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Old 12/13/12, 09:35 PM
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: New Hampshire
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Sheep in with the pigs

I am considering raising a Katahdin Lamb or two to put in the freezer next year, however the only area I have to put them would be in with the pigs. I will have 6-8 pigs at a time in approximately one acre pen. Will the pigs and sheep play well together? I could get them as piglets and lambs around thew same time so they grow up together but I am concerned that the pigs will be too rough for the lambs and end up having mutton before I get any.

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Old 12/13/12, 10:59 PM
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Location: Greaney, MN
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id be more concered about what you are going to feed everyone. Sheep cannot have copper in their diet, and Im told that pig feed shouldnt be given to other animals (Im sorry... i cant remember why as i dont raise pigs)

I only know of one person that has both pigs and sheep and they are penned seperately.

Can you split your pen so that your Kat can have a part and the pigs the rest? I currently have my little flock of 17 in an acre pen. when we first started out, my Kats would roam the yard as we only had a few.

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Old 12/14/12, 05:47 AM
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Sheep and pigs co-graze very nicely. Currently we are sheepless but we have grazed our ship with our pigs for years. They do fine together. In the winter on the winter paddocks you might want to separate them and during lambing season the ewes should be in a separate paddock from the pigs until the lambs have their feet under them. A newly dropped lamb is just to tempting for a pig to come along and bite. That is how pigs explore their world and it can result in problems if the lamb doesn't object.

Our soils have very high levels of copper and the sheep do fine with that. We don't provide copper to the pigs other than what their getting from grazing, veggies and dairy. The sheep do fine eating those same feeds.

Conversely, sheep have a much higher tolerance for salt than pigs. Care should be done about salt licks. Mostly the pigs ignore them if they're pure salt. Don't use sweetened mineral blocks or the pigs may gorge on them and get salt sick.



Cheers,

-Walter Jeffries
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/

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Old 12/14/12, 06:52 AM
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Keeping sheep with pigs only works if you are just grazing like highlands does. If you are feeding slop or commercial pig feed, then there could be a problem, and yes, an adult pig will eat a newborn lamb. I lost a goat that way once that had slipped through the fence into the pig run.

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Old 12/14/12, 09:18 AM
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(formerly Laura Jensen)
 
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Originally Posted by highlands View Post
In the winter on the winter paddocks you might want to separate them . . ..
Hi Walter, I'm curious why you'd separate when they're in the winter paddocks? What's different about the winter paddocks that would necessitate separation? Thanks! -Laura
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Old 12/18/12, 09:12 AM
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I think what Walter may be referring to as far as a winter paddock is the fact that a paddock is much smaller than a pasture.

Some people will bring their animals in closer to home for ease of feeding in the winter time. the animals dont have the space to roam that they are used to and easily become bored. thats when deaths occur.

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