Quantcast
Premier1 electric net fencing questions - Homesteading Today
Homesteading Today

Come enter the Lehman's Aladdin Lamp Giveaway!

Go Back   Homesteading Today > Livestock Forums > Sheep


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 03/14/10, 03:41 AM
Shygal's Avatar
Unreality star
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: New York
Posts: 9,879
Premier1 electric net fencing questions

I've a few questions about using this net fencing on sheep, I have read that many of you like it a lot.
Some of you seem to have different opinions on whether you need to mow under the fence or not?

Anyway, my dumb questions

Is solar or battery better to charge? AC is not an option at this time.

The joules, what is enough to keep sheep in and dogs out?

For the battery powered ones, the batteries are rechargeable, yes?

Are there battery powered ones that recharge with a solar panel? Looking on their site it appears so, but I don't really know the difference between a solar charger and a solar rechargeable battery one

How much will one battery keep charged and for how long?

__________________

Recognize the beauty in things, in creation, even when thats difficult to do.
Be loving, show compassion. Create while we're here.
Enjoy this life, be in this life but not be of it.

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03/14/10, 08:16 AM
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern NY
Posts: 1,180

As far as I know any solar system uses a battery. I don;t think there's a movable solar panel made that would provide enough juice to run the charger on it;s own. The solar charges the battery and the battery powers the fence.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03/14/10, 10:55 AM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681

I use elecro-net from spring until fall. I have mostly the shorter (32" or 36") fence with the plastic stays instead of the rope stays like in Rose's picture. I also have some of the taller (4 feet) that is like what Rose has in the picture. I like the shorter myself, it is easer for me to use.

I have both a Parmak 30 mile solar and a Parmak 30 mile battery. I use a deep cycle battery (now 2 years old) and only have to charge it twice per season. The battery one puts out more of a charge than the solar one, even though they are basically the same charger. I can have as many as 18 nets up, but when I get over 14, I use both chargers.

I find in spring, the grass growth is so fast that I have to mow/move every week to 10 days. Last year I used roundup on the fence and that helped a lot. I will be doing that again this year.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03/14/10, 10:57 AM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681

One thing, I have polled sheep. I would not use electro-net with horned sheep. To easy to get horns tangled in it.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03/14/10, 12:17 PM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by rose2005 View Post
I have horned sheep. Trust me, they do not get close. They can sense the net is on and do not get close enough to get zapped once they have experienced it.

Never had any problems.

Rose
I hope you continue to have good luck. A lady in the next town over had close to 100 Jacobs and lost several to the fence. Very tragic. She has switched to woven wire fencing.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03/14/10, 05:02 PM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681

Yea, I have lost one lamb to the fence and it was very sad. I can't imagine loosing several sheep to it. I imagine 100 put a lot of pressure on the pastures so they grazed too close.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03/14/10, 06:03 PM
Judy in IN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 2,533

I have electronet fencing, have two solar energizers, and one hard-wired into a barn.

First, I got the one that they promote for starting out: the 20b. It will run 4 sections of electronet, and that is it. I can use it here at the house, but it can't run enough fence for a very big area. I use it to train dogs and sheep. I tried to use electronet at the farm along the creek, but you MUST move it every week. Since I have horses, cattle, and hair sheep, I've gone to tape or electric wire.

I have TWO 52Bs; one is a solar rig, with a deep cell battery and oversize solar panel. The other 52B is hard-wired at the small barn, and runs quite a few bare wires and electronetting.

The only problem I've had with the solar 52B rig is the weight and the wires. I've used it summer and winter. I've resorted to putting it on a child's snow sled to move it. The rabbits seem to love to chew the wires, too. I've repaired the wires twice so far. I'm thinking of building a cage around the whole shebang.

I will say....when you hook the 52B up to the metal fence, it SINGS!

