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  #1  
Old 12/03/11, 10:55 AM
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A donkey to ride?

My children would LOVE to have a horse to ride.
I'm not to keen on horses around young children or any children really.

We have 10 goats, chickens, rabbits, etc... and we enjoy having animals.... I was thinking maybe a donkey for the children to ride would be a better idea (vs. a pony or horse)

Can you direct me to some good information/ sites/ or your own experiences with donkeys and children?

I am also assuming they will get along with the other animals???

I am also thinking due to my son weighing 130lbs a mini donkey would not be our best bet.

Think a good christmas gift for our family....

Also what should I steer away from?
I don't think Storey's has a book on Donkeys, but I wish they did....

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  #2  
Old 12/03/11, 11:11 AM
 
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We had a donkey out here that was big enough for a man to ride, and they did. They did until Bill got tired and then he just froze up. I have seen grown men, experienced riders, walk into camp because Bill got tired. He was great and did not have a mean streak in him. You did have to know his quirks. If I put a rope on him I could do anything with him. If I put a halter on him, he would drag me down the side of the barn, against a fence, or anything else that was handy. He was really big so I couldn't stop him with a halter. I guess they are like any other animal, be wary of the "perfect" donkey and enjoy your donkey, just be careful as with any animal with size to it.

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  #3  
Old 12/03/11, 11:27 AM
 
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We have had riding donkeys the past 20 years. Its what I choose for our kids to ride as donkeys and kids seem to have a special bond.

One must remember donkeys aren't horses so don't try to treat a donkey like a horse. They think differently.

Wouldn't put the donkey in with the goats unless the donkey was raised with them.

~Mrs Whodunit

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Old 12/03/11, 02:32 PM
 
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I don't know much about donkeys, why a donkey rather than a horse or pony? If your son is 130 pounds you are going to want a fairly large donkey, I would think. They could do as much damage as a horse and tack that fits might be a problem.

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  #5  
Old 12/03/11, 03:43 PM
 
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In general, donkeys and mules can carry more weight than a horse because they have different bone structures than horses. They also do not think like a horse and can be more challenging to train, but not always. Horses respond, donkeys and mules evaluate. There are different sizes used to describe donkeys/mules: miniature, standard, large standard and mammoth. You can get a large pony-sized mule that would be great for kids by crossing a POA size horse or smaller, with a small or standard Jack (male donkey). If you have never had donkeys or mules before, don't just buy the first thing that looks cute. Have a mule-savvy person go with you. We have bred and used mules for riding for many years. If you choose to get a mule, you will most likely find that it will bond with you very closely and you will enjoy the company too. Donkeys can be more independent, and will bond with other farm animals, but mules and donkeys both need company to be calm and happy. Check out the net for lots more info on donkeys and mules. Bet wishes in your search !

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Old 12/03/11, 05:48 PM
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I cant recommend Fjords enough. Gentle with people and other animals. A very steady gentle breed. Had a donkey but had to rehome her due to aggression with other animals. Also would not have been a good ride even though broke as she was more of a do what she wanted type.

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Old 12/03/11, 10:32 PM
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For riding I would get a small regular size donkey. But for toddlers and younger kids I think mini donks might be the way to go. We just got a pregnant mini donk Every day the thought goes through my mind how great she would be with children. And wondering why more people don't have them for their kids. I would have no qualms about having my 3 year old nephew crawl all over her. She is so laid back and loves attention..but not demanding of it. Also takes treats with lips of a butterfly Take her for a walk and she just follows along. Pick up her feet, pull her tail...nothing freaks her. My goats would be gentle, but would possibly jump up. Or scuttle away. Mama-D just stands there lol!!! and when you walk away from her she comes looking for you. quietly. She gets along with our dogs just fine. And the goats, chickens, ducks and cats. We have a kitten that never leaves her side. They are best buddies. That is my experience! We love her...

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  #8  
Old 12/03/11, 10:42 PM
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Mini donks are really too small for riding much. Standard-sized donks are ridden all over the world. I would think a donkey in the 12 hh range would be suitable for the kids to ride. Keep in mind, the donkey will need to be trained to ride by someone who is an experienced rider before you throw the kids up on him.

