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Cattle For Those Who Like To Have A Cow.


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  #1  
Old 12/31/16, 03:51 AM
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bloat

how to avoid bloat....just had 18 calves with bloat....changed their feed slightly to increase of barley in to 600 kg of lupins and hay and the next day was a disaster....one loss and of course the best in the lot....but not to waste to the freeze

vegetable oil fixes the problem if caught early enough but if too late then it is fatal..... can pearce hide and muscle and stomach but then run in to infection and if not close enough to a vet for attention then that is not an option.

so oil on water is also an option for those mildly affected as well....give hay or straw and keep in yards and keep them moving dont let them lay down

need to remove bubbles out of stomach area and allow the stomach to go back to normal size..

Carb soda will also do it but oil appears more effective and only takes a few minutes....happens while you stand and watch.
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  #2  
Old 12/31/16, 06:36 AM
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Its been found that in the long there is a mineral imbalance in the animals feed intake.
In the past I've had a roller lick tank filled with a molasses based mineral that had teric oil mixed in. It rusted out though so I switched to the blocks. The key seems to be getting them in the habit of eating on the blocks a couple of weeks prior to use of a particular feed or pasture change.
A ration with a high roughage content is also good. Something like flax seed is a good laxative also helps.
Prevention is the key. Once a cow has bloated it seem that they are prone to do it again.
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Old 12/31/16, 07:10 AM
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Wow, for all of them to bloat that feed adjustment must not have been so minor after all. What an ordeal to have so many at once. More roughage, less concentrated feed and up the "high octane" stuff gradually. Magnesium helps with bloat prevention on rich green stuff but I don't think it is as effective on grain diet.
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Old 01/02/17, 06:35 AM
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Oil did the trick for 17 and one ended up being shot...too far gone and the meat was just fine. takes but a few minutes for the bubbles in the rumen to go away and the stomach to go back to the normal size.....but if it is too late then it is too late for the calf/cow

bought two large square bales of hay today and have introduced them back on to the grain one scoop twice per day. along with freshly cut hay.....they of course would like just the grain but they will have to eat the hay as well....and empty their feeder troughs....adding more carb soda to their troughs as well..... what a painful exercise!!
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Old 01/02/17, 10:05 AM
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A cow's digestive system isn't able to digest the foods it eats without help. When she eats, it goes into her first stomach to ferment and partially digest. It is the enzymes and microbes there that do the first digestion. After she brings it back up to chew, it goes into a second stomach where more enzymes and microbes work on it.

The microbes that live in her gut are specialized. They digest a specific type of food. When she was just a calf, she slowly introduced new foods into her gut. The microbes that grew by eating that food grew along with her. Every new food she eats, needs to have the same long time to develop the microbes that are specific to the new food.

Simply put, any change in diet for a cow needs to take place slowly and gradually. An abrupt change of diet creates an overload in her guts that her microbes can't handle. That is what causes the green manure that comes from eating Spring grasses. They pass the grass through quickly. Those that don't expel all of the new food in liquid, soupy manure, are at risk of developing bloat. The food rots, making lots of frothy gas bubbles.

The bubbles of frothy bloat are like soap bubbles in your sink. They don't want to go out the drain. That is why we treat a bloated cow with things to break up the millions of tiny bubbles into a few big bubbles that come out easily.

I always keep a few bottles of Therabloat on hand. It probably works best to break up the tiny bubbles. It contains a chemical that works like Gas-X does in humans. A couple of big burps and farts and it's over.
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  #6  
Old 01/06/17, 01:13 PM
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I mix a little pro-biotic powder in every feeding. Not a lot but enough to keep everything working.
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  #7  
Old 01/12/17, 08:35 AM
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the feed went from 5 buckets of barley in 600 kg of lupins and 1/3 roll of hay plus dry matter in paddock .........to 8 buckets of barley and 600 kg of lupins and 1/3 of a roll of hay plus dry matter in paddock. the 8 buckets of lupins was too much........... it should have been 6 buckets of lupins and this would not have happened.....but alas hubby decided that was what was going to happen.....so from here on I will do the cattle feed not him.....I was not happy with the outcome considering I had gotten them there slowly but surely... so oil went down their necks......300 ml for each calf...... and with in 15 minutes some of their bulging stomachs had gone down and back to normal....but for one....and of course the best in the pen it was a bullet......and a strip down and in to the freezer......... he was a beauty..

They have had a bale of hay(800 kg) over a period of a week and a slow introduction back on to their grain..with the feeder locked off and only able to accessed via the lid by me..(.ADVANTAGE FEEDERS ARE A GREAT IDEA. but calves can pick out the barley and leave the lupins and hay behind..).....with carb soda, bentonite, dical phosphate, salt and livamol mineral. in each 1/2 drum to allow the benefit of the soda to take care of the bubbles if any and then to put oil in their trough water.

so this week the feeder will be opened at the bottom but for 2 hours a day at the smaller opening to make them work to get their feed out....It can only be licked out and when their tongue gets tired or runs out of saliva that is if for now........ so it will only be a very tiny slot. will take photos tomorrow to give you all an idea.. for those reading this page.
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Old 01/12/17, 09:24 AM
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At this time of the year in Australia, you should be in lush pasture. Are you feeding fresh chopped Lupines? They will cause bloat. Not commonly fed in the States.
Your post sounded like you were feeding dry hay. Is that right? What happened that you aren't out on pasture?
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  #9  
Old 01/16/17, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haypoint View Post
At this time of the year in Australia, you should be in lush pasture. Are you feeding fresh chopped Lupines? They will cause bloat. Not commonly fed in the States.
Your post sounded like you were feeding dry hay. Is that right? What happened that you aren't out on pasture?
May be you should come to Australia in the height of summer...... We are very dry, no pasture here at our place...dry pasture...but nothing green. Lupins dont give bloat..... or the white ones dont, but blue lupins might...but they will cause Lupinosis if the stalks become wet and then a fungus grows on them, but that is generally when there is rain.
We mix lupins (600kg) and a third of a square bale of hay, and to that we had 50kg of lupins and increase it slowly.....but hubby got a bit excited by the idea and added more...... they were doing fine on the lower amount....but they have their feeder open on a very small opening and can only get 1 kg per day and they have their hay twice a day as usual. they also have oil on their water and it is replaced every second day. Calves now look good
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  #10  
Old 01/17/17, 02:51 PM
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Google Lupine bloat.
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