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  #1  
Old 08/06/08, 07:41 PM
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Underground rabbit cages

http://ressources.ciheam.org/om/pdf/c08/95605275.pdf

Thought this was way neat. I'm trying to figure out how to set one up here in the flood zone. I have the cages up four feet off the ground, but it sure is hot.
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  #2  
Old 08/06/08, 09:52 PM
 
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That's very cool. Kind of a cross between cage raising and colony raising.

I wonder if they can eventually dig through the clay pots underground and escape.

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  #3  
Old 08/06/08, 10:15 PM
 
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Oh, wow! What a fascinating idea!

I once saw a plan for a cage at front and an underground "burrow" built into the side of a bank with stonework as a retaining wall... but it would require just the right place.

Thanks for posting this, Cyng! Guess what my bedtime reading is going to be!

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  #4  
Old 08/07/08, 10:16 AM
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You are welcome! I was plumb tickled to find it.

I think the pots are actually lidded containers. I first thought they were like our flower pots turned upside down, but they are more like lidded urns.

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  #5  
Old 08/07/08, 11:26 AM
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FASCINATING!!!!!
and I don't say THAT very often!!!
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  #6  
Old 08/07/08, 12:06 PM
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AWESOME! My husband and I were just talking about figuring this very thing out yesterday! I can't wait to show it to him this afternoon. Thanks for posting it!

Tiffany

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  #7  
Old 08/07/08, 12:55 PM
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Thanks! I printed that off! I had been trying to think of some way to do something like that -- now I have an idea how to do it. I think I'm going to make chicken-wire cylinders and coat them with cement (ferrocement), then build lids.

Kathleen

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  #8  
Old 08/07/08, 03:03 PM
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Kathleen, I was thinking of that and also of earth bags with cement stucco.

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  #9  
Old 08/07/08, 03:04 PM
 
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Great find. I read Rabbit Production and they had one picture in there for a rabbit dome. I searched for a long time and never found one online. I would love to do something like this. I'm reading this at work tonight.

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  #10  
Old 08/07/08, 04:45 PM
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This is fascinating stuff! Thanks Cyng.

I've been wondering about something like this myself. But I keep running into the fear of fireats invading anything placed underground. I know there are poisons, but I don't like using any if I can keep from it. And ants could devastate a nest box of babies before you knew it.

Another thought, before we start moving the earth to accomodate these underground cells, have you thought of experimenting with insulated boxes within boxes? Utilizing woodshavings or something for stuffing the cavity between the boxes? I know that leaves out the cooling effect of ambient earth temps. But if I have to mound up earth anyway, I've lost most of the effect, right?

Gives me a lot to think about, thanks again for sharing.

Halo

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  #11  
Old 08/07/08, 05:24 PM
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Ah, when I saw that Cyng posted something, I knew it had to be good. Gonna print that off, too, and have a look at it this evening.

THANKS, CYNG!

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  #12  
Old 08/07/08, 05:32 PM
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Thanks, Pony!

Halo, ants have moved into MY house overnight, more than once. They are as likely to get into an insulated box as anything. Right now my cages are suspended from a framework with wire to thwart the ants and that seems to work. I'm thinking on how to protect underground cages from them.

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  #13  
Old 08/07/08, 08:51 PM
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Thanks Cyng. I am going to try to figure out how to make one of these with what I have.

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  #14  
Old 08/08/08, 03:17 PM
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Thankfully, we don't have fireants in my location. We do have other pests, but if the underground dens are cement that will stop most of them.

Our place is pretty flat, so mine will have to be above ground and bermed (which will still have most of the advantages of being under ground, but less likely to have drowned kits in our Oregon winter monsoons). I've got some RR ties -- I think I'll use them to support the earth at the back of the underground dens, and the supported soil can be garden beds. Then put worm bins under the wire cages. Multiple-use is good for people with small spaces. (I'm trying to think of a way to integrate the chickens into this, too, LOL!)

Kathleen

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  #15  
Old 08/08/08, 06:30 PM
 
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If I remember correctly about wild rabbit nests the tunnels are built to withstand flooding... so where they have the babies it is a higher elevation than the rest of the tunnel structure. I wonder how this type of structure can be modified to immitate that. Mother nature is ingenious and would take care of the flooding problem if it is an issue in certain locations.

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  #16  
Old 08/08/08, 07:37 PM
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I'm in a flood plain. The floor of the den would have to be at least four feet high to be safe. Doable, but not easy.

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  #17  
Old 08/09/08, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyngbaeld View Post
I'm in a flood plain. The floor of the den would have to be at least four feet high to be safe. Doable, but not easy.
Dig a pond and build an artificial hill with the dirt that comes out of the pond? You are right, though -- definitely NOT easy!

Kathleen
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  #18  
Old 08/27/08, 02:58 PM
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I'm bumping this thread because there's a good article over at SurvivalBlog ( http://survivalblog.com/ ) on building underground (or aboveground) den traps, and I though some of his ideas might be useful for our underground rabbit dens, as well.

Kathleen

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  #19  
Old 08/27/08, 04:16 PM
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How interesting! Great find!

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  #20  
Old 08/29/12, 08:49 PM
 
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I did it the way a true redneck would.



