Hereford vs Angus - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 08/12/09, 01:29 PM
 
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Cool Hereford vs Angus

Can one of you more experienced Beef producers tell me what some of the characteristic differences are between a Hereford and Angus? ie, height, width, carcass hanging weight, and anything else that I should be aware of? Couldn't find much good info when I googled it. (I currently have 3 Herefords, and 2 angus, seems the herefords are taller, but the Angus are wider, is this to be expected?) How will the size of steaks differ?

Thanks.

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Old 08/12/09, 02:04 PM
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Well, I'm an Angus breeder, so I may not be considered the most objective source.

BUT I think you'll find that Angus will give you higher quality (marbled) beef than Herefords. The Angus cattle will be polled (no horns), but Herefords may go either way. If you plan to market any live animals, in my area Angus outsell Herefords.

Herefords have a reputation (right or wrong) for bad udders and eye problems. Pigment around the eye can help there, though.

Having said the above, I think you'll find a lot of variety within either breed for the qualities that you mention. Learn about EPDs. They'll help you select for ribeye (muscling), marbling, height, etc.

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Old 08/12/09, 02:12 PM
 
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Angus are what I produce because that is what the market will pay a premium due to the marketing skills of the Certified Angus Beef Association.
Here is my take on the Angus
Less calving problems
More adaptable to rotational grazing
Perform satisfactorily to grass only feed
Less sun blistering to udders
Fewer incidents of cancer eye
Fewer incidents of pinkeye
Less dockage at sale barn
Demand is higher from individual buyers
Less foot problems

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Old 08/12/09, 05:10 PM
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Having dealt with both, all of the above is true.

However, Herefords tend to be much better mothers, and easier for the stockman to handle, as well.
So, it depends on what you want to deal with.

Most of the ranches I've lived on, as well as neighbored, have run Angus or Angus-cross because hardiness is more important than handling.
not to mention, anyone in the cattle business knows, 'Black sells.'

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Old 08/12/09, 06:28 PM
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I've not had a whole lot of dealing with Herefords. However, I've always heard hereford= udder probs and pink eye.

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  #6  
Old 08/12/09, 06:31 PM
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the herefords we had when I was a teen were easy to work with and had no real issues ..

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Old 08/12/09, 07:18 PM
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I get tired of hearing all the rampage about pink eye and udder problems.

It all comes down to SELECTION on genetics. If a cow has eye problems or a bad udder, ship her. Simple as that. Bad udders is due to genetics; if a producer can emphasize on good genetics and have a good culling regime, then he/she won't have these problems. Same with temperment and other things.

As to the comparisons between these two breeds, I am more partial to Herefords than Angus.

Reason being is that Herefords are more easy going and are more docile than Angus. Plus they ain't black.

Herefords are hardy animals, able to adapt quickly to different climate. I know a breeder in South Africa that has excellent quality Herefords that are bred and raised to forage for themselves and are not pampered at all. Neither does he have problems with udders or eyes because he selects for good udders and eyes. And he's in a location where they don't get much grass, just the similar stuff you'd find out in the chaparral in Arizona. Angus are more prone to be spending their time in the shade on really hot spells. You don't find as many Angus down in the South as you do up north.

Angus and Hereford are both able to be easy keeping, but you'll also find stock that are hard keepers as well. Again, it's all down to culling decisions. Herefords are one of the best for forage convertability, which is why they do well in adverse climate.

Due to their calm nature, they are also adapt at rotational grazing, and do not need grain to maintain condition.

Angus do have an advantage, and primarily this is due to CAB and their marketing schemes to make everyone believe that "Black is Better." Angus are better in marbling than Hereford, however both are early maturing, both have average calving ease, both have good mothering ability, both have good foraging ability. Both are good for developing sires for terminal and maternal breeding, primarily maternal. Both are prone to prolapse, both are prone to calving problems. Depends on selection and what you get.

Both breeds are great for producing black-baldy calves that do better than either breeds.

Both Hereford and Angus produce cattle that are of similar size and hanging weight.

However, there is more variation within the breeds than between the breeds. Keep that in mind.

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Old 08/12/09, 09:21 PM
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Depends on your local market more than anything. Here, anything that looks like a Hereford will bring about 60% of what most other breeds will for a similar size calf. Angus doesn't do much better here, Charolais or Blonde crosses will almost always top the market.

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Old 08/12/09, 09:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaleK View Post
Depends on your local market more than anything. Here, anything that looks like a Hereford will bring about 60% of what most other breeds will for a similar size calf. Angus doesn't do much better here, Charolais or Blonde crosses will almost always top the market.
And here in Kansas, Black is lovely. It really MUST depend on your local market!

Edited to add: OOps, sorry, you were looking for experience and I have none, the above is just what I have heard!!!!!!!!!
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  #10  
Old 08/12/09, 10:25 PM
 
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Black cattle dominate the beef market here in NC also.

