Wild Cherry and Highland cattle ,POISON? - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 05/27/10, 11:56 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Wild Cherry and Highland cattle ,POISON?

Ok, just made a new pasture with an acre or so of woods.
Now someone tells me that the cherry tree that got uprooted by the dozer will kill my cows! So I just searched and see where they say only in the freshly wilted stage,fresh and dead are ok.
Now a old farmer told me that Highland cattle are ok eating cherry trees. Was he just taking about the fresh and dead leafes? It was like Highlands are ok,other cattle not so much.
I fenced this in for shade and I'm sure there will be all kinds of fallen branches and stuff all thru the year.
I have 3 Highlands and a couple highland x angus.
Man ,always something to worry about!
Chris

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  #2  
Old 05/27/10, 12:25 PM
 
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Wilted cherry tree leaves will kill cattle. Hydrogen cyanide (with the historical common name of Prussic acid) is the source of the poison. I doubt that any cattle can survive the consumption of more than a few stressed or wilted leaves. I have black cherry trees in my shade areas and I am not concerned with the cattle eating a few non wilted low growing leaves. If a tree toppled, I would move the cattle or the tree.

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  #3  
Old 05/27/10, 11:28 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Thanks Agman,just wanted to make sure this wasn't another old wives tale!
That bumms me out big time. Fenced in the woods so they'd have some nice shade and now I gotta worry about killing them!
The woods are so thick in the middle ,you can't really walk in it. I figured the cows would clear it a bit. So I really have to check the whole woods which is gonna be a pain. Plus last time I got a huge case of poison ivy!
So if there are tress or branches that fell a long time ago, do I have to worry about them too?
And will they eat them if there is lush grass to eat?
Man,I had enough problems with this fence already,the posts are up, I gotta put up the wires yet. If I would have known that I think i would have just fenced in a small part that's easier to monitor.
I'm just getting sick over this
Chris

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  #4  
Old 05/28/10, 06:39 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: NW WI
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I can't speak to the poison question, but our highlanders eat a lot of leaves even when they could be eating good grass. They'll push small trees over to get at the leaves they want.

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  #5  
Old 05/28/10, 07:35 AM
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Chris, with the amount of cattle you have I'd not be worried at all. Once again dried cherry leaves are fine to eat, green cherry leaves are fine to eat. The wilting leaves are not good to eat. If an entire tree fell over I'd be concerned, a few branches to me is not a big deal. Only starving cattle would stand at the downed tree and continue to eat leaves all day long. My wooded pastures are full of cherry trees, never been an issue. My cattle love to eat leaves, they eat some here and there and keep moving on. I surely would not create new worklist based on cherry trees, and besides it's a bit hot out these days....JMO...Topside

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Last edited by topside1; 05/28/10 at 07:42 AM.
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  #6  
Old 05/28/10, 11:04 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Yes ,I know mine like to eat the leaves of the one shade tree they have,a wild cherry! They trim it where they can reach it.
I will get rid of the big dozed one ,or fence it out for now (DH is working 6 or 7 days these days and does not feel like working at home too) but I'm worried about all the fallen branches inside the woods.
And yes it is too hot here in NE OH too and I have 16000 feet of HT wire to put up!
Thanks,Chris

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  #7  
Old 05/28/10, 12:50 PM
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Lasergrl
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Geauga County, Ohio
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I have a highand, a mini angus, and a zebu, up here in NE Ohio as well. There are at least 50 cherry trees in the pasture. They have been eating them with no ill effect for over a year.

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  #8  
Old 05/28/10, 03:27 PM
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Location: VA
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Agmantoo told it like it is. The poison in the cherry leaves is fairly dilute until the leaves wilt. Then it is concentrated. It doesn't take much to kill a cow. It has done it and will do it again.

Keeping black cherry trees in a cow pasture is dangerous. Keeping cows in a black cherry orchard is very risky.

All of the malus fruit trees (apple, pear, cherry, peach, almond, apricot, etc.) carry cyanide in their tissues and are a risk to cattle of all breeds.