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03/14/10, 06:46 PM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681

The lamb I lost was a bottle lamb that was very friendly. I had gone away for work in June for 7 days, and on the 6th day he had jumped out over the fence on the side next to the neighbors. They have a little boy that just loves all the animals. What I suspect happened on the 7th day from where I found his body is that the boy was on the other side of the fence and the lamb got tangled in the fence trying to jump over it. He flailed so much and really was wound tight into the fence until it strangled him. The lamb was checked on that 7th day at 1:00 pm and was ok, when I made it back home at 7:00 pm, he was dead in the fence. Hard lesson learned.....

I have 2 30 mile Parmak chargers. They do a very good job for a battery and solar unit.

__________________

Last edited by LibertyWool; 03/14/10 at 06:48 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03/14/10, 07:03 PM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681

I don't mind sharing, it happened and I worried about it last year with another bottle lamb. It was such a relief when he went to his new home.....

I have the standard electro-net sheep netting from Premier 1. I think it is 32" tall and the largest openings are 6x6 at the top, but 6x2 at the bottom. Yes, he was with the flock of ewes and lambs. It was June, so he was just 3-4 months old. He had had so many problems. One of a set of triplets. Found frozen and revived in warm water. Colostrum deprived. Cocidia followed by an anal prolapse. And by this time he was completely healthy and finally growing, this happened. He had been in the electro-net since mid May and had been trained to it. He got more than one zap on the nose at first.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03/14/10, 08:19 PM
Judy in IN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 2,533

Just finished putting up 3 sections of electronet here at the house. I intend to get another 52B and run it out of this barn.

I have 10-11 sections.

I wanted to say that you don't always need to use T-posts. You can get those little 3 foot garden posts at Menards. They work just fine. You'll need to tie the post in the electronet fence to a post every time you change direction, to keep your fence taut.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03/14/10, 08:32 PM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by rose2005 View Post
Thanks for the info. I'll be keeping an eye on ours.

Do your other lambs touch the fence after the initial shock, or do they give it a certain distance.

Mine just dont go near after the inital jolt.

Rose
The lambs will tend to stay away after learning, and most of them are only in it for 4-6 weeks before they leave for their new homes. I sell at weaning. The ewes/llamas will eat right up to the fence and get reminder zaps on the ears every once in a while. It is funny to watch, as they whole flock will run towards the center of the field....
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03/14/10, 09:36 PM
Shygal's Avatar
Unreality star
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: New York
Posts: 9,879

Thanks for the answers I thought up another question lol
What do you do when there is snow on the ground, with an electric fence?

__________________

Recognize the beauty in things, in creation, even when thats difficult to do.
Be loving, show compassion. Create while we're here.
Enjoy this life, be in this life but not be of it.

Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03/14/10, 10:31 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Eastern North Carolina
Posts: 31,299
Quote:
What do you do when there is snow on the ground, with an electric fence?
Snow will probably short it out just like tall grass will.
What kind of sheep are you going to have?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03/15/10, 07:47 AM
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northern NY
Posts: 1,180

I've not had a problem with snow "shorting" out a fence. What tends to happen is the snow load will drag the fence down (any type of fence, not just electric) and that's when you have the problem. I have had ice build up on a single strand HT electric so heavy it finally broke the poly posts! When the sun came out the fence was fine. BTW- I got shocked good right through the ice.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03/15/10, 02:34 PM
Heritagefarm's Avatar
The cream separator guy
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southern MO
Posts: 3,912

We have the netting. We hate it. I would like nothing better than to just light all the rolls on fire, and stomp on the ashes.
It is extremely difficult to roll up. The steps are always getting tangled in the net. It gets tangled in the grass, it takes forever to set up, and it is very hard to step in in our rocky fields. It's also not very sturdy.
After saying that, does anyone want to buy our netting?

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03/15/10, 06:23 PM
Shygal's Avatar
Unreality star
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: New York
Posts: 9,879
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
Snow will probably short it out just like tall grass will.
What kind of sheep are you going to have?
Ive been planning on Shetlands or Icelandics, which has me worried about the horns getting caught in it.
How tall does the grass have to be before it becomes a problem?
__________________

Recognize the beauty in things, in creation, even when thats difficult to do.
Be loving, show compassion. Create while we're here.
Enjoy this life, be in this life but not be of it.

Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03/15/10, 07:13 PM
LibertyWool's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Maine
Posts: 681
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shygal View Post
Ive been planning on Shetlands or Icelandics, which has me worried about the horns getting caught in it.
How tall does the grass have to be before it becomes a problem?
Well, it will contact the first wire at 2". I don't notice a big drop in charge until about 6" of growth. Also, if you have a lot of dew in the morning, the fence charge will be down. As the day goes on and it dries out, the charge will go back up.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03/15/10, 09:33 PM
where I want to's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: True Northern California
Posts: 8,488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heritagefarm View Post
We have the netting. We hate it. I would like nothing better than to just light all the rolls on fire, and stomp on the ashes.
It is extremely difficult to roll up. The steps are always getting tangled in the net. It gets tangled in the grass, it takes forever to set up, and it is very hard to step in in our rocky fields. It's also not very sturdy.
After saying that, does anyone want to buy our netting?

The fence is not rolled to take it down- it is accordian pleated. I have a couple of 100 foot lengths and put it up and down by myself. Just lay it flat in the field and pick up each post and let the mesh part fold in between. When the posts are all gathered, then the folds can be tied up.
The instructions did point out that the people who have had trouble with it have tried rolling it up- they stressed that it was not good to do that.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03/15/10, 09:35 PM
Heritagefarm's Avatar
The cream separator guy
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southern MO
Posts: 3,912

@Rose
I'd love to see you move them without much trouble. And we accidently bought a ridiculously expensive brand, so they'd be too much - $200 per 164 ft. roll.

@WhereIWantTo
I do pleat it. I still hate it.

__________________

Last edited by Heritagefarm; 03/15/10 at 09:59 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03/15/10, 10:29 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Ca
Posts: 299

I worked with this stuff for a year working for a goat rental company. It is amazing but also a major pain in the butt. There are two main types of fence one has hot wires running throughout the horizontal ropes, another had alternating hot and ground wires running through that way when an animal sticks their nose through it they complete the circuit and get a bigger shock. I recommend the latter. Premier1 has some nice netting with the plastic vertical ropes these help the fence keep its shape and it doesn't sag as much.

You can't use horse chargers or anything that delivers a continuous shock it won't be as strong and will eventually melt the plastic. Net fences use pulsing chargers. I recommend getting a premier1 charger that runs off a car battery you don't have to worry about cords or the sun and you can easily swap it out and put it on a recharger.

One thing that is paramount is a good ground, if the fence isn't grounded well it won't work. Sheep are usually very good about the fences as long as there is enough food inside the fence they don't want to go near it. Wool is an insulator so some of the more clever ewes figure out that by keeping their heads down they can muscle through it.

I've never lost a goat or sheep to it but had some in pretty interesting entanglements with the fence. One doe had her neck through it and was obviously getting shocked but was content to just sit there staring at me while her muscles twitched under the shock. I've had kids and lambs tangle themselves up pretty badly in fences to the point that I was sure they couldn't still be alive, so if you have little ones always make sure to check the fence at least once a day.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03/15/10, 10:30 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Eastern North Carolina
Posts: 31,299
Quote:
Ive been planning on Shetlands or Icelandics, which has me worried about the horns getting caught in it.
Wool sheep need a higher voltage because wool is a good insulator.
I've had some sheep that would go through an 8000 volt fence.

If you can set up a small corral area and use REAL WIRE, you can teach them about electric fences, and they wont be so willing to try the net

Anything the touches the fence will "short it out"
That's not to say it won't still shock , but the shock will be much weaker

If you can stretch it tight enough to keep it 4-6 inches above the ground, the deck of a riding mower will fit underneath it so you can mow without moving it
__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:57 AM.