otherwise. A splash of homemade vinegar in their water bottles seems to help with that.

I also bought some unsprayed dry corn and tried tossing a whole ear in as a treat for Thanksgiving. They've eaten theirs down to the cob, husks, silk and all! They also seem to like oat and wheat stalks left over from threshing.

I've planted alfalfa but it hasn't come up much yet. When I get a good amount of that going I might even be able to dispense with the pellets!

I was wondering about rose bushes, good to hear they're edible for rabbits too.
That all sounds pretty good, RedStateGreen, except for the potato chips. The potato peelings, cooked, are fine as long as they are not green and have no eyes sprouting. Both those are toxic, but I'm sure you know that.
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  #132  
Old 12/11/08, 12:31 PM
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beans

What about beans, are rabbits going to eat beans and beans sprouts, How do you know if the Hay is too old for them? please let me know.

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  #133  
Old 12/11/08, 01:33 PM
 
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Beans are not good for rabbits. Sometimes you see soybeans in rabbit food, but they are steamed or roasted to break down the substance in them that is harmful. I don't remember the details of how that works, sorry.

Hay that is mouldy (moldy on your side of the border) or that is really dusty is not suitable for rabbits. Feed the best hay you can get. Usually hay that is suitable for horses will also be good for rabbits.

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  #134  
Old 12/12/08, 11:45 AM
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last winter

They got rid of a lot of hay around my home, because it was "Moldy" and more than once I saw wild rabbits eating it. Now I don't know if they "kicked" the bucket after their lunch or what, I saw them several times during the winter doing this... I wonder.

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  #135  
Old 12/12/08, 12:17 PM
 
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I can't give you a definitive answer to this, Greenboy. But do you really want to chance making your rabbits sick by feeding them less than the best?

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  #136  
Old 12/12/08, 12:28 PM
 
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Years ago we fed moldy hay to 2 pet bunnies. Both ended up with respiratory infections that eventually killed them. The difference may be the proximity of the hay - not the eating of it. A wild bun can eat & run - the caged bun has to breath in the mold spores.

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  #137  
Old 12/12/08, 02:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Bonnie L View Post
Years ago we fed moldy hay to 2 pet bunnies. Both ended up with respiratory infections that eventually killed them. The difference may be the proximity of the hay - not the eating of it. A wild bun can eat & run - the caged bun has to breath in the mold spores.
Makes sense to me, Bonnie. Thanks for posting about it.
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  #138  
Old 12/12/08, 03:27 PM
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Please please don't get me wrong

I just want to know why the wild rabbit did not find the hay nasty or they were really starving, maybe when they eat moldy hay in the outside the mold do not affect them. I don't know, I am just looking for an answer, also with beans, my grandfather loved black beans and he had a "special stock" and he planted the same black beans every year, and I remember the rabbits were eating them? maybe was another animal I don't know.

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  #139  
Old 12/12/08, 04:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by greenboy View Post
I just want to know why the wild rabbit did not find the hay nasty or they were really starving, maybe when they eat moldy hay in the outside the mold do not affect them. I don't know, I am just looking for an answer, also with beans, my grandfather loved black beans and he had a "special stock" and he planted the same black beans every year, and I remember the rabbits were eating them? maybe was another animal I don't know.
Greenboy, we have worked very hard to learn what natural foods are safe for rabbits. It is not an exact science. For almost every plant on our "not safe" list, there is a story somewhere of how a rabbit ate this item without harm. There could be many reasons for this. Some plants are toxic only in large quantities. Some plants are toxic but not fatal. Some plants are fine in spring but take too many nitrates out of the soil and concentrate them in their leaves and so are not good by August or thereabouts. Some plants have edible leaves but not the seeds and for others it is the other way around. If you read everything in this thread and the "Safe Plants" thread, you should start to gain an understanding of what works and what doesn't. Good luck.
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  #140  
Old 12/13/08, 01:48 PM
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I was wondering, what is a recipie for a natural feed??? In otherwords, what dose a normal days feed consist of?(ie. Hay, grain ect)

Its probably in this thread somwhere, and im probably just to lazy to read everything

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  #141  
Old 12/13/08, 02:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Jesse L View Post
I was wondering, what is a recipie for a natural feed??? In otherwords, what dose a normal days feed consist of?(ie. Hay, grain ect)

Its probably in this thread somwhere, and im probably just to lazy to read everything
Tsk, tsk, Jesse... Don't be so lazy!

The basis for a natural diet for rabbits is hay. If you think of the feeding program as a pyramid, hay is the broad layer at the base. Hay includes both grass hay and legume hay such as clover or alfalfa... since the buns are not getting pellets. I feed hay more-or-less free choice.

Fresh foods (and in winter this can include dried greens since really fresh ones can be in short supply) make up the centre layer. This includes gathered weeds and grasses, certain tree leaves and twigs, vegetables, fruits etc. In summer this layer in the pyramid is thicker, taking up some space from the hay layer below and the concentrates layer above. Once your rabbits are well-accustomed to fresh foods, they can have as much as they will clean up between feedings. I find it is best to feed greens divided into morning and evening meals. It seems to satisfy the rabbits better that way.

Concentrates make up the tip of the pyramid. These should be limited except for nursing does and growing kits. Grains, seeds and nuts make up most of this layer. I feed these once a day, usually in evening. For bucks and non-producing does, I feed only 1/8 to 1/4 cup, especially in summer when greens are abundant. Too much from this group will make them fat.