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  #9  
Old 12/03/11, 11:00 PM
 
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They are not as comfortable a ride at the trot, with upright pasturns. They are also rather slow movers in most cases, have a hard time keeping up with a horse or big moving pony. Just have very short stride length. And while adult size people ride donkeys, it may be that donkey can be overloaded by the weight. He goes, but it is too big a load. Most donkeys are pretty small, 12hands or so. 130 pounds would be about all I would want on them, includes kid and saddle weight.

Depending on how young your children are, I would rather go with a pony or elderly horse who is more responsive to directions. Trying to get an uncooperative donkey to do ANYTHING can be very discouraging to children with short patiences. I would expect child to be more likely to QUIT riding, if they never have any fun with the donkey.

A large, but young-aged, child, will probably be better off with a big pony, horse, that is more up to his weight, cooperative, than a donkey. If you are worried about how the horse or pony does with the kids, then you need to plan time for riding lessons, spend time to insure the child is kind to the equine, giving good signals for horse to respond to. Children who are growing, not coordinated, need gentle correction when they jerk the bit and kick the horse for "go" at the same time. An adult who knows something about horses, should ALWAYS be out with the kids and equine for riding/handling sessions at home or in the field.

My children got their horse handling, riding skills corrected to not punish the horse for kid issues. Kids were not allowed to ride unsupervised until they were older, 10+, and we owned a saint of an old horse. Kids have no strength to pull on a horse who ignores them. Can easily be dangerous without adult supervision. You can walk alongside, tell jokes, have kid show you how to do a circle, stop, jump off and back on! Lots of ways to enjoy the child or children's riding sessions.

My old horse wore a mechanical hackamore with no mouthpiece, tight curb strap with the kids. Gave the kids leverage for control, but not hurting her mouth if they hung on the reins.

My kids each had their own CORRECTLY FITTED helmets, used EVERY time they worked with the horse, on the ground or riding. We still have helmet rules in place for all of us, helmet for every ride. Helmets are snug fit, chinstraps tight, ASTM/SEI approved. They are replaced as they age out, by using the manufacture date inside the helmet. Helmet is only expected to last 5 years from MANUFACTURE date. Not the sale date, not the day you start using it. We see MANY OLD helmets in brand new boxes, never used, but they are WAY older than 5 years with the sticker date inside helmet. If there is no date sticker, helmet is old or not approved. Date sticker is REQUIRED by Gov't., to know when approved helmets are made.

I have seen the NICEST donkeys/ponies/horses kick with flies or defending it's space from another animal, passing horse. Saw one horse kick from a fly and catch the little kid trying to clean the hoof, RIGHT IN THE HELMET!! Kid got knocked over, but NOT injured, no head damage. Kid did need a new helmet, but I consider that cost a cheap protection!

This helmet wearing rule is one of the big Pony Club rules about horse handling at any Pony Club activity. Came into being after some kids were hurt, one killed, in various similar situations, didn't have their helmets on while handling the horses on the ground.

Equines can give a lot of happiness, teach life lessons, be enjoyed in a variety of ways. Take the time to get children taught safe and kindly ways to work with their equine friends. Watch the kids in action with the equines, see how they develop skills and get to be a partner in movement, doing things together.

I consider that horse time as a good investment in kid development, time spent being with your kids as they develop into real people.

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  #10  
Old 12/04/11, 12:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodhors View Post

This helmet wearing rule is one of the big Pony Club rules about horse handling at any Pony Club activity. Came into being after some kids were hurt, one killed, in various similar situations, didn't have their helmets on while handling the horses on the ground.

.
While I totally agree with the routine wearing of helmets, I have to say that USPC does not require members to wear helmets during all unmounted work and not even during all riding (they are not allowed to wear helmets during vaulting).
When I was the organizer for Quiz rally, I found that members are not required to wear helmets during the barn phase even though kids are working around horses on the ground.
Also, members can attend unmounted meetings and work around horses on the ground without helmets, though they must wear medical armbands and proper footwear.

