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  #1  
Old 01/22/11, 03:20 PM
 
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Location: SE tennessee
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Dexter cow,high price

Found a dexter cow on craigslist,reduced (!!?)to $2400.00..doesn't like halter work or being tied.That sounds like a ridiculous price to me.Red cow,bred to red registered bull,but still..

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  #2  
Old 01/22/11, 05:24 PM
 
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People get crazy when they pay stupid high prices for the color. I like the duns, but the beef is all the same color, and thats what I raise them for.
P.J.

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  #3  
Old 01/22/11, 05:33 PM
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I have noticed that some people price their livestock and other items high on Craigslist. It would be better to check you local newspaper or local Dexter breeder for something that is priced reasonably and fits your needs.

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  #4  
Old 01/22/11, 05:52 PM
 
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What part of the country are you in? Prices really vary according to your area.

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  #5  
Old 01/22/11, 06:11 PM
Dariy Calf Raiser
 
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I bet he would come down to $2000 real quick....price high and make people think they are getting a bargan even at the bargain price it is high

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  #6  
Old 01/22/11, 07:27 PM
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Copperhead told it right. Prices really vary and the cow you found is at the high end of the range.

To balance it off, here's the low end of the range. Scroll down to the Dexter seller.

http://www.ncagr.gov/paffairs/AgRevi...1livestock.htm

There are many things that influence the price of a milk cow. How gentle, how well trained, how well formed, if she's been bred, if she comes fresh with a calf, how much milk she gives, and tons of others.

Go visit any cow you're thinking of buying, to see how well you get along with her. You don't want to milk a cow you can't get along with.

If you find one that meets all your expectations and has been well handled and trained, she might be worth a high price. It could be better than buying a raw heifer and training her yourself.

Genebo
Paradise Farm

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  #7  
Old 01/22/11, 08:00 PM
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Are you looking for a family cow or a show cow? That is the difference in what you are willing to pay. There are a lot of good family cows out there for half the price and less. Don't be suckered into paying 2400 dollars for a family cow. The breeders may tell you it is worth it. As for me, I would wait to find a family cow that was within a reasonable price range.

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Last edited by linn; 01/22/11 at 08:02 PM.
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  #8  
Old 01/23/11, 12:20 PM
 
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I've been kinda keeping up with the price of dexters,because at some point I mean to have one for a milk cow.My neighbor's land borders me on 2 sides and he says he's planning to fence it,that won't leave me much fencing to do.I won't pay 2400 bux for a cow that won't lead..for that kind of money she shouldn't need a lead rope and should be toilet trained and whistle "Dixie".I have noticed that red and dun dexters bring a little more than black ones,but the milk ought to be the same color regardless.They're saying that they get 2400.00 for their heifer calves,I venture to say they don't sell very many.

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  #9  
Old 01/23/11, 06:44 PM
 
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Really top quality show cattle can bring crazy prices. Although, you'd think that a show potential heifer would be halter broke. That's a lot of work to halter train an adult cow; should have been done when she was small enough to drag around.

If you don't need a show animal there is no reason to pay show prices.

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  #10  
Old 01/23/11, 06:48 PM
 
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Well I'll chime in here. First of all in your original post you mentioned the red cow was bred to a red bull, you didn't mention if any were polled or not. Has the cow or the bull that bred her been tested for Chondro, PHA or A2 milk, or parentage verified? What are her bloodlines like? Halter or trained to milk? Does the breeder stand behind their animals? All the things I've mentioned will reflect the cost.
A breeder who doesn't pay attention to what they are breeding can produce an animal with a bad conformation, a bad udder plus a bad temperament. It happens will all animals not just Dexters. Jerseys have been bred for hundred of years to produce lots of milk and for the most part good udders, there are failures there also. You could say the same for Angus and their beef traits.
Dexters are supposed to be dual purpose, it's a fine line we breeders walk trying to have the best of both milk & beef.
In reality if the cow you are talking about has it all, plus is guaranteed bred, I know of folks that sell them at that price.
All that being said, there are many nice Dexters out there that will suit your needs at a lot less money, keep looking. Don't settle for anything less than what fits your needs.

