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  #1  
Old 09/30/07, 01:26 PM
Mama MacDonald
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Texas (Erath Co)
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Lightbulb Rabbit shed/barn design question

We are going to build a rabbit shed. Kinda like a peaked carport. I mean how hard can it be to design a pole barn? right. Well hard enough that if you have once of those large two sided cages (14 compartments total) Hubby and I can't agree on how to do the center post. He wanted 9 poles total three on each side and three in center holding peak. But a center pole can't go in due to size of cage. Anyone have a plan on how to build one with this type of hanging cage? Going to buy posts and cement today so hope to hear from someone soon. If anything can always use extra posts somewhere else.

Marie

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  #2  
Old 09/30/07, 02:50 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Missouri
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How big is your pole barn going to be, and why not use trusses instead of poles down the center of your barn? You can put your trusses on 4 ft center and have seen them put on 8 ft center. I don't like poles in the middle of my buildings. If I wanted to hang the rabbit cages I would just hang them from the trusses right where I wanted them.
Hillbillybob

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  #3  
Old 09/30/07, 11:36 PM
Mama MacDonald
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Texas (Erath Co)
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Since my hubby isn't interested in discussing this (grrr) I took it upon myself to go to Home Depo and found someone who could give some ideas. I decided to do a one slope top (not gabled) since it will be next to mobile home anyway. Our house will block north winds and lower part of roof would shade from heat of summer sun. Finished size should be 14 ft long and 6ft wide. Will house one large hanging cage (7compartment each side 14 total). We will use 8ft lawn timbers as posts. 3 posts on each side cemented into ground. I will use 2 X 8 up top to go around roof edge and also one ridge in center. Then will add OSB on top and then have corregated metal on top of it. Will fasten with 1 inch screws with special washer on it. Then will hang cage from three rafters. Still not sure what gauge wire to hang from. For winter will staple clear plastic on sides and be able to open and close sides depending on weather (we have mild winters). Next summer will get those big roll down shades to open and close as needed.

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  #4  
Old 10/01/07, 12:31 AM
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South central Virgina
Posts: 2,137

I am pretty good at designing buildings. I have plenty of my drawings down town in the inspections office. If you would like, I will draw you a set of plans free of charge and I would enjoy doing so. I am disabled now but my drawing hand still works, LOL.
If you can post few pictures or email them to me so I can get a look at what you have and give me the maximum amount of cash you intend on spending, I would be more than happy to show you the cheapest and easiest way to do it that I can come up with, and doing things cheap but getting it done right is the way I work. I am working on the tightest budget I ever had to work with now, and nibbleing by. I got my first egg today, LOL.
Hillbillybob said to use trusses and for a small building they aren't hard or expensive to build.
14' wide mobile homes use trusses that are built from 1" x 4"s and plywood gussets.
I will be more than happy to help you out and wake this tired brain up some, LOL.
But you have to tell me about your ups and downs with growing wabbits. I want to start raiseing wabbits also. Hopefully next spring. I started with chickens last spring. Maybe wabbits next year.
Dennis

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Last edited by crafty2002; 10/01/07 at 12:33 AM.
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  #5  
Old 10/01/07, 01:35 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Missouri
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Don't cement your post into the ground. The cement will rot your post faster than if you dig your holes just a little deeper and well tamp the dirt around the post.

I have one barn that has been standing over 30 years built that way. I didn't have much money when it was built.

The barn that I built 20 years ago had to be tore down I had money bought treated Post and they rotted off at the top of the cement in just 9 years.

My last barn I built a 32 Ft deep X 35 ft wide have been up for 4 years just useing white Oak trees for post is holding up good and not showing any rot at ground level. I did treat the poles with a copper treatment mainly to keep the bugs out.

They say to set you poles now with pea gravel well tamped in so moisture will drain away from your post.

Hillbillybob

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  #6  
Old 10/01/07, 04:06 PM
Ex-homesteader
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Virginia
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Sheesh, I'm not sure if I should feel like an inventive redneck or a city slicker that just fell off the latte wagon. We bought a heavy-duty carport, stuck it in a clearing shaded by trees and that was that. I think we ended up paying about $0.53 a square foot for it.

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  #7  
Old 10/02/07, 07:53 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Northeast Alabama
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If your building gets any sun at all I would suggest you get some insulation under your tin! You can usually get some from contractors or builders that have scraps left over or even used. Rabbits can't take the heat in summer without some protection.