Also, if a new helmet was purchased a few years after the manufacture date and is properly stored and protected, there is no reason why it can not be used after the five year period after manufacture date. The five year period is a suggestion given for helmets in use that have not sustained an impact (in which case would need to be replaced promptly).
I know what helmets work and fit best for my daughter and I and when I find them on sale, I buy more than one (Charles Owens are expensive!) and store extras in boxes in a temp controlled place out of direct sunlight. Even if the five year period has expired, the helmets are still perfectly fine. Unless there is some major testing change through the SEI labs and something new has been found to be more effective at protecting, which really doesn't happen that often.
Unless something has changed within USPC in the last 12 months, the five year rule is not really in play, unless individual clubs make it their policy. It's really just a suggestion so that people who don't have a thorough understanding about helmets will change them frequently enough. We've been to many, many rallies and USPC activities (including champs and festivals) and no one checks the date of manufacture, just that it is a certified helmet. And really, it's rather hard to find a helmet that isn't certified at this point. Hunt caps are easily recognized and I've never seen anyone wear one except at non-USPC H/J shows.

I've not heard of any particular incident in USPC involving kids on the ground and the instigation of the helmet rule. I talked at length with Dru Malavase who wrote teh first USPC helmet rules way back in 79 and 80 and from what I know, Dru started helmet testing with the SEI labs and they started the practice of having USPC members only wear approved helmets. The kids always wore caps, per English riding tradition, but it wasn't till SEI labs started testing and certifying helmets that the USPC (thru Dru) revamped their helmet rules. Sadly, kids are still injured and killed at USPC activities even with our very protective rules but at a much lower rate than before the helmet rules were put into place. I think the rates of head injury dropped by half after the helmets were required to be ASTM/SEI certified.
Interestingly, body protectors are NOT required to be certified by ASTM/SEI and the most popular vest (Tipperary) used by eventers and pony clubbers, has not been tested or certified. Body protectors do not have nearly the protection capacity that helmets do. We have always bought Charles Owens vests, which are ASTM/SEI approved.
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  #11  
Old 12/04/11, 02:56 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
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I have been riding mules for 30+ years.

I've had a miniature donkey (33 inches):



This little donk gave small children rides at various events. He also visited folks in hospitals, going into every room.

I've had standard donkeys:



I've had a Mammoth donkey (largest member of the donkey family. Mine was 14.3 hands). He, along with my broodmare band, made a lot of mules for me:



He was 2 years old in this photo. I hadn't started riding him yet; just hopped up for the photo. I started riding him and breeding him when he was 3.

I've raised my horses, mules and donkeys all the same way. Riding the mules is like sitting on the couch. If you have a good mule, you won't see daylight between the rider's seat and the saddle in any gait.

The standard donkeys I've had were not as comfortable! The trot worse than the gallop.

The Mammoth donkey was as smooth as the mules in any gait.

The donkey will not move out like the horse or mule. He doesn't know how long he'll be worked so he conserves his energy.

The standard donkey (a jenny or gelding) is what is used for a livestock guardian. If you don't get them from a breeder of livestock guardians, they could maim/kill your stock. Goats chased into heart attack. Best to keep any new critter on the other side of a fence until you feel they will get along. Some will, some never will.

The donkey is not necessarily safer than the horse or pony. They all can kick and bite hard! What's important is to get a critter that's well trained and then have the trainer train the kids how to ride.

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  #12  
Old 12/04/11, 10:39 AM
 
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Why don't you want to go with the kids' first choice? It'd be far easier to find a horse trainer than a donkey one. Is your son still growing? If so, it might be easier to find one he can ride as he gets bigger. In this market I'd bet you would pay less for a well trained horse than a well trained donkey. Whatever you do, please make sure everyone gets lessons from an experienced horseman before the purchase of an equine.

By the way, DD received her Joshua as a Dream Factory wish. He is an APHA 15h give or take. She was a tiny thing. I'm not sure if she was even 4' tall. At 13, she's a thin 4'9". She looks great on her boy. He fits me too. Heck, our trainer, a good-sized adult man, fits him too. IMO, a QH or an APHA with a good head on his shoulders is an all around good fit, especially for kids. Personally, I prefer geldings, especially for beginners. They are not moody like mares.