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Old 08/12/09, 10:59 PM
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Black and Black Baldy seem to be a popular fav here as well.

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  #12  
Old 08/12/09, 11:54 PM
 
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National beef buys all types of cattle, Even cattle from Mexico. The demands of the market dictate what sells. The Angus breeders have just put A spin on there cattle. For marketing..For my money its Herfords or there crosses for A better beef animal.. Theres more difference in A breed than between breeds.

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Old 08/13/09, 05:52 AM
 
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I agree with Karin L. Genetics is the key more so than the breed. It is true that in a large section of the country, mine included, black calves bring a premium. Aside from that you can select for the traits you desire, and cull the traits that are undesirable. That is the only way to ever improve your herd.

Having said that, one thing in your OP stands out to me. You said your herefords were taller and thinner, but the angus were shorter and thicker. That tells me your herefords have a higher frame score. A cow with lower frame (to a point, of course) will be much more efficient than a cow with a larger frame.

Other things being equal (and you'll have to determine that) I would sell the larger herefords and get more smaller framed cows. And, yes, if you like herefords you can find smaller framed herefords without the undesirable traits.

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  #14  
Old 08/13/09, 08:23 AM
 
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You probably won't see any more difference in the steak sizes between the breeds then between animals. The Angus will marble better but the Hereford has been doing well on the shear test for tenderness.

Dad has always raised Herefords so I'm a bit prejudiced. That said I have seen few Herefords that will stand up to the ones dad raises.

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Old 08/13/09, 08:41 AM
 
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Forgive my ignorance, but I thought that you get marbling by feeding corn the last few months prior to butcher.

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Old 08/13/09, 12:43 PM
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Curtis, from what I've been taught and read about, this is partially true. But the other part of this is genetics. Angus have the genes for adequate marbling, as well as some other breeds.

As for markets, up here the reds and yellows and red white faces and yellow white faces seem to sell better than the blacks. I honestly don't see very many black calves around Barrhead-Westlock-Athabasca regions, nor up in the Peace region. The last few years we had stockers, we'd only get a handful of Angus steers out of 80 or 90 head of stockers that comprised mostly of Red Angus, Gelbvieh, Charolais, Simmental, Limousin, Shorthorn and Hereford and a whole wack load of in-between crosses. There might be a pocket somewhere in Alberta where blacks are selling high, but that's just a little one out of the whole province. I guess it's because we're not fooled so much by the black hide as some areas of the states; what WILL sell are calves that look good, healthy and soggy-looking, no matter what colour of the hide they have.

Because remember, when you take off the hide, they all look the same in the end.

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Old 08/13/09, 06:54 PM
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A good friend of mine (also a ranch girl, but now living in Indianapolis) and I were laughing about that one day.
She had a neighbor (city) who would only buy certified Angus. "It tastes better!"


'Becca and I were laughing at this since very few palates would ever be able to the tell the difference between a Hereford TBone or an Angus TBone.
But the Angus folks have done a much better job of marketing.

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  #18  
Old 08/14/09, 10:40 PM
 
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Ditto - Karin L. I've never had an issue with udders or eyes with my Herefords. Their are very calm, like trees standing in the pasture. My Angus are a bit more high strung and are the first to the gate every morning for new pasture.
Height, width, and dress out are pretty similar between them. Like yours, my Herefords are a little taller and the Angus wider, but that may not be the case with all herds since there is so much variability.

Curtis B - yes, but that's not the only way - there are many more factors involved. For example, if you're gaining over a lb and a half /day, with a mature animal, you'll get marbling with grass fed as well.

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Old 08/14/09, 10:56 PM
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Grandpa raised black Angus. They produced the best meat I have ever eaten. But his were grass fed and he bred for grass to meat conversion, ease in handling, and good mothering abilities. The typical Angus body style has changed quite a bit in the past 30 years, and so has the grass to meat conversion factor. But that has changed quite a bit for just about every breed of cow since grass-fed beef has become popular again. We did have a few Hereford/Angus crosses. Neighbor's bull got out, cows were in heat. The resulting offspring didn't taste any different from what we had before.

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Old 08/15/09, 09:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis B View Post
Forgive my ignorance, but I thought that you get marbling by feeding corn the last few months prior to butcher.
That used to be the thinking. But the last several years there's been a lot of university research done on how an animal actually marbles. And we find they start marbling at a young age....as long as there's high quality nutrition available to them.

The first thing is genetics. If an animal doesn't have the genetic ability marble, you can feed him forever and just get more backfat. Then comes management: feed and health. Even a calf with marbling genetics won't marble if he's not getting enough high quality nutrition to grow AND lay down marbling. If he gets sick while in the feedlot, you can just about forget a high quality carcass.

This article is on the Angus website:

http://www.angus.org/pub/newsroom/re...eef_Flavor.htm
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