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  #1  
Old 11/25/10, 06:23 PM
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How far can I travel with my Horses

In a few weeks I am moving from Florida to Missouri. I am unsure if I Should take my horses or sell them before I leave. I expect it to take me two day to make the whole trip. I only recently started owning horses and am unsure what to do with them if I have to stop overnight. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I am sorry if this question makes me sound dumb but like I said I only recently got my horses and have never traveled more than a few miles with them in a trailer

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  #2  
Old 11/25/10, 06:28 PM
 
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Many places have either a boarding stable or county fairgrounds that have stalls available for "overnighters". If you check your route and figure out about where you will need to stop, you should be able to find something.

It really isn't much of a problem, especially if the horses load easily and haul comfortably. I relocated from Montana to Kentucky some years ago with 30-plus horses and did all the hauling myself.

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Old 11/25/10, 06:39 PM
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I just moved from Delaware to Florida. When I stopped for my overnight in North Carolina, I hung a bucket of water and a hay net full of hay in front of each horse. I made sure to stop at a motel that allowed me to park right in front of my room, so I could hear any banging from inside the trailer throughout the night. The horses did jus fine!

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  #4  
Old 11/25/10, 06:40 PM
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That is not a dumb question, so no worries about that, at least you are smart enough to ask!! I checked on the distance and it looks like it is about a 20 hour trip, give or take depending on where you start and where you finish. Perfectly acceptable for horses if done properly. In fact I know people who do double or triple that distance, sometimes several times in the summer for shows.
For me, I follow the 4 for 30 rule. Stop every 4 hours for 30 minutes to let them rest their legs. The hardest part about the trip will be the standing while you are moving. When you stop, make sure they have hay and water. If they are good staying on the trailer, it is usually best to just leave them on. Especially if they can be hard to load or uncertain in new situations. The last thing you want is one to spook and get out into traffic. Very nasty outcome! Personally, I would just leave them on and give them at least 30 minutes to rest. If you are stopping for the night, they can stay on, or if you can find a bed and bale along the way that is great to.
Some others here with more hauling experiences and in the area you are going, might have other options for you. I feel two days is more than enough time to do a trip like that if you do 10 hours a day. It will be tough on them to a level, they may come of a bit stiff and sore, but no way would I sell my horses for that. But then we do have a lot of space in between things up here, so a trip like that is always a possibility! That would work for me but you need to decide what is best for you and your horses.
Good luck, have a safe trip!!

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Last edited by Harmony_Meadows; 11/25/10 at 06:43 PM.
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  #5  
Old 11/25/10, 06:41 PM
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Thanks for the answers. I know travelling with horses is common, I just wasn't sure How to do it. One other question. Should I stop periodically to take them out and walk them around?

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  #6  
Old 11/25/10, 07:36 PM
 
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I would not unload them except possibly on an overnight stop. I have had long distance haulers say they preferred not to and I also found during a lot of long distance hauls it isn't really necessary. What I did find is that blocking the trailer and putting jacks under front corners so it was really stable and did not give any motion at all when the horses moved around allowed them to relax better. I also hauled in a stock type trailer and did not tie when at all possible and found that most horses seem to prefer to face the rear rather than the front and stand at an angle.

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  #7  
Old 11/25/10, 09:11 PM
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I have used this website with success to find places to overnight with horses!

http://www.horsemotel.com/

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  #8  
Old 11/25/10, 09:25 PM
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Seconding the horse motel site. In my experience (cross country, twice) it's about 20 bucks a night, per head, add five bucks for a bale of hay. We did deadhead it once and drove straight through. Horses rarely drink much while traveling, so as my horses were eating soaked beet pulp at home, I prepared a bucketful when we left NM. First stop for fuel, we sat for about 20 minutes and let them chill and eat the beet pulp. Started another bucket. Next stop, same thing. We did stop for a few hours in a rest area but left them on the trailer. Last thing you want is to be handling (particularly for a horse newbie) a horse outside the trailer alongside the road or in a rest area unless you absolutely have to. When we arrived at our destination, I was pleased to see that the horses didn't drink massive amounts of water like they normally do when traveling.

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  #9  
Old 11/25/10, 10:53 PM
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Huntinfamily, do you have a trailer or will y4ou have to rent one? If you have a trailer, what size is it? Are you confident pulling a trailer or apprehensive?

If you have to rent a trailer and then drive that far with a unit you're uncomfortable with, it might be just as cheap and far easier to see what it would cost you to have the horses hauled.

If you're moving horses, you need to make sure what the regulations are in each state. I'm sure coggins is required but you're going to need to find out if you will require brand inspection (even if your horses are unbranded), you may need to have a livestock manifest.

In my case, the livestock manifest is the piece of paper that tells the brand inspector that I'm hauling 3 red horses which look pretty much every red horse with no visible brands or tattoos. The brand inspector checks the horses for visible brands or tattoos, he signs the manifest, I hand over $75 and I'm on my way.