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Last edited by Joshie; 12/04/11 at 11:44 PM.
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  #13  
Old 12/04/11, 04:43 PM
 
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The Approved headgear protection is mandated by the Gov't. As a person who had to wear and supply working people with approved headgear in Industrial/construction settings, the helmets HAD to be replaced when they reached the 5yr age from date of Manufacture. Broke and tossed the helmets in Supply, if they went over the 5yrs, even if never used.

5 year ages for replacement are from the helmet makers. Plastics and synthetic materials can react very strangely to a great many factors that touch the helmets, including sunshine. Plastics and synthetics degrade, dropping or letting helmets get very cold or hot, can affect the integrity of the protection. Makers are not responsible for your head when helmet is old, they don't have to warrenty the safety because helmet has aged out, used or unused, any brand name. I personally, do not want to rely on "possible" protection with old helmets. Your choice, but saving money can often come back and REALLY bite you when you need that good protection.

Been a while since I was in Pony Club, but they did helmet checks at Rallies and if helmet had no Approved sticker and date within the 5yrs of Manufacture, that helmet was not allowed to be used. Kid could not ride if they didn't come back with a helmet meeting requirements. It was STRONGLY recommended that kids wear helmets in ground work of any kind around an equine, so that got turned into a Rule, for our PC activities. Could have been an added step done in our Region.

The injuries were listed in the national PC newsletter we go, along with the PC kid who got killed (at home) working her horse to load in a trailer.

Lots of safety features, Rally rules have changed since I was the "trainer" for the Rally kids and doing lessons for the Club. I had to read Rules in detail, know them all to coach the kids and team Captain for each specific type of Rally information. Helmet use was a HUGE thing in all our PC activities.

I will agree with you on the Vests. Tipparary Eventer model CAN'T get Approved because of the side laces, which gives the terrific fit. Laces won't keep any sticks or foreign objects from spiking a rider in a fall. Eventing seems to be arguing about it, have no rules for vests, just that you have to wear vest on course.

I found PC to be an amazing blend of good and poor in dealing with equines. They stressed safety, but then would (from the National Office) mandate bizarre ways of doing things, training the PC Officials running competitons. Lots of "book smart and no common sense" teaching from the top on down. PC
A-rated kids who had no understanding (both how to do it or value in doing) of a basic warmup, before putting horse to work!

I am putting this information forward for any readers to take into helmet consideration. They can use it for their children or themselves or not, if they want. Helmets are pretty cheap now, offer the same protecting results to testing as the much more expensive model helmets. So you buy what you like, pay what you will, just like with boots or other tack.

Readers just need to KNOW the way to "read a helmet" and understand why dating is required for the consumer. Lots of poor information out there for new riders and their parents. I once saw a helmet get dropped, shattered into pieces. This was right after the OWNER said it was FINE to use that old helmet, it WOULD still take care of her in a fall. I just asked, "Do you want the pieces to glue it back together?" before walking away.

Choice is yours about helmet use, non-use, keeping your "old favorite" helmet long past being safe protection.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaInN.Idaho View Post
While I totally agree with the routine wearing of helmets, I have to say that USPC does not require members to wear helmets during all unmounted work and not even during all riding (they are not allowed to wear helmets during vaulting).
When I was the organizer for Quiz rally, I found that members are not required to wear helmets during the barn phase even though kids are working around horses on the ground.
Also, members can attend unmounted meetings and work around horses on the ground without helmets, though they must wear medical armbands and proper footwear.

Also, if a new helmet was purchased a few years after the manufacture date and is properly stored and protected, there is no reason why it can not be used after the five year period after manufacture date. The five year period is a suggestion given for helmets in use that have not sustained an impact (in which case would need to be replaced promptly).
I know what helmets work and fit best for my daughter and I and when I find them on sale, I buy more than one (Charles Owens are expensive!) and store extras in boxes in a temp controlled place out of direct sunlight. Even if the five year period has expired, the helmets are still perfectly fine. Unless there is some major testing change through the SEI labs and something new has been found to be more effective at protecting, which really doesn't happen that often.
Unless something has changed within USPC in the last 12 months, the five year rule is not really in play, unless individual clubs make it their policy. It's really just a suggestion so that people who don't have a thorough understanding about helmets will change them frequently enough. We've been to many, many rallies and USPC activities (including champs and festivals) and no one checks the date of manufacture, just that it is a certified helmet. And really, it's rather hard to find a helmet that isn't certified at this point. Hunt caps are easily recognized and I've never seen anyone wear one except at non-USPC H/J shows.