A downed tree is mentioned in many of the horror stories. The leaves dry out and concentrate the poison. The sudden availability of a new taste treat entices the cattle to eat a lot. Disaster ensues.

Genebo
Paradise Farm

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  #9  
Old 05/28/10, 07:15 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Ok,seems to be a little conflicting here.
Everybody agrees on the wilt poison, but some do ,some don't worry about having wild cherry trees in the pasture too much.
Lasergrl,is your pasture pretty thick with trees?
I'm worried cause it is so thick, I can't see or check if there are any downed trees or branches.

Will this poison be inactive after a while? I mean like after a downed tree lays there a few weeks or over winter or something?
Thanks,Chris

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  #10  
Old 05/28/10, 07:46 PM
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Location: Geauga County, Ohio
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I do worry about them but isnt much I can do right now. They are sparse, a tree every 30 feet or so, and they are immature. In this picture from last spring you can sort of see in the right upper corner what I mean. The heavy tree line is outside of the pasture

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  #11  
Old 05/28/10, 07:53 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Hey Lasergrl CUTE PIC!!!
How old is your Highland?
Yeah,I wish mine were sparse like that,I'm not sure what to do except fence them out for now

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  #12  
Old 05/28/10, 08:07 PM
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Chris, come cooler weather target the cherry trees for firewood, the leaves will have fallen and cherry is a fine firewood. It's only my opinion but the leaves will not kill cattle or goats unless they eat large amounts of the leaves. Plus the large amounts need to be eaten during the wilting stage....Come on how long does that last? Seriously, my goats and steers eat mountain laural, very poisonous plant, they only eat little bits at a time and move on....Enjoy your weekend and rest.....Topside

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  #13  
Old 05/28/10, 08:22 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Hey topside, thanks. So you mean the wilting stage eventually turns into the dead stage so after they dry out it's ok?
I mean I know that's how it is with other trees but I mean poison wise.
We did target that big one for firewood that's why it wasn't pushed over the highwall

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  #14  
Old 06/01/10, 10:43 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Lisbon,Ohio
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Just a bump ,hopefully someone will answer my Q.about the poison drying up with the leaves.

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  #15  
Old 06/02/10, 06:49 AM
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Dried cherry leaves fall out of the trees each Fall. Cherry leaves are on the list below...Topside

Poisonous:

African Rue
Andromeda (related to foxglove)
Avocado- South American Avocado leaves/tree such as Haas or crosses with Haas
Avocado- Fuarte (definitely)
Azalea
Brouwer's Beauty Andromeda
Boxwood
Calotropis
Cassava (manioc)
China Berry Trees, all parts
Choke Cherries, wilting especially
Choke Cherry Leaves in abundance
Datura
Dog Hobble
Dumb Cane (diffenbachia) (Houseplant)
False Tansy
"Fiddleneck"- know by this common name in CA. It is a fuzzy looking, 12" to 15" plant, with small yellow blossoms, shaped on a stem shaped like the neck of a fiddle.
Flixweed
Fusha
Holly Trees/Bushes
Ilysanthes floribunda
Japanese pieris (extremely toxic)
Japanese Yew
Lantana - appears on both lists
Larkspur- a ferny, flowering plant in shades of blue, pink and white.
Lasiandra
Lilacs
Lily of the Valley (Pieris Japonica)
Lupine - appears on both lists: Seeds are the part of the plant that are the greatest problem.
Madreselva (Spain) patologia renal
Maya-Maya
Monkhood
Milkweed
Mountain Laurel
Nightshade- appears on both lists: Whether this is really poisonous is questionable because I have received a post saying "my goats eat nightshade all the time". We also have a lot of Nightshade on own property and none of our goats have died from it. I tend to think it is ok in moderation.
Oleander
Pieris Japonica (extreamly toxic)
Rhododendron
Rhubarb leaves
Tu Tu (the Maori name for Coriaria arborea)
Wild Cherry, -wilted- leaves (fresh and fully dried are not poisonous)
Yew