Barb

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Last edited by ~Tomboy~; 01/23/11 at 06:50 PM.
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  #11  
Old 01/24/11, 11:50 AM
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I've looked hard for the dexters. The closest farm to me only raises a few every year and they're spoken for before birth. The prices of this gentleman's farm for calves up to an occassional cow start at $3,000 up to $4500.00. And I've never known him to reduce his price....

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  #12  
Old 01/24/11, 12:01 PM
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Where is that?

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  #13  
Old 01/24/11, 12:12 PM
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Well if I were you and was looking for a family cow, I would try a different breed.

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  #14  
Old 01/24/11, 12:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wish4goat View Post
I've looked hard for the dexters. The closest farm to me only raises a few every year and they're spoken for before birth. The prices of this gentleman's farm for calves up to an occassional cow start at $3,000 up to $4500.00. And I've never known him to reduce his price....
Wow for those prices I would buy up all the $300 ones around here and make a road trip!
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  #15  
Old 01/24/11, 01:46 PM
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at those prices you could buy 4 or 5 first calf certified organic heifers and go into business......

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  #16  
Old 01/24/11, 03:20 PM
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I've never seen them priced that high - they aren't cheap around here, but they are no where near those prices.

You could make a road trip anywhere and buy a few heifer calves for $800 or far less and be in a real business . . . lol! 4K? I mean, geez!

The heifers run $800-$1000 here - cows open to bred or even with a calf on the side run $1000-$1500 - never more.

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  #17  
Old 01/24/11, 04:30 PM
 
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look at red polls they are dual propose here is a link to the national assoc. grass finished breeders http://www.americanredpolls.com/Gras...ctoryindex.htm
These are a little bigger than a dexter, but they are red, they are polled, they are gentle, I've have 2 heifers for about 18 months or so and they are both bred to registered bulls. They are due in March and April. I can tell you in June how good of mothers they are. Their udders look nice now, but they havent milked up yet. We hadn't planned on milking ours so we never worked with them, but I am considering it in the future if we get a heifer calf.
Just FYI. But you will not have to spend anywhere near $2400. I bought my heifers for $600 and $700. They were 550 to 600 pounds and freshly weened. I started off with some poorly built fence so they educated me on that, but after about 4 months of them teaching me about fence building, I have had not trouble with them. They come right up to me, and they go from paddockl to paddock with no trouble. A single wire will keep them in a paddock also.

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  #18  
Old 01/25/11, 03:15 PM
 
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Red, polled Dexters are bringing top prices everywhere. It seems that horned shorties are a dime a dozen. A couple years ago I paid 250$ for one (horned shorty) delivered to my farm! So there you have it!

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  #19  
Old 01/25/11, 04:17 PM
 
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Guys this is not out of the ordinary, 2400 is the price for the cow and a guaranteed red calf. Like someone else mentioned, could be polled, could have been tested for numerous things. Take it all into account, I'm not saying that is cheap but good breeding, excellent conformation, genetic testing, and a host of other things all need to be taken into account.
What do you all say about bulls that go for thousands and thousands? Not everything is sale barn prices, some of us have many years into our cattle to get where we are now.
Just another perspective on the whole thing,

Carol

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  #20  
Old 01/25/11, 04:53 PM
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That much more just to avoid what is just about 100$ operation to remove the horns entirely? That seems awfully silly to me.

Before I had to move from Florida to Texas I was lined up to buy a very pretty dun Dexter for 1200. I got to see her parents and siblings and the lines were healthy and all that.

I would never _never_ support a farm that is trying to make raising Dexters, a traditional small farmstead/ family cow, into a sport of kings. Keep looking! Dexters are great, you just need to find some more realistic people who are selling them.