I've not heard of any particular incident in USPC involving kids on the ground and the instigation of the helmet rule. I talked at length with Dru Malavase who wrote teh first USPC helmet rules way back in 79 and 80 and from what I know, Dru started helmet testing with the SEI labs and they started the practice of having USPC members only wear approved helmets. The kids always wore caps, per English riding tradition, but it wasn't till SEI labs started testing and certifying helmets that the USPC (thru Dru) revamped their helmet rules. Sadly, kids are still injured and killed at USPC activities even with our very protective rules but at a much lower rate than before the helmet rules were put into place. I think the rates of head injury dropped by half after the helmets were required to be ASTM/SEI certified.
Interestingly, body protectors are NOT required to be certified by ASTM/SEI and the most popular vest (Tipperary) used by eventers and pony clubbers, has not been tested or certified. Body protectors do not have nearly the protection capacity that helmets do. We have always bought Charles Owens vests, which are ASTM/SEI approved.
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  #14  
Old 12/04/11, 06:11 PM
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Love the pics Rogo!! Nice

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  #15  
Old 12/04/11, 09:15 PM
LisaInN.Idaho's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goodhors View Post
The Approved headgear protection is mandated by the Gov't. As a person who had to wear and supply working people with approved headgear in Industrial/construction settings, the helmets HAD to be replaced when they reached the 5yr age from date of Manufacture. Broke and tossed the helmets in Supply, if they went over the 5yrs, even if never used.

5 year ages for replacement are from the helmet makers. Plastics and synthetic materials can react very strangely to a great many factors that touch the helmets, including sunshine. Plastics and synthetics degrade, dropping or letting helmets get very cold or hot, can affect the integrity of the protection. Makers are not responsible for your head when helmet is old, they don't have to warrenty the safety because helmet has aged out, used or unused, any brand name. I personally, do not want to rely on "possible" protection with old helmets. Your choice, but saving money can often come back and REALLY bite you when you need that good protection.

Been a while since I was in Pony Club, but they did helmet checks at Rallies and if helmet had no Approved sticker and date within the 5yrs of Manufacture, that helmet was not allowed to be used. Kid could not ride if they didn't come back with a helmet meeting requirements. It was STRONGLY recommended that kids wear helmets in ground work of any kind around an equine, so that got turned into a Rule, for our PC activities. Could have been an added step done in our Region.

The injuries were listed in the national PC newsletter we go, along with the PC kid who got killed (at home) working her horse to load in a trailer.

Lots of safety features, Rally rules have changed since I was the "trainer" for the Rally kids and doing lessons for the Club. I had to read Rules in detail, know them all to coach the kids and team Captain for each specific type of Rally information. Helmet use was a HUGE thing in all our PC activities.

I will agree with you on the Vests. Tipparary Eventer model CAN'T get Approved because of the side laces, which gives the terrific fit. Laces won't keep any sticks or foreign objects from spiking a rider in a fall. Eventing seems to be arguing about it, have no rules for vests, just that you have to wear vest on course.

I found PC to be an amazing blend of good and poor in dealing with equines. They stressed safety, but then would (from the National Office) mandate bizarre ways of doing things, training the PC Officials running competitons. Lots of "book smart and no common sense" teaching from the top on down. PC
A-rated kids who had no understanding (both how to do it or value in doing) of a basic warmup, before putting horse to work!

I am putting this information forward for any readers to take into helmet consideration. They can use it for their children or themselves or not, if they want. Helmets are pretty cheap now, offer the same protecting results to testing as the much more expensive model helmets. So you buy what you like, pay what you will, just like with boots or other tack.