Don't assume that your vehicle or farm insurance covers your horses if you're involved in an accident. Call your insurance company and specifically get coverage for the horses, in case there is an accident and be very darned clear on the terms. Typically, a insurance company requires a vet to euthanize but often, if a horse is put down at the scene by a LEO, you'll be covered but if you put your own horse down, you may or may not be covered.

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  #10  
Old 11/25/10, 11:29 PM
 
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I've done quite a bit of traveling, not just with equine, but with poultry, swine, cats, dogs, skunks, parrots, etc.

When you stop for gas, your horse gets a chance to rest without taking him out since there's no movement. I always keep pellets available to my equine as we travel and water when I stop for gas, eating, whatever. I travel with bags of pellets instead of hay. Much easier to pack and use.

I usually stop to eat at the fast food places since they have large parking areas to accommodate the 18 wheelers. I take my mount out and tie him on a 30 foot rope so he can stretch his legs and relax a bit. I sit with him while I eat.

I can't remember what it's called, perhaps someone else will, but there's a site for traveling horseman. Places to stay that have corrals, etc. I think it also comes in a paperback book form.

When I had a camper on my truck I sometimes stayed at county fairgrounds.

I've also stayed at motels, parked away from traffic, and tied my mount to my truck on a 30 foot rope. He's been able to lay down and relax. I've done this for years.

It's important for you to relax. If you're not, the horses will pick up on it.

Like someone else said, most of my equine prefer to travel facing the back, so I don't tie. It's up to you what you do.

I've never arrived at my destination with a sore mount.

I have a portable CB in my truck. Have had it long before cell phones came about. It comes in handy since cell phones don't work everywhere. One thing hasn't changed through the years -- truckers are still very helpful when you need it. And they aren't bothered by the gun on my hip! :o)

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Last edited by Rogo; 11/25/10 at 11:41 PM.
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  #11  
Old 11/26/10, 12:31 AM
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I trailered 12 horses from Texas to Maryland on a huge 12-horse van pulled by my husband's semi. About 8 hours into the trip, 2 of my mares decided it would be a good idea to fuss at one another and not share a hay net nicely (they were next to each other). I decided to put the old gelding inbetween them by unloading the offenders, moving the gelding, and re-loading the naughty girls.

Yeah, right..... ONE mare refused to get back on the trailer. At a rest area is NOT where you want to discover that your mare has a huge stubborn streak.....

We lost 3 hours getting that sassy thing in her correct spot, and it exhausted us, to boot.

Therefore: I NEVER unload horses in a strange or unfamiliar place unless I KNOW they will get back on or I have multiple horsemen to help me!

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  #12  
Old 11/26/10, 10:01 AM
 
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Agreed with costello, don't take them out, unless it's at a stable you're going to put them overnight. A lot of bad things can happen to both horses and people if they get loose. Safer for horses and people to keep them in the trailer.

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  #13  
Old 11/26/10, 10:02 AM
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Wow lots of good info. Thanks everyone. To answer some questions that some of you asked. Yes, I am comfortable pulling my trailer, I used to drive 18 wheelers so this is not an issue. My trailer is a two horse model with a small "bunk" area in the front. I mapquested my trip and am planning on stopping for the night just west of Birmingham Al. My sister lives out that way and is going to check the county fairgrounds to see if we can stay there overnight. Again, thanks for all the great info everyone. I am alot more comfortable taking them with me now

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  #14  
Old 11/26/10, 11:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Witterbound View Post
Agreed with costello, don't take them out, unless it's at a stable you're going to put them overnight. A lot of bad things can happen to both horses and people if they get loose. Safer for horses and people to keep them in the trailer.
It's actually interesting to see some of the rest stops along the Interstate through Wyoming and Montana. Occasionally, there is an area that is actually fenced along the regular rest stop, with cattle guards, completely enclosed with fencing and no pavement other than the driveway through ... grass allowed to grow up on both sides. Specifically for horse haulers.

Two in Wyoming I've seen, one in Montana that I recall and I think one in SD ...
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Old 11/27/10, 01:16 PM
 
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We used these people to transport a horse from KY to IL. Cost just under $300. They stop regularly and, I believe, let the horses out to pee. I know that I don't have enough experience transporting horses to feel comfortable doing it, especially that far.
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  #16  
Old 11/27/10, 10:26 PM
 
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I have noticed that many Cabala's have stalls or pens for horses, as well as locking kennels for dogs, if there are any on your route. We, as well as our kids have moved horses all over the country. Ou DS and DIL have been able to find bed and breakfasts all over the country that have horse facilities. The trick was to have someone standing by with a computer to give him phone numbers when he knew where he was going to stop. There is a great stockyard in Lyman ,Co that we have traded horses with our TX daughter and overnighted. I think you can find them in many places, at least out west.

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Old 11/28/10, 11:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joshie View Post
We used these people to transport a horse from KY to IL. Cost just under $300. They stop regularly and, I believe, let the horses out to pee. I know that I don't have enough experience transporting horses to feel comfortable doing it, especially that far.
Joshie, I think you forgot the link.
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