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  #21  
Old 01/25/11, 05:24 PM
 
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Well great genetics can be worth the price, but do they fit your needs. If you are looking for a family milk cow, I wouild think you have more suitable options. If you are going to build a herd or raise breeding stock, you may want super genetics. But a super cow at a high price will be tricky to liquidate if your needs and desires change. A simpler cow at market prices will move more easily. Just ask your self what your long term and short term goals are. then ask yourself what your history with similar goals are. then asses your tollerance for risk. If your asking if the price is too high, you must already believe it is. Which probably means it doesnt quite fit your goals at this time. IMHO
If you were buying from me thats probably what I would tell you. i would think most breeders of higher end genetics would rather sell to satisfied buyers who will in turn do all of their selling for them by word of mouth. Great genetics usually sell them selves to the buyers that need them. Matching the buyers is the trick.

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  #22  
Old 01/25/11, 06:02 PM
 
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They aren't going to sell it at that price.

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  #23  
Old 01/25/11, 06:12 PM
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I don't know, paying 3-4 k for a heifer or even a bred cow is just too steep unless you are showing and this is a hobby in my opinion. You cannot expect any cow, no matter the breed to sell for just loads when there are a good deal of them out there. Dexters have been used as beef and milkers for small family farms for a long time.

What good are superior genetics if they are not utilized in a manner the breed was intended for? It's not worth it to pay more for a cow (imo) than you'll be likely to make back on the first four or five boys you get out of her at market. That's my gauge at least.

With the girl I had been about to purchase she was nice enough to win prizes and I'll admit I thought her price was very fair at 1200. But for twice that amount? I expect the heifer to sit and come and perhaps roll over too :-P

The bottom has already dropped out of the horse market in most places, the specialty cow market isn't far from it methinks.

I know that for myself my goals are to breed a small herd of Dexters for milk and beef for my family. Very small scale, probably 6 working girls and a compatible consort. :-P I'd love to have time to dedicate to showing but with three kids and counting the Saanens and the chickens I am getting I doubt I'll be doing much beyond local meets.

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  #24  
Old 01/25/11, 06:19 PM
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It is all what you are needing. If you are building a registered herd or want show stock, then the price might be OK. If you want a family cow, I think it is way too steep. My little Dexter cow did not come with papers nor does she have great conformation, but she milks fours gallons per day at her peak lactation. She also has a great calf when bred to a good bull. I am wondering how many $2400 registered cows produce enough for their calf and a human family also.

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  #25  
Old 01/25/11, 07:34 PM
 
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As Tommy said, look at the cow and what she has to offer as well as what the breeder has to offer, both in reputation and guarantees. If the seller is asking top dollar for a bred animal, you should expect it to be a top animal. No doubt that a red and polled animal will give the same coloured milk as a black and horned but what is the breeding, who is she bred to and how is her conformation and temperament for being a 'house' cow? Excuse me but conformation is equally as important as temperament to her productive longevity. As CarolK said, many of us have a lot in our herds as far as time and money and this cow's price might well be within reason. Those of us that cull for conformation and/or temperament, genetically test our animals, train them to be milked, know what we are talking about in milk amounts and breed them to excellent (classified) AI bulls, expect a premium and get it. If you consider the average productive life span of a Dexter, I do know of cows that continue calving in their early 20's but probably 10 or 12 is reasonable as far as expectations, subtract her age and then divide the purchase price, I think you will find that you are buying a cow who should provide milk, 2 - 4 gallons a day and a beef in the freezer every year, for less than those of you who shop at the big 'W' But you know what? Our cows nor our time or commitment are made in China, so why does everyone expect the price to be???? Liz

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Old 01/25/11, 07:46 PM
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I surely don't mean to belittle anyone's efforts and time. However, I have yet to meet a seller who put that kind of effort into the calf they were selling.