Behind my doe in the picture is a five gallon bucket. It is attached to the cage via screws on one end and another five gallon bucket on the other. I linked 5 in a chain. I drilled holes in the bottom for drainage. I buried them. So far its working well. The cleaning is becoming a problem as this doe will not do its business outside. Nothing a garden hose and time won't correct. Next one I'll build some access but this works for now.

Jason

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  #21  
Old 08/29/12, 09:00 PM
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This is a very interesting idea, although I fear the fireant problem as well. Drilling drainage holes would allow them easier access. And I can only imagine trying to clean these things out. Think I'll just stick with my original plan to build hutches for now. But I'm saving this information for the future so I can try to dabble with it.

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  #22  
Old 08/29/12, 09:22 PM
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Concret and heavy clay tile drain pipes are somtimes to be found on constrution sites or at bilders supply yards the od lengthes and cut pices are often tossed out

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  #23  
Old 08/29/12, 09:38 PM
 
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great idea. side note Ragnar Benson used a similar concept for trapping. dig out a hole in a hill & a tunnel to the side. then put in a wood box w/ a hole cut to line up on the tunnel. put a PVC pipe in the tunnel. he kept a pole nearby w/ a wood plug on the end. to check the trap he push the plug up to close the hole. then go up & open the hinges lid on the box and take what was inside. he said it mostly caught coon & fox, but bobcat and skunk were common & occasionaly otter, mink, weasels & COTTONTAIL RABBIT.

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  #24  
Old 08/29/12, 10:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pops2 View Post
great idea. side note Ragnar Benson used a similar concept for trapping. dig out a hole in a hill & a tunnel to the side. then put in a wood box w/ a hole cut to line up on the tunnel. put a PVC pipe in the tunnel. he kept a pole nearby w/ a wood plug on the end. to check the trap he push the plug up to close the hole. then go up & open the hinges lid on the box and take what was inside. he said it mostly caught coon & fox, but bobcat and skunk were common & occasionaly otter, mink, weasels & COTTONTAIL RABBIT.
Pops -funny you should mention that. I have an article coming out in Backwoods Home where I talk about the "cubby trap". You take a bucket, cut notches for the trap and put in a can of tuna with a few holes poked in it. Then you set the largest size conibear trap you can buy in there. Raccoon sticks his head in to get the tuna and snap. I have caught so many raccoons like this. I'll have to take a picture of it sometime.

Jason
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  #25  
Old 08/30/12, 12:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Jasoneakers View Post
Pops -funny you should mention that. I have an article coming out in Backwoods Home where I talk about the "cubby trap". You take a bucket, cut notches for the trap and put in a can of tuna with a few holes poked in it. Then you set the largest size conibear trap you can buy in there. Raccoon sticks his head in to get the tuna and snap. I have caught so many raccoons like this. I'll have to take a picture of it sometime.

Jason
this is different from the cubby. it is kind of like a permanent cage/box trap. if you opened it & the critter was too small or just something you didn't want to mess with you just leave it open & the plug in while it leaves.

as a dog hunter I am adamantly against cubbies (or ANY kill trap) less than 4 feet above ground. I can open a foothold and the dog will limp for a couple of days. I can even try to rebuild the set & leave a note. w/ the connibears, unless it happens right at my feet the dog will likely be dead before i can get to it.

sorry for thread drift.
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  #26  
Old 08/30/12, 12:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnie View Post
Concret and heavy clay tile drain pipes are somtimes to be found on constrution sites or at bilders supply yards the od lengthes and cut pices are often tossed out
about the drain pipe. I just happen to have a TON of PVC pipe. How much space does a rabbit need to get through? Would you have to put something non slip inside the pipe? And would this make it more difficult for kits to start coming out at about the 1.5-2 week mark?
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  #27  
Old 08/30/12, 07:15 PM
 
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I have a big bluff right behind my house , I was thinking on making something to keep the buns cooler in the summer , great idea

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  #28  
Old 08/30/12, 09:30 PM
 
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thats awesome, thanks Cyn!!!

A question for you guys that have bad winters. In this set up a water bottle or crock would freeze pretty fast. How could the clay pot be adapted for winter to keep the water liquid and constantly supplied without digging open the earth bermed pot. Wow my mind is racing over this!

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  #29  
Old 08/31/12, 12:00 PM
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I would beware of plastic, (IE PVC pipe or drywall buckets) my rabbits chew plastic like mad if they have access to it. I bought some of those plastic hanging food/water bins for fresh feeding, and the sides look like a roller coaster profile.

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  #30  
Old 08/31/12, 11:28 PM
 
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Overall (not all of you) may be the most pessimistic bunch of people I've ever encountered on the internet. LOL

I signed up here JUST so I could share this idea because I found this post with a google search. My desire to help people and share even the tiniest bit of knowledge I have has always been my weak point. Because now not only is this idea abhorrent to you all but you'd made me second guess it as well (after a lot of forethought!).

So yes, my rabbits might crap in the tunnel and they are hard to get out and they might chew the plastic and it might be the most horrible thing ever invented.

BUT

Its cheap and my bucks won't be going sterile in the heat and they certainly won't be croaking over dead.

But y'all keep being afraid to take risks!

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