cattle panel fencing questions - Homesteading Today
Homesteading Today

Go Back   Homesteading Today > Livestock Forums > Goats


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 06/28/10, 03:04 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 126
cattle panel fencing questions

A lot of people on this forum advocate livestock panels as fencing material, especially for bucks. I mostly use electric fencing, and currently have electric wire separating the buck (and bucklings) from the does. Its working fine for now but it may not hold up in rut. So I am thinking about using cattle panels together with an electric wire or two to keep goats off panels.

Questions:

Could I use cattle panels only on the border between the buck and doe pastures and use electric fencing for the other sides of the buck pasture, or do you think the buck would challenge the fence on all sides and not just along the border with the does?

What do you use to fasten the panels to T-posts? Would plastic cable ties work?

What do you do about the 1/2 inch stubs of wire that stick out on both ends of the panels?

What do you use to cut the panels, and then what about sharp edges?

Which side of the T-post do you attach the panels to: the studded side or the T side?

Thanks

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06/28/10, 03:15 PM
Pony's Avatar
Shifting My Paradigm
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: South Central Missouri
Posts: 19,266

I don't have answers to all your questions, but re: which side should be strongest, make it the one that's betwixt bucks and does. Last year, our sweet little docile buckling jumped the fence to get to his lady love.

This year, he's a stinky but still sweet yearling who will probably walk right over that fence when he goes into full rut.

Plastic cable ties are totally inadequate as sole fasteners of the fence. Maybe they'd be okay reinforcements, but you're better off picking up the fasteners made for attaching fencing to t-posts. I don't recall the name of them, but they're heavy gauge wire, shaped like a "C" with the ends hooked over. Sort of look like miniature water bottle bales.

Fold over sharp ends of wire.

Attach the wire to the posts so that the cross-wires on the fence are on the studded side.

__________________
Pony!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06/28/10, 03:17 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 6,058

A lot depends on your buck. Mine were separated from the does strictly by electric, and never had a problem, but not all are that way. The cattle pannels can be put on t-posts, I would think the reallly heavy duty zipties would work, but I would make sure the panel was on the same side of the post as the buck so he wouldn't stand on the panel and break the ziptie. Honestly, the t-post clips are very inexpensive, so they would be my first choice. Put the panel on the t-side so the zipties are between the studs. This makes it harder for the buck to push up on the panel to try to slip under.

I've cut the panels with a metal blade on a jigsaw, but would probably use my sawzall now that I have one. The sharp edges, I suppose could be sanded, but I just attach them to the end posts where the goats can't get to them.

The ends, I would probably just overlap and use your zipties to hook them together. An electric backup is always great.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06/28/10, 03:45 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: OKlahhoma
Posts: 1,020

If you purchase t posts they should come with pre bent fence clips like a V with tails at the tops take about 2 minutes to put on.

In theory depending on if you have access to electric where you are building the pen you can use a grinder to file down the edges, you can you bolt cutters to cut the panels. I say in theory because I have asked for hubby to do this for 2 years and I still catch clothing or sometimes skin on those stinking metal burs.

We put our cattle panels on the studded side with the panel between the post and the animal for additional support.

Cattle panels cost more then wire fencing but I have seen what some goats did to wire fencing prior to deciding what we were going to use. We started out with what we could afford and add 2 or 4 panels which can greatly enlarge the area if you start small.

You can also use a cut peice of cattle panel as a gate with the screw type D rings as hinges and a double ended clip on the other side.

PS plastic zipties can become brittle in the sun after a couple of summers I had to replace many on my chicken coup this summer.

__________________

Last edited by luvzmybabz; 06/28/10 at 03:46 PM. Reason: added info
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06/28/10, 05:05 PM
KimM's Avatar
Student of goatology.
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 3,130

[QUOTE=edmonds;4501500] -A lot of people on this forum advocate livestock panels as fencing material, especially for bucks. I mostly use electric fencing, and currently have electric wire separating the buck (and bucklings) from the does. Its working fine for now but it may not hold up in rut. So I am thinking about using cattle panels together with an electric wire or two to keep goats off panels.

