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  #1  
Old 07/01/11, 04:24 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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Field Peas

Was thinking of adding field peas to the livestock menu. Called a couple of feed stores here; they didn't know what I was talking about.

Anyone know where I might find them?

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  #2  
Old 07/01/11, 06:27 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: MO
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If you mean the ones like Austrian winter pea or the ones like dry soup peas, they are usually only sold in a mix for pigeons...

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Old 07/01/11, 07:25 PM
 
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I buy organic field peas from Countryside Natural products. http://www.countrysideorganics.com/p...7&cat=4&page=1

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Old 07/02/11, 10:13 AM
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Location: Nampa, ID
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I use field peas in my rations. They are the only lentil that does not need extruded before adding them in. They are a great replacement for sow/boar and grower/finisher rations of Soy Bean Meal. However, feeding them to nursry pigs could cause a little slower growth.

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Old 07/03/11, 02:09 AM
 
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I went looking for fresh sweet peas in the pod. Went to big chain grocery stores and Latino grocery stores. No one had them.

I've been told that they're now seasonal. Temps here are up in the hundreds April to October. I live in central Arizona.

Sweet peas were always available when I was growing up. The old timers must have known something that folks today don't!

So, looking for a different product!

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Old 07/04/11, 06:47 PM
Sugarstone Farm
 
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Location: Minnesota
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Did you call feed stores or feed mills? I'd be surprised if you couldn't find someone who knew what you were talking about. The folks around here at the feed stores don't know much, but the old timer at the mill knows most everything.

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Old 07/06/11, 11:31 AM
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Location: MS
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What about a southern cowpea like black-eyed peas. They can handle the heat but I don't know about the soil type. They provide a larger bushy plant about 30" cubed as well as the peas. We use them in the south for human and livestock feed as well as making hay from the vines. They are great protein and as legumes improve the soil by fixing nitrogen.
The easiest way to get seed is to buy dry ones in the grocery store and plant them. They germinate almost as well as feed store seeds do.

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Last edited by mitchell3006; 07/06/11 at 11:32 AM. Reason: Adding source.
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Old 07/06/11, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogo View Post
Was thinking of adding field peas to the livestock menu. Called a couple of feed stores here; they didn't know what I was talking about.

Anyone know where I might find them?
You don't say where you are.
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Old 07/06/11, 04:35 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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The owner of the feed store I use had the best answer. He said I have tons of
free feed on my property and he was right. Many mesquite trees. My free roaming equine eat the pods/beans as far up on the trees as they can reach!

Can't believe I didn't think of it. The indians have used mesquite beans/pods so
many ways. I feel so dumb!!

Here in the desert of central Arizona the growing season is 12 months a year. Certain plants for certain seasons. (Two seasons -- warm and warmer!) But, I've never been into gardening. Perhaps that could change in the winter when we're out of the hundred degree temps.

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