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  #1  
Old 03/01/09, 06:22 PM
 
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Least diease resistant goat

Someone told me that Nubians are the most likely breed of goats to get disease... I guess the least disease resistant. I have Nubians and never had a problem....mouthy yes!!!, but healthy. Has anyone heard of this?

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  #2  
Old 03/01/09, 06:28 PM
 
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My Nubian is mouthy but healthy. I don't know where they got that info as any goat breed can be unthrifty. Its not the breed that causes it, its the management or the lack there of.

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  #3  
Old 03/01/09, 06:41 PM
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I also don't think that is true. You will find disease prone goats in almost every breed. My opinion is that they are more common in herds where the goats have been coddled in the extreme and every single goat is kept alive at all costs, and the weakling bucks are kept for breeding because they are friendly from being bottle fed in the house, so are now the family pet.

However, here in the north, I have foudn that Nubians don't do as well. It isn't that they're disease prione, it's that they're a tropical breed adapted for hot weather. The large nose, the ears, these are mechanisms for getting rid of excess heat. In the north, they become avenues for nose colds and frostbite.

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Old 03/01/09, 07:06 PM
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When I was in 4-h, I was told that the disease (which they called simply 'abscesses') was mainly found in nubians and only rarely in other breeds. I couldn't believe the misinformation thats floating around out there with goats and that the 4-H group is spreading such information - I told the 4H leaders that the disease is called CL and that it is commonly found in all breeds exposed to it - but since nubians are more common that's why you hear of it being in nubians more often... and the fact that boer herds are meat so they don't care 'as much' as a general rule. None had heard of testing or disease management... UG.

But no, no one breed is more susceptible to disease. It's all in the management and husbandry.

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  #5  
Old 03/01/09, 08:04 PM
 
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Location: Arkansas/Texas border
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I think it mainly depends on how well you take care of them. We have LaManchas and Nubians, and the LaManchas kids seem very sturdy when they hit the ground, but that doesnt necessarily preclude the Nubians overall. Oddly enough our healthiest goat is a little Boer/Pygmy wether who is a companion for our LaMancha buck!!! He is extraordinarily healthy little guy and is very worm resistant etc.

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  #6  
Old 03/01/09, 08:24 PM
Alice In TX/MO's Avatar
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We have:

2 Alpines
3 LaManchas
1 MiniMancha
1 Nubian
1 ND Buckling

Very few health problems after I learned good management. Still learning, too.

dairygoatinfo.com has the greatest archive of management tips.

Yes, I do test for CAE. Yes, I do vaccinate for CDT and staph.

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  #7  
Old 03/01/09, 08:51 PM
 
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Even in the tropics we have our share of problems with the nubians.Nubians do poorly if allowed to stand on ground 24,7,kept on elevated flooring,need more salt intake.Most have horns,is believed the horns also help to disperse heat.True they are a tropical breed but management is the key no matter where one farms this breed.

Agriculture supports life & Agribusiness feeds life:
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  #8  
Old 03/02/09, 12:15 AM
 
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Location: Montana
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I don't think Nubians are more prone to disease than the other breeds. There is a genetic disease, G8S that is breed specific, but that can be prevented by not breeding two carriers. I've actually had less problems with my Nubies than the other breeds with regards to milk fever. Like others have said, it's more of a management issue. Nubians do best when the herd is mainly Nubian. I have a friend who had problems getting proper weight and growth on her Nubies when they were greatly outnumbered by pushy Alpines. They did better when she penned them seperately.

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  #9  
Old 03/02/09, 04:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubel View Post
Someone told me that Nubians are the most likely breed of goats to get disease... I guess the least disease resistant. I have Nubians and never had a problem....mouthy yes!!!, but healthy. Has anyone heard of this?
What I've noticed is that the Nubians at least in this area seem to lose fitness the most over the long winters. I figure it's due to the fact that they have very little hair/fur. They also seem to carry less muscle and fat as a rule. This could be due to the fact that they are also the best milkers amount wise generally.

But This really isn't about disease per say more about the make up of the goat. Could it be that crosses are generally healthier than a pure breed and most of the non-nubian have crosses of the same in their lineage? In other words the others aren't "pure" but the nubians are?
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  #10  
Old 03/02/09, 05:55 AM
 
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goatkid, that is funny what you say about "pushy Alpines"!! Our one Alpine doe is very pushy, curious, and the herd leader! And the Alpine wether that is the companion for our Nubian buck is extremely pushy!!! I thought that was just them, and not necessarily a breed characteristic! LOL!

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  #11  
Old 03/02/09, 06:04 AM
Alice In TX/MO's Avatar
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From what I've read over the past two years of goat ownership, Alpines are notorious for their attitudes!