A halter broke, show prospect with proven production lines heifer... well perhaps 2500 is a fair price (in fact I'd be glad to pay that!) but the untouched let to run wild equivalent sure isn't. I would expect in that price range to see genetic testing in the sire and dam and some show credentials.

the ad in the OP says distinctly that the cow doesn't like the halter and I see no evidence of any testing being mentioned.

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Old 01/25/11, 08:15 PM
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Don't assume that high prices equals superior genetics. Often the genetics haven't even been researched. It's just a case of charging all that the market will bear.

Years ago, when I first started to breed Dexters, the nice lady who sold me some of her best Dexters asked me to promise her that I'd never charge exhorbitant prices for the Dexters I raised from her stock. I promised. So have many others. It's far more important to put Dexters into the hands of small farmers than it is to try to make a living off of them.

You'll find a complete range of owners, ranging from those who carefully select their breeding stock to those who bought generic Dexters and sell everything that hits the ground.

The odd thing is that the price often has nothing to do with which type you're dealing with. Those who think that high prices means high quality are the natural prey of some.

That's why I always urge buyers to visit the Dexters they are considering buying. Check out the pedigrees online. See the DNA test results first. Find a good mentor to guide you in your selection.

Don't be impatient. It's not easy to find the right cow for you. If you buy the first one you see, you'll end up being one of those who raise the generic Dexters, instead of high quality Dexters. That wouldn't be good for you or for the breed.

The same goes for any breed. Dexters are like every breed, they aren't all jewels. If someone has a low quality Dexter in his herd, guess what he does with it? He sells it! A lot of the cattle on the market are someone else's culls. You have to be picky and don't get taken.

Owning good Dexters is a pleasure beyond compare. I mean healthy Dexters that fulfill your expectations without causing you worries and expense. You don't want to have to fight your cow in order to milk her. You don't want to have to send your bull to the processor at a young age because his feet and legs won't hold him up any more. You don't want to lose your cow in a difficult birth because she tends to have huge calves.

Look for quality first, worry about the price later.

Like CraterCove said, a well trained, nicely conformed cow that meets all your expectations is worth whatever you're willing to pay. My own words would be that an untrained, poorly configured cow that has some issues for you to deal with is no prize. It's mighty tasty, though.

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  #28  
Old 01/25/11, 08:41 PM
 
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The $2400 cow in question must have been tested as was the bull,they say both are PHA/chrondo free..she's dehorned.Looks well formed from the side view,maybe a little overweight.Quite a variation between the front and back of the udder and her hind feet look like she's walking heavily on her heels but in all fairness her hind feet don't show that well.Maybe some judicious hoof trimming would be in order.For me,even with perfect conformation,the lack of being led would be a deal killer,even at a cheaper price.

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  #29  
Old 01/26/11, 08:10 AM
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Just a warning... I have seen people on forums and CL claim their lines to be Chrondo free because their lines don't have 'so and so' in their background and so they don't need to test. Paperwork is a must with all transactions... but doubly so with CL dealings. For some reason people seem more willing to try and scam you if you contact them through Cl. Just my experience though.

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  #30  
Old 01/26/11, 09:49 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CraterCove View Post
I surely don't mean to belittle anyone's efforts and time. However, I have yet to meet a seller who put that kind of effort into the calf they were selling.
Come to Canada and visit me Actually there are quite a few of us who would be more than happy to oblige! As a matter of fact, I know there are a couple of posters on this thread who care about bloodlines, selling sound animals, free of genetic mutations, conformation, temperament and ensuring that the buyer and the cow are a good match. So you could actually meet sellers who 'put that kind of effort' into Dexters they are selling, closer to home.

Most of us that do spend the time and money, handling, testing and culling those that are not appropriate can't afford to give away the ones that are appropriate for breeding, we have to pay for the rest of the crew. And besides I am not the Dalai Lama!
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