Questions:

Could I use cattle panels only on the border between the buck and doe pastures and use electric fencing for the other sides of the buck pasture, or do you think the buck would challenge the fence on all sides and not just along the border with the does?
I would just do the whole pen.
What do you use to fasten the panels to T-posts? Would plastic cable ties work?
No, the sun will degrade them fast. Use wire or get the T-post clips.

What do you do about the 1/2 inch stubs of wire that stick out on both ends of the panels?
I take needle nose pliers and curl them around.

What do you use to cut the panels, and then what about sharp edges?
Bolt cutters then use an angle grinder to blunt the cut ends.

Which side of the T-post do you attach the panels to: the studded side or the T side?
I attach the panel to the studded side and that is to the inside of the pen.
Personally I have several stands of electrotape for my Nigerian bucks and thier pen is adjacent to the doe's. They don't challenge it but some most certainly would.

Thanks[/QUOTE

__________________
Cloven Trail Farm
Lord help me be the person my dog thinks I am!

Ja-Lyn's Radio Flyer, aka "Rad" on his 17th birthday.
9/14/93 -12/3/10.
Rest peacefully my soulmate, I'll love you forever.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06/28/10, 06:22 PM
sammyd's Avatar  
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Central WI
Posts: 5,064

We use an electric net between the bucks and does and it has held up 2 years running.
We use cattle panels as part of the perimeter and only run an electric wire if we use shorter panels.
We put the panels on T Posts with wire twists. Cable ties don't hold up well outside and will get brittle. We also make sure the panels are on the side of the post facing the goats which is usually the studded side.

__________________

Deja Moo; The feeling I've heard this bull before.

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06/28/10, 07:16 PM
Minelson's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 24,098

I tie mine on the posts with twine

__________________

Teach only Love...for that is what You are

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06/28/10, 07:25 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Alabama
Posts: 126

Do you overlap the panels by a few inches or abutt the panel end on the T-post?
Can the T-post clamps fit over 2 panels?

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06/28/10, 11:14 PM
Oat Bucket Farm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Kansas
Posts: 6,144

All of my panels are tied to the t-posts with baling twine as well.

__________________
Blog
Trailer
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06/28/10, 11:46 PM
KimM's Avatar
Student of goatology.
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 3,130

We overlap by one section, or about 6 inches. Yes the clips will fit over 2 panels but tightly. We use heavy channel locks to grip and sort of ratchet the end of the slip around the panel. I can get a picture if it helps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by edmonds View Post
Do you overlap the panels by a few inches or abutt the panel end on the T-post?
Can the T-post clamps fit over 2 panels?
__________________
Cloven Trail Farm
Lord help me be the person my dog thinks I am!

Ja-Lyn's Radio Flyer, aka "Rad" on his 17th birthday.
9/14/93 -12/3/10.
Rest peacefully my soulmate, I'll love you forever.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06/29/10, 12:34 AM
Laverne's Avatar  
Join Date: May 2008
Location: oregon
Posts: 1,108

A cordless drill with a grinding head can be used for sharp edges. To use a cattle panel as a gate I use brass snaps and snap it shut at a T post.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06/29/10, 01:53 AM
PNP Katahdins's Avatar
sheep & antenna farming
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: far SW Wisconsin USA
Posts: 2,656

I would suggest using combination panels instead, which have smaller holes at the bottom, to keep kids out too. Cost is a little higher but worth it to us. Our dry lot is made this way. We overlapped the panels a little and made fasteners out of wire pieces cut to the right length. T posts work great with these.

Start with the side between the buck and does. If you have a problem on other sides, do them too.

Peg

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06/29/10, 03:52 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cosby, TN
Posts: 806

Two words- bull panels.

I use cattle panels for everything. Last year, my old buck decided that he was going to continue to stick his head through the fence, so I had to find another way. Then, I found I needed a panel to put in front of the hay bale so the girls would not break the welds by standing on it.

My local co-op has bull panels which are the same length, but have smaller spaced cross bars, slightly taller and are much heavier gauge. I bought one to use and it works very well, so we are going to buy several to use on the fenceline between the bucks and does for fall. Whew!

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:23 AM.