That's the "Reader's Digest" version of how I feed my rabbits, specially condensed for lazy readers. For more detail, go back and read from the beginning.
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  #142  
Old 12/13/08, 03:26 PM
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Thanks Maggie!!!

Im going to get into meat rabbits in the spring and im going to natural feed them to save me money, i might even free feed my whole herd....

I have free hay, vegtable gardens and i need grain for my other livestock, it will be pretty much pure profit for me

Thanks again!

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  #143  
Old 12/13/08, 03:35 PM
 
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You're welcome. Start learning your weeds, if you don't already know them. The good weeds are your best source of free bunny food in the spring and summer.

Some more reading for you!
http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/sho...d.php?t=261016

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  #144  
Old 12/13/08, 03:39 PM
 
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Woo! just went out to my high school science teachers farm, about an hour out. His wife keeps horses. We got 2 bales of heavy alfalfa, and 3 of timothy/clover/grass. Theyre safely in the basement (same room as the dehumidifier) and we'll set a mousetrap.

the rabbits say YUM! they know how to eat real food. SO much cheaper than pellets. theyre getting some oatmeal that we overbought (will get to the feedstore and get some there soon), and they get maple leaves, dried sweet potato leaves, lettuce ends, and im still growing some beet tops. Ive got to get a little more green started for them this week.

Thanks so much for your knowledge!

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  #145  
Old 12/13/08, 04:06 PM
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I'm going to be growing veggies in a garden next summer for both my family and my rabbits - my first attempt at gardening Of course I'm worried that I'll kill all the plants and put in all that work for nothing

Any suggestions as to which plants are fairly "beginner-proof" that I can also feed to my bunnies? I've been looking at carrots, squash, zuchini, corn, and a few other veggies. I'm also hoping to get some type of thornless berries growing along the back fence - raspberries, blackberries, or blueberries......

Any advice for the gardening challenged???

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  #146  
Old 12/13/08, 04:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by bluemoonluck View Post
I'm going to be growing veggies in a garden next summer for both my family and my rabbits - my first attempt at gardening Of course I'm worried that I'll kill all the plants and put in all that work for nothing

Any suggestions as to which plants are fairly "beginner-proof" that I can also feed to my bunnies? I've been looking at carrots, squash, zuchini, corn, and a few other veggies. I'm also hoping to get some type of thornless berries growing along the back fence - raspberries, blackberries, or blueberries......

Any advice for the gardening challenged???
Don't be so quick to think that gardening is difficult. It's not, but like anything else, learning a bit before you start is a good idea.

If you are planning to use the garden for the buns, organic is best. Then you have no worries about chemicals and side effects. All that bunny poop can be added directly to your garden beds... giving your "beginner's luck" a helping hand.

Many of the weeds can be fed to the buns. Weeding is less of a chore when most of it is bunny salad. See the link in my previous post to the thread called "The Official Weeds for Feed Thread".

There are gardening boards here at Homesteading Today. Start reading on the Gardening and Plant Propagation forum as well as here.
http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/for...sprune=30&f=19

Get one or two good gardening books. I like Crow Miller's Let's Get Growing. It's interesting, easy to read and quite comprehensive. Try the library first, borrow an assortment and don't buy until you find one that is good for you. Note that used copies are usually quite reasonably priced.
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...TH=Crow+Miller

I'm by no means an expert gardener but my garden gets better each year. Plan to put it where it is easy to water. Mulch to retain water and cut down on the quantities of weeds. You'll do fine.
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  #147  
Old 12/13/08, 04:49 PM
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I just wander

I just wander if the wild rabbit "teach" their babies what to eat, and the domesticated rabbits lost that ability and they depend of the "master" to provide whatever, when I put weeds and "gardening waste in my father's rabbits they eat some of those and others they just ignore them, my father feed them everything, but I wander if somebody have a receipt for food...??? I avoid pellets as much as I can because they are not cheap and I think the good Lord sent them to clean the wild of unwanted greens. But Pellets are a nice supply during winter, father is getting old and he doesnt want to get hay for winter.

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  #148  
Old 12/14/08, 10:25 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 280

I recently identified another plant in the side yard (moved here in May, still learning!) and its Salad Burnet. its a bit strong tasting right now, but I was curious as to if the rabbits could have it.
I found this:
http://www.medirabbit.com/EN/GI_dise...feeding_en.pdf

it encourages LOTS of veggies, and has nice pictures and Latin names of plants!

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  #149  
Old 12/14/08, 10:41 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 11,244

That's a pretty good article, Garnetmoth. Thanks for posting the link to it.

One quibble I have with it, however, concerns herbs. Because most herbs have medicinal properties, I advise a working knowledge of their uses before feeding them to the rabbits as more than a taste. Mint, lavender and sage all have their uses but they can interfere with reproduction and lactation. This is just an example of the kind of thing one needs to look out for. I think the reason this has been overlooked in this article is that it is a PET article. Since they do not breed their rabbits, they do not need to pay attention to these considerations.

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  #150  
Old 12/17/08, 10:26 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,127
What about

Bread i used to feed my rabbits when I was a boy a lot of old bread. Also when you
know when a rabbit is constipated?

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