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  #31  
Old 01/10/13, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by crispin View Post
I have used a big fire to take care of that problem.
This is our method.

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  #32  
Old 01/10/13, 04:28 PM
 
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We had a wildlife biologist leave a deer carcass out (with cameras and all) for research on scavengers. It was stripped to bones by the third day. What one magpie knows they all know, apparently. We didn't smell anything--course we did this in cold weather, but it wasn't more than a football field away from the house.

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  #33  
Old 01/10/13, 04:29 PM
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Nice tractor, 2000 or 3000!

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I love the way it looks, and for being so old it runs like a champ. I found it on craigslist. Reminds me of something that would be animated on CARS.
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  #34  
Old 01/10/13, 04:45 PM
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I was also going to suggest lime or wood ash to help the animal decompose faster and keep the smell down. How feral is your place? Do you have scavengers that will take care of the carcass? If so, it should be down to scattered bones in about 1-2 weeks. Not much time for it to stink.

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  #35  
Old 01/10/13, 04:46 PM
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We compost them to recover the nutrients.

Lay down a 18" thick layer of carbon (hay, straw, woodchips, sawdust, brush...).
Put the carcass on the layer of carbon.
Puncture the rumen so it doesn't explode - messy.
Put 18" of carbon on top of that.
Protect it from scavengers.
You can flip it in a few months or just leave it for a year.
Plant pumpkins and other heavy feeders on the pile.
Spread the rich soil amendment on the orchards and gardens.

We have composted pigs as large as 1,700 lbs this way. All that is left is a grey stain. The bones dissolve too.

See:

http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2010/06/25/bigun-tusks/
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2011/09/02/s...pkins-compost/
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2009/05/04/death-on-the-farm/

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  #36  
Old 01/10/13, 08:33 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Tn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbee View Post
We had a wildlife biologist leave a deer carcass out (with cameras and all) for research on scavengers. It was stripped to bones by the third day. What one magpie knows they all know, apparently. We didn't smell anything--course we did this in cold weather, but it wasn't more than a football field away from the house.
Same here - I've seen dead cows gone within 48 hours. Gone, bones and all. Leaving dead animals out for scavengers makes the most sense to me. But we have plenty of property and plenty of woods to drag stuff off away from the house.

Not a worry about drawing predators as far as I'm concerned. Scavengers and predators are on the watch and hunt all the time. You leaving something for them to eat isn't going to draw them to your live animals any more than they already are drawn to them. Trust me they know you have livestock already.
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  #37  
Old 01/10/13, 09:27 PM
 
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We have vultures here. It is annoying to see them circling around all the time, but it is amazing how quickly they can take care of a carcass! Hours not days!

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  #38  
Old 01/10/13, 09:51 PM
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When I was a teenager my horse broke his neck on state land and my Dad called some guy a few counties over who had large cats. (Lions and tigers) to come get him for food. The guy tried to charge us but we refused to pay. Either he wanted 1000 pounds of free animal food or not. He did. This was in Florida.

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  #39  
Old 01/10/13, 09:53 PM
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I compost road kills every week. if you follow highlands advice in msg 35, you'll be fine. no smell, 6 - 12 months later you have rich soil/fertilizer. The only part i don't like about the process is cutting open the gut. I picked up an armdillo this week that had been crushed enough i didn't have to mess with him. but the otter, way cute otter, was still whole, only a little blood coming from his mouth. So he had to get gut cut.

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  #40  
Old 01/10/13, 11:49 PM
 
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I know that some people throw dead chickens into the trash, and the larges animals we have had die was a small donkey. Everyone I know burns them. I have a pit that I use. Once everything but the bones are burnt, I have been told it is sanitary. At the risk of sounding very ignorant, this is the first I am hearing of people burying large animals. Everyone I've ever heard on the topic says the same thing, that if you leave it coyotes will come and attack the rest of your animals. The only other disposal that I have heard in these parts is if they are very small, some throw them into the garbage, yet, it is talked of as if that is something that is not ethical, and people shouldn't, though I don't know if it's legal.

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  #41  
Old 01/11/13, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by rambler View Post
Some locations have a cow about harming the groundwater if you burry them.\
So they have a cow about your dead cow, right?
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  #42  
Old 01/11/13, 09:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Huntress View Post
Everyone I've ever heard on the topic says the same thing, that if you leave it coyotes will come and attack the rest of your animals.
People who don't know better worry this will happen. It makes sense to them in their minds. But it doesn't actually happen. Scavenging dead stuff is part of what they do. It isn't going to make them attack your live animals. They may at some point attack your live animals if they get a chance because this is just what they do, but it won't be because they found something dead to scavenge on your place.
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  #43  
Old 01/11/13, 10:35 AM
 
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Location: Indiana
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A neighbor I met when I first moved out to this rural area hauled his deadstock (occasional cow or horse) across the road and dumped them at the base of a power tower. Once the land near the tower was sold, he had to be a little more discreet and buried them on his own land.

I had to laugh though, for 2-3 years after that practice stopped, all the turkey vultures within miles would line up on the crossbars of that tower at the end of the day, waiting for dinner. There must have been 40 or 50 of them. Eventually, their numbers decreased and now there are none.

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  #44  
Old 01/11/13, 11:11 AM
 
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Got Pigs? The other omnivore?