Readers just need to KNOW the way to "read a helmet" and understand why dating is required for the consumer. Lots of poor information out there for new riders and their parents. I once saw a helmet get dropped, shattered into pieces. This was right after the OWNER said it was FINE to use that old helmet, it WOULD still take care of her in a fall. I just asked, "Do you want the pieces to glue it back together?" before walking away.

Choice is yours about helmet use, non-use, keeping your "old favorite" helmet long past being safe protection.
I'm not quite understanding what you're saying. Are you saying that the five year limit is mandated by the government. If so, maybe you should provide a link so it can be shared with other organizations.
I believe I was clear that the helmets we might use five years past the manufacture day are helmets that are new and unused and stored properly in the box away from sunlight and extreme temps. Since UV rays and extreme temps are the main factors in plastics and foam breaking down, maybe you could share with us what other factors would make properly stored helmets react strangely.
I'm sorry you seem to have gotten so upset. You're new here so maybe you haven't realized that all posters may contradict or question what you've posted according to our own knowledge and experience.

If, however, you were making assumptions about me keeping an old favorite helmet for my daughter past it being safe protection, maybe you'd better read my post a little better and maybe read a little more about the people on this forum before you start jumping to insulting conclusions.
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  #16  
Old 12/05/11, 07:18 AM
 
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Goodhors, LisainN.Idaho wrote a wonderful post regarding helmets and links a fantastic site. It's a "sticky" at the top of this forum.

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  #17  
Old 12/05/11, 10:28 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
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Not upset, not assuming anything. As you say, I may also firmly disagree with YOU about how long riding helmets should be kept and used. Lisa, how do you "know" when a helmet is still safe and protective? I would go with a visual inspection as being the least reliable method. Can't see micro-fractures.

My information was Company supplied, no links, to show us what was needed to be in compliance with the Gov't. rulings at the time, in our Company supplied Safety equipment for the employees. 5 years was the limit in our Company setting, and they were very firm about the safety hats being replaced if outdated. Hardhat suppliers also had the warning to replace them in the packaging, at the 5yr age limit.

So that warning "protects" the Manufacturers, because they can't control the user and misuse of their safety products. If user CHOOSES to ignore the replacement warning, then user is now responsible if equipment fails.

I am sure if you call to ask the present helmet manufacturers, they will also say 5 years is the helmet life. You will probably get some waffling about helmets "probably being protective past that age", but you WILL NOT get a firm comment that they ARE, and of course nothing in writing that older helmets will protect you. And this will be the same if helmet has been in daily use that 5 years, or never used, fresh out of the original box. Both helmets are over 5yrs old.

Synthetics or plastic can be GREATLY affected by many things. Age is just one of them. I have seen a lot of "hard" varieties of plastic that came out of boxes, just died from being old on the shelf. You open the box, try to use the item and it breaks right off. New and improved plastics and synthetic materials being invented daily. Makers can guess, but no one can warrenty them long, don't know how well they will hold up in real life. Just hasn't been around that long to gain experience with. Our Company used a great variety of plastic products, and they have a lifespan. When that time has passed, then they died. Cracked, broke under pressure, failed to work, wore out in many ways. It is just the way things work when they have jobs they perform.

That dropped helmet fracturing into pieces was given as an example. Person preparing to use it was POSITIVE that helmet makers "were just after money in saying helmets need replacing after 5 years" and quite emphatic about it. I think that helmet breaking after a fall from waist height onto cement floor was a very sobering demonstration for ALL of us. But "This is my favorite helmet, and it is only a LITTLE bit over the 5yr age. LOOKS fine to me" is something I hear ALL THE TIME.

I bring out the information I know, pass it along and walk away. Many new horse folks don't know about manufacture dates on helmets. That information NEEDS to be presented to let a buyer can be "an informed consumer" in making choices before purchase.

People EXPECT newly purchased items in nice boxes to be good forever. Lisa is obviously knowledgable, so she can do what she pleases in regard to age of her helmets. But passing on bad information about purchasing aged helmets is not helpful to beginners. They figure "If you can go a little over the 5yrs age, why should I not go even longer in use? Look how MUCH I am saving with getting old helmets and making them last much longer!!" Each time misinformation is passed along, there is a bit of change, with time of safe use getting longer and longer in the case of helmet life.

