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  #1  
Old 10/29/07, 09:58 PM
Charleen's Avatar
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Cost of milk for feeding pigs

We feed the pigs our fresh goat milk. Butchering time is here and we've kept excellent records of all purchased feed, hay & grains. We've kept track of the amount of goat milk that they've consumed (over 700 gallons of milk) but we're stumpted as to what monetary value this is.

Current cwt for cow milk is $21.63 in NY. Are we out of line to use this figure? Or do you have another suggestion?

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Old 10/29/07, 11:35 PM
 
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I've got several customers who buy feeders from me or cull sows to use the waste milk...I don't no exactly what this means but every dairy seems to have some unsellable product that is excellent hog food....they never feed sellable milk as the cost of the milk is some much more profitable than pork, the hogs get silage and beef pellets when no milk is available...... So most farms consider the milk free....

I have several options for freeor cheap milk and whey to feed to my hogs, but fed. regs consider the feeding of off site dairy that is not transported chilled and stored chilled on your farm in inspected tanks as a major no - no. ( I took a state Ag. inspector on a tour and pointed out what I was doing and he about fell out, I could have hid the tank if I knew I couldn't do it.)

I would have to spend $3000 set-up and about 600 more every year to feed free milk, so it the most expensive free feed i'd every seen.

If you are milking on your farm you can skip this reg. and have an advantage over all of us. If you goats are selling some milk and kids and paying the bills as-is, you have a real value added product from them.

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  #3  
Old 10/30/07, 07:07 AM
 
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Charleen, does is really matter. Your milking the goats anyway, what else would you do with the milk?

I milk 9 cows in a split calving so that I'm milking 12 months of the year. The sole purpose of this is to feed my pigs. The value of the calves covers the costs of feeding the cows and running the cowshed, my pig feed bill is negligable and I make good money out of the weaner pigs. Plus I get to drink "real" milk and eat excellent pork and beef.

I guess it depends on how you look at it.

Cheers,
Ronnie

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  #4  
Old 10/30/07, 05:53 PM
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My interpretation of Charleen's question is that she is trying to put a dollar figure to all the inputs she used to raise her pigs.
I don't know if the cow milk price is a good measure. For one thing, the current milk price is an aberration, much higher than the year-in year out averages. Perhaps you could get the best info on goat's milk value by posting just that question in the Goat Forum?

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Old 10/30/07, 06:52 PM
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I think dairy farmers are getting around $15 to $18 per hundred weight for milk. That would be a wholesale and thus low number for your calculation range. Retail is the upper range number. Have fun.

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Old 10/31/07, 12:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlands
I think dairy farmers are getting around $15 to $18 per hundred weight for milk. That would be a wholesale and thus low number for your calculation range. Retail is the upper range number. Have fun.
Walter-Dairy farmers are currently getting $20 to $21 per Hundredweight. A retail grocery store price of $3.79 a gallon multiplied by 11.2 gallons per hundredweight translates to a retail price of $42.44 per hundredweight.
These are things I am painfully aware of, LOL.
Still, Goat's milk is not cow's milk. Maybe it's worth more, maybe less I'd like to hear from the Goat Folks what the value of their milk is.
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Old 11/01/07, 02:38 PM
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Thank you all for your replies. I agree that it's unreasonable to charge current cwt price for the milk we've fed to the hogs, however, we wish to attach some type of price to the milk, since we'd have to provide other feed to them if it wasn't for the milk. I realize that we're not going to get rich on this.

In the past, we've totaled our expenses (less the milk), added 25% and then divide this by the weight of the pig to figure the price per #. Buyer is responsible for all butchering costs, since this varies per individual (amount of smoked meats they want, sausage,etc.) Doing it this way, it's barely paying for the cost of raising the one we keep, which is why I wanted to account for the milk. For us, if we didn't have the goat milk, we wouldn't raise hogs to sell, we'd just raise what we need for ourselves.

Clear as mud? Thanks again. :1pig:

By the way - pigs went to the butcher yesterday. We had no problem at all getting them onto the trailer, but when it came time to unload, all they did was circle circle circle inside the trailer. It was sad to see them go (we send them all in the fall) but they were happy and healthy while they were here - lots of fenced in garden to uproot, pumpkins, fermented grains, acorns, apples, mudpuddles.

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  #8  
Old 11/01/07, 05:48 PM
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I sell goat milk for $7.00 a gallon. I have to turn customers away. There are those in the area selling it for more.....as high as $12. I have been told in the metro areas. I am way in the sticks and people have been willing to drive hundreds of miles if I have it. But my local customers keep me sold out.

I plan on feeding pigs out with some of it next spring as I will have a wealth of it and want milkfed pork along with milkfed goatmeat.

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  #9  
Old 11/01/07, 06:26 PM
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When we were selling goat milk commercially last year, the price we got was around $22.00 per hundredweight.
Selling to individuals off the farm, we get about $5.00 a gallon. A LOT depends on your location.
You might just figure up how much you had in the milk per gallon.

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  #10  
Old 11/02/07, 01:10 AM
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Well There you go! Real world info you can plug into your enterprise accounting to determine if an individual enterprise on the farm is profitable or being carried by the other enterprises.
Smart to take that Enterprise Analysis approach Charleen.

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  #11  
Old 11/02/07, 04:24 AM
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Presuming you're not keeping goats just to feed pigs, you might try to figure out how much extra you have to feed the goats to produce the milk. I find that when I cut my girls back to milking once a day, they eat a lot less, and produce a lot less too. Works for me.

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  #12  
Old 11/05/07, 06:11 PM
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Last I heard from a Vermont organic goat dairy it was going to NYC at just over $40/cwt. That was last year, sometime in the mid summer. If I were doing the figures I'd go with $20/cwt at a minimum.

Jennifer

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  #13  
Old 11/08/07, 01:56 PM
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How about a different approach?

The amount of pig feed AND goat feed together cost $x.

The GROSS RETURN is the amount of milk the household drank (1 gallon of milk a week, worth $4 per week for 16 - odd weeks?) plus (300?) pounds of pork worth ($600?). The value of the food for the house will give you the gross return.

The feeds combined would give you the cost, and the value of the milk and meat the family had to use would give you the gross income. Subtracting the cost of the goat/pig feed from the gross income will give you your profit.

OH!

Edited to add:

Add in the sales prices of the baby goats and the value of any eaten goats and any manure you might be using.

For instance, some years I use bedding from the hen house on the blackberries instead of fertilizer. I figure I would have used $10 worth of fertilizer, so the chickens just saved me $10 which was credited to my return from the chickens.

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Last edited by Terri; 11/08/07 at 02:15 PM.
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