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  #12  
Old 03/02/09, 08:05 AM
 
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The first year I had goats, I bought 3 Alpine doelings and several Nubians. I put a few bowls in their pen to feed grain. The Alpines would each hog a bowl to themselves and push the other goats away. Nubians, on the other hand, will share a bowl of grain. I sold the Alpines. I used to have an Alpine-Nubian cross doe who was the undisputed herd queen. She was the only Alpine cross, so the Nubies were able to hold their own at feeding time.

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  #13  
Old 03/02/09, 08:16 AM
 
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The goat in your barn that you love the most and paid the most for will be the one to get sick first ...doesn't matter which breed it is.


Most of the above is hogwash. If you buy a good goat disease free , feed it well , vet it well , correct minerals etc you will have a good goat .

if you buy a poor auction barn goat feed it well , vet it well ,correct minerals you usually wind up with a sickly auction barn goat.


Patty

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  #14  
Old 03/02/09, 11:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stanb999 View Post
What I've noticed is that the Nubians at least in this area seem to lose fitness the most over the long winters. I figure it's due to the fact that they have very little hair/fur. They also seem to carry less muscle and fat as a rule. This could be due to the fact that they are also the best milkers amount wise generally.
The opposite is generally true, actually. A nubian is a dual purpose breed, producing generally the least milk of the large breeds (though with higher butterfat). The top milkers are generally saanen and alpine. As a breed, they generally also pack on more muscle for good meat production as well. If you look at a well bred nubian next to say a swiss breed, you'll notice an extreme difference in muscle mass between the two breeds. The only nubians I've seen have a nice fluffy coat just like any other goat I've encountered. If they're not holding weight or muscle mass through winter I'd question management and husbandry first.
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French and American Alpines. CAE, Johnes neg herd. Abscess free. LA, DHIR.
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  #15  
Old 03/02/09, 04:05 PM
 
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Location: indiana
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[QUOTE=Patty0315;3656909]The goat in your barn that you love the most and paid the most for will be the one to get sick first ...doesn't matter which breed it is.


So True, unfortunetely.

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  #16  
Old 03/02/09, 04:32 PM
Lonesome Doe Nubians
 
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Since there is more than twice as many boer and nubian and crosses of each, goats in the country than any other breeds, and likely all other breeds combined....perhaps there are more sickly nasty boers and nubians out there because of share numbers of poor managers ???

All of us have visited local farms that of course have nubains that are raised in the most pathetic of conditions, they are still alive.

I woud bet the hardiest breeds are true spanish does, who can live through west Texas temps and thrive, successfully nursing kids each year to weaning.

As you can tell on this forum and others, most illness and disease doesn't come from the goat it comes from the owner who manages them.

Vicki

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  #17  
Old 03/02/09, 05:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians View Post

As you can tell on this forum and others, most illness and disease doesn't come from the goat it comes from the owner who manages them.

Vicki
so true (unfortunately for the goat)
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  #18  
Old 03/02/09, 06:25 PM
 
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Location: Eureka, California area
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The least disease resistant goat is the goat which you paid the most for. OR its the FREE goat that FIRST captured your heart and soul and then proceeded to cost you a college tuition in vet fees for various and assundry problems.

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  #19  
Old 03/03/09, 05:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mygoat View Post
The opposite is generally true, actually. A nubian is a dual purpose breed, producing generally the least milk of the large breeds (though with higher butterfat). The top milkers are generally saanen and alpine. As a breed, they generally also pack on more muscle for good meat production as well. If you look at a well bred nubian next to say a swiss breed, you'll notice an extreme difference in muscle mass between the two breeds. The only nubians I've seen have a nice fluffy coat just like any other goat I've encountered. If they're not holding weight or muscle mass through winter I'd question management and husbandry first.
Maybe, but here in the temperate rain forest of northeast mountains where ice is as common as snow. Did I mention we get a lot of snow? They just don't manage to do as well. Here you really need a critter that gets at least really thick hair. But the ones that thrive get wool like underfur and a thick coat of thicker guard hairs. The fur on the good ones is in excess of 2 1/2" long and it all stands strait out... Kinda like a big poof ball. LOL.

I totally agree that husbandry is key to survival. But the question wasn't about mere survival. I took it to be a question about the goats that thrive the best. IMHO this area isn't very good for pure breed Nubian.
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  #20  
Old 03/03/09, 06:01 AM
 
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[QUOTE=billygoatridge;3657941]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patty0315 View Post
The goat in your barn that you love the most and paid the most for will be the one to get sick first ...doesn't matter which breed it is.


So True, unfortunetely.
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