Wrecks happen in a heartbeat. Courtney Dye King with her terrible closed head injury, no helmet. Olympic level rider at a SHOW, WALKING along on the horse when he fell. She almost died, will never be the same. Could possibly have been avoided with a helmet. Many other lesser known folks hurt and injured because "Helmets make my head look fat, nobody else is wearing one" thinking. Had two incidents of kids going down right in front of me this year, with helmets ON, who where thrown into fence posts head first! Helmets prevented severe injury, sure grateful they were being worn that day. Both wore newer helmets, parents were helmet Nazis, don't use old helmets. One kid was also walking, just inside the ring, horse threw his head up at a fly and tripped himself, throwing the kid as horse went down. Other kid was riding pony at a canter, did sudden right turn while kid did not, went off into the post head first. Both nice animals, quiet, reliable, but stuff happens when you least expect it. That is why you ALWAYs have the helmet on, snugly fastened when riding.

Ok, got carried away again. In my experience, you can not expect new equine owners to read sticky's on a forum, nor to see the need for protective equipment without the advantges being pointed out to them. Horses and horse equipment is expensive to begin with, so they tend to put off buying a helmet as the last needed expense, if they even think about needing one. Certainly is the case with the many people I meet. You don't see TRAINERS or COWBOYS wearing helmets! And these people "only" Trail Ride, lead the kids around on the horse or just ride in their ring on older animals. So they are not going fast or being competitive to "need that kind of protection" while riding.

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Old 12/05/11, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by goodhors View Post

In my experience, you can not expect new equine owners to read sticky's on a forum,
Nor can you expect people to read posts that are always presented in rambling volumes with the poster ALWAYS in full blown lecture mode who consistently departs from the topic at hand to seemingly display her "greater" knowledge.

I'm not sure if you think that everyone here is an ignorant backwoods hick, but you certainly give that impression. You must be either very insecure or very young...either way, determined to let every one here know just how smart you are.
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Old 12/05/11, 10:48 AM
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goodhors, the OP doesn't have any equines in their yard at the moment and is currently looking for information on donkeys so at this time, they really have no need for a helmet. It has been my experience that one has better luck convincing people if they do it with a bit of kindness and respect rather than cramming their opinions down someone's throat.

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Old 12/05/11, 10:56 AM
 
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My opinion is that everyone with at least two working brain cells knows they should wear a helmet, however you can't force anyone to wear one with verbiage via the computer.

Anyone that rides at my farm, or one of my horses, wears a helmet and that's the best I can do.

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Old 12/05/11, 12:05 PM
 
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Let's get back to the OP's question about a donkey for kids. And I would really like to know why you would choose a donkey over a pony or horse. I have never been around donkeys. I do have some experience with mules, but packing not riding. So why a donkey?

Let's stop the rant about helmets. We've known Lisa for a long time and respect her opinion. I really doubt that the laws for hard hats and riding helmets are the same-- but this thread was about donkeys.

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Old 12/06/11, 12:12 PM
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You may want to talk with Bill Garrett over in Stillwell, Oklahoma. He always has a few well broke donkeys for sale. Look at his website at garrettjackstock.com
His kids have been competing and winning on the animals they raise. Good quality. He's been around for a long time and sports an impecable reputation.

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Old 12/06/11, 09:15 PM
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CIW, thanks, I really enjoyed that.

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Old 12/07/11, 12:41 AM
 
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=== Love the pics Rogo!! Nice ===


Thanks!


=== I would really like to know why you would choose a donkey over a pony or horse. ===


One of the reasons I've ridden longears all these years is because they won't hurt themselves and I feel safer riding them.

I happen to prefer mules because they move out better than the donkeys.

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Old 12/07/11, 11:34 PM
 
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Thanks for the web site--and loved the photos Rogo!

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Old 12/09/11, 11:56 PM
 
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For kids I'd advise an older compleatly broke horse or big pony usally these are usally cheaper or maybe free to a good home . a broke kid safe donkey will be hard to find as they are mostly used as livestock gardes and not ridden

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