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  #8  
Old 10/02/07, 09:30 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
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For a shed 6'x14', I would stay with a basic shed-type roof. It's the easiest type of roof to build, especially for a 6' wide building. You will need 11 2"x6"x8' boards for the rafters. Here is a basic design that you could use to give you a basic idea: Shed plan

Here is another good design: Rabbit house

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  #9  
Old 10/02/07, 09:50 AM
Mama MacDonald
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Texas (Erath Co)
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DOn't need insulation we are using OSB under tin. Don't need 11 2X6's cause we are using 3 - 2X8's and then OSB on top so tin has something to screw too. Cost so far with cement $6, 6 poles ($12), wood screws (the good ones) ($20), metal to wood screws with the washer ($9), 2 X8's 34.00, OSB & metal (we have some on hand).

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  #10  
Old 10/02/07, 10:54 AM
Duchess of Cynicism
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbitgal
Sheesh, I'm not sure if I should feel like an inventive redneck or a city slicker that just fell off the latte wagon. We bought a heavy-duty carport, stuck it in a clearing shaded by trees and that was that. I think we ended up paying about $0.53 a square foot for it.
Sounds like me-- I just 'finished' the major part of my winter housing--bought two premade trusses at 14 dollars each, nailed (5) 2 x 4s between them, stapled chicken wire over that, then tarped the whole thing. Set it up on cement blocks to help level the 'structure' This morning, my bunns were dry and happy under their new roof--I didn't have to dodge raindrops, either!! In a few weeks, I will add trusses, and then, start building a kneewall to set the whole thing on. My 'building' at this point is 11 feet long by 12 feet wide. Needs to get longer, but I did it myself- in the dark, no less!!! Building the roof first means I did not need to ask anyone for help!!!
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  #11  
Old 10/03/07, 08:39 AM
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Location: South Central Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry W
Sounds like me-- I just 'finished' the major part of my winter housing--bought two premade trusses at 14 dollars each, nailed (5) 2 x 4s between them, stapled chicken wire over that, then tarped the whole thing. Set it up on cement blocks to help level the 'structure' This morning, my bunns were dry and happy under their new roof--I didn't have to dodge raindrops, either!! In a few weeks, I will add trusses, and then, start building a kneewall to set the whole thing on. My 'building' at this point is 11 feet long by 12 feet wide. Needs to get longer, but I did it myself- in the dark, no less!!! Building the roof first means I did not need to ask anyone for help!!!
Good for you!

Couple of questions:

What sort of tarps did you use? Are you concerned about condensation with the tarp, or have you allowed for ventilation?

Are you planning to insulate in any way for winter?

Thanks,
Pony!
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  #12  
Old 10/03/07, 11:14 AM
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: New York
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I was going to say the same thing, make sure you have planned for ventalation. What are you using for the floor? Concrete is hard to clean and holds the odors.

Dawn

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  #13  
Old 10/03/07, 11:57 AM
Duchess of Cynicism
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Ohio
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Talking

right now, the structure is completely open at either end--the winter prevailing wind will be coming in one end, which is under tree cover-- and I will be using a tarp over it to break the wind. Same for the other end, which is a few feet away from the barn wall.
The 'floor' is natural earth-- I hope to frame in, with slabwood, and put down a layer of sawdust and peatmoss to keep me from having to walk in mud. alayer of poultry wire will go down first, to help prevent pugging.

the trees, barn wall, and tarping will do a lot to break up the wind. the slope of the land will help keep the moisture from collecting. The space between the caging and the tarp 'roof' will permit any evaporative moisture to dispurse readily. The roof is low enough, if need be, I can heat a small area with a propane space heater.
I was out there at midnight last night-- no ankle deep mud, no hard wind blowing. only issue-- bumping my head on one of the purlins!!!
the tarps are those cheap blue things available almost everywhere-- Most of what I used has been previously used to cover the barn as it was going up.( one was the 'roof' for over two years!!!) One chunk covered the tractor al last winter. I did put a nice 10 x 20 foot one over the smaller peices, just to have it look nicer than a piecemeal arangement.

you know what-- If this means I am a redneck-- then so be it-- it'll match my red hair!!!

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  #14  
Old 10/03/07, 12:33 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Northern Ontario
Posts: 1,713

Last year my rabbits spent the winter in a wood frame shed wrapped in heavy plastic. They did ok here in northern Ontario. This year we built a shed 12' x 8' with just a slope roof. It has 1' opening all around that I can cover with plastic as the weather gets bad. I have a dirt floor and the post sit on those concrete deck blocks. It is also insulated as I plan on breeding all winter and it gets cold here at night in the winter, -45 C sometimes.

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