Edible:
Acorns (in moderation)
Agapanthas
Althea
Angel Wing Bigoneas
Apple
Arborvita
Avocado*- Mexican Avocado leaves/trees such Pinkerton might not be (*note-South American Avocado leaves ARE poisonous)
Bamboo
Banana, entire plant, fruit & peel
Barkcloth fig (ficus natalensis)
Bay Tree Leaves green and dried
Bean (all parts)
Beets, leaves and root
Blackberry bushes (all parts)
Black Locus (we had quite a few of these until our goats ate them all)
Bramble
Broccoli (all parts)
Buckbrush (aka coralberry or indian currant)
Cabbage
Camellias
Cantaloupe: fruit, seeds and peel
Collard Greens
Carrots
Catnip
Cedar Needles (leaves) & Bark
Celery
Citrus
Clover
Corn husks & silk
Cottonwood
Coyote Bush (Baccharis)
Dandelion
Douglas Fir
Dogwood
Elm
English Ivy (we feed lvy trimming all the time; they love it)
Fava Bean pods
Fern
Fescue grass
Ficus
Garlic
Ginger Root
Grape, entire plants
Grape Vine
Grapefruit, fruit & peel
Greenbrier
Hay Plant
Heavenly Bamboo
Hemlock Trees (which are not the same as the poisonous hemlock, an herbaceous species of plant which is in the carrot family that bears the scientific name “Conium maculatum")
Hibiscus
Honeysuckle, entire plant (goats love honeysuckle)
Hyssop
Ivy
Jackfruit leaves
Jade
Jambolan leaves
Japanese Elm
Japanese Knotweed aka: polygonum cuspidatum aka: fallopia japonica.
Japanese Magnolias (blooms/leaves)
Johoba
Kudzu
Lantana - appears on both lists
Lilac bark /branches
Lupine - appears on both lists: Seeds are the part of the plant that are the greatest problem.
Magnolia Leaves green and dried
Mango leaves
Manzanita (Arctostaphylos)
Maple Trees, leaves & bark - (goats will readily strip the bark and kill the tree)
Marijuana-in moderation
Mesquite
Mint
Mock Orange
Monkeyflower (Mimulus)
Mountain Ash (excellent goat forage tree)
Morning Glory
Moss
Mulberry (entire plant)
Mullein
Mustard
Nettles
Nightshade - appears on both lists:- I have received a post saying "my goats eat nightshade all the time". We also have a lot of Nightshade on own property and none of our goats have died from it.
Lemon Grass
Oak Tree Leaves
Okara- pulp left over after making Soymilk
Onion
Orange, fruit & peel
Paloverde - needles & seed pods
Patterson's Curse
Pea Pods
Peanuts, including the shells
Pear
Pencil cactus
Peppers
Pepper plants
Photinia
Pine Trees (we had hundreds of small trees until our goats ate them all)
Plum, all
PrivetPumpkin
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Poison Sumac, the vine
Pomegranates
Poplar Trees
Potatoes
Raisins
Raspberry, entire plant (goats loves raspberry)
Red-tips
Rose, all, entire plant (goats loves roses)
Rhubarb Leaves
Salvation Jane
Sassafras
Southern Bayberry (myrica cerifera)
Spruce trees
Sumac, the tree
Sunflowers
St. John's Wort (can cause sun sensitivity in light skinned goats)
Strawberry
Sweet Gum Trees
Sweet potato leaves
Tomatoes (cherry tomatoes make wonderful treats)
Tomato plants- in moderation (mine eat them with no problems)
Tree of Heaven
Turnips
Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria)
Yarrow
Yellow Locus
Yucca
Vetch
Virginia Creeper
Wandering Jew
Watermelon
Wax Myrtle (myrica cerifera)
Weeping Willow
Wild Rose, entire plant (goats loves roses)
Wild Tobacco

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Last edited by topside1; 06/02/10 at 06:52 AM.
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  #16  
Old 06/02/10, 06:56 AM
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http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/c...son/poison.htm
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Old 06/02/10, 06:57 AM
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http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/c...on/Prunuse.htm
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