Mine crave non-vegetable protein as much as the dogs!

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  #45  
Old 01/11/13, 12:03 PM
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When I was a kid, I went with a friend's family to a pig farm down in Oklahoma. As we walked around the place, the farmer was picking up dead piglets as he found them, throwing their tiny bodies onto a fire. I was horrified, and I have never forgotten it.

I think because I was not raised on a farm, getting used to feeding dead baby animals to pigs or dogs might not be a level I ever achieve.

I am liking the composting method more and more.

I'm sure my thoughts will seem silly to some long-time farmers.

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  #46  
Old 01/11/13, 12:11 PM
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Location: Iowa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coso View Post
Coyotes and Buzzards! If you have enough land drag them away far enough that you don't smell the carcass. Nature will take care of it. The coyotes know where the food is one way or the other.
First nominee for Worse advise of 2013 award ... ^^^

Quote:
Originally Posted by highlands View Post
We compost them to recover the nutrients.

Lay down a 18" thick layer of carbon (hay, straw, woodchips, sawdust, brush...).
Put the carcass on the layer of carbon.
Puncture the rumen so it doesn't explode - messy.
Put 18" of carbon on top of that.
Protect it from scavengers.
You can flip it in a few months or just leave it for a year.
Plant pumpkins and other heavy feeders on the pile.
Spread the rich soil amendment on the orchards and gardens.

We have composted pigs as large as 1,700 lbs this way. All that is left is a grey stain. The bones dissolve too.

See:

http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2010/06/25/bigun-tusks/
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2011/09/02/s...pkins-compost/
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2009/05/04/death-on-the-farm/
This is how its done ....... ^^^
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  #47  
Old 01/11/13, 12:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidepasser View Post
In my county in GA. it is illegal to leave a carcass out on the ground and it is also illegal to bury it too close to a "live" water supply such as a lake, stream, creek, river, etc.
So, does the county sue itself or the state when they find a dead deer or coyote laying out on the ground?!?

I know laws are meant to protect. It just seems funny though that it's illegal to let an animal lay, but yet TruGreen can come to your neighbor's house, spray chemicals and poisons on their lawn that leach into the water supply, and that's fine. But if your goat dies, you can't haul her out to the woods to let nature take it's couse.

Goats that have died get hauled back to the compost pile. Forerunner has a "Extreme composting" thread - so if you have enough material, nature will take care of it for you.

I did have a horse that died, and I called the neighbor with a backhoe. He was more than happy to come drag it to the field and bury it. Didn't charge me anything. (It's good to have good neighbors!)

It's a good thing to think about though! Find your options now and think it over rather than waiting until your horse dies in the middle of summer during a 100 degree heat wave!!!!!
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  #48  
Old 01/11/13, 03:45 PM
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How much land do you have? If you have enough make a designated area where you can dump them, We drag them up ontot eh hill far away from everything and nature deals with them, We have also burned them and do burie some stuff such as horses that were more like pets.

The spot we take them know one can see or smell unless you go there and there isn't much reason to go there, teh animals eat them and there usually gone before they smell.

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  #49  
Old 01/11/13, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe.G View Post
How much land do you have?
Not near enough, as far as I'm concerned. Only 20 acres.

But then again, if I had a thousand acres I'd still probably want to buy the land next door.
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  #50  
Old 01/11/13, 04:09 PM
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The only part i don't like about the {about composting} process is cutting open the gut.
Good news! The puncture the stomach is for big rumen animals. I don't bother with pigs or sheep.
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  #51  
Old 01/11/13, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by highlands View Post
Good news! The puncture the stomach is for big rumen animals. I don't bother with pigs or sheep.
I think it was Cornell U that published a bunch of stuff on composting animals and that's where I got the advice to puncture the gut. I thought it just accelerated the composting process. But I must admit, I don't always bother because unlike with so many other things, with compost I am patient. The piles can sit there as long as they like and it makes no mind to me.
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  #52  
Old 01/12/13, 05:19 AM
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I have never had a back hoe or front end loader but I did raise some cattle. I either cremated carcasses in the pasture or hired a backhoe from neighboring farmers to bury them.

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  #53  
Old 01/12/13, 07:07 AM
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We have a place out back called "llama land." Lost all but one llama in the horrible heat wave 2 years ago. They all were gone from the back forty in less than 3 days, between the feral hogs, coyotes, and buzzards. Not even a bone to be found.

Keep tripping over old cow bones all the time from the previous owner. They're very well aged.

My donkeys and horses are another story. When they pass, a friend will bring out his backhoe to bury them here. If I have any say about it, I'll go in next to them. I refuse to be put some place where the ---- lawn mowers run over the flat markers to scalp the grass.

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  #54  
Old 01/12/13, 10:09 AM
 
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Here in eastern NE, I have used a company called Darling something or other. For a $30.00 fee (might be higher now) they will pick up dead animals. I was told that they turn it into pet food.

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  #55  
Old 01/12/13, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by CesumPec View Post
I think it was Cornell U that published a bunch of stuff on composting animals and that's where I got the advice to puncture the gut. I thought it just accelerated the composting process. But I must admit, I don't always bother because unlike with so many other things, with compost I am patient. The piles can sit there as long as they like and it makes no mind to me.
They do have that in their literature. Specifically in what I read they were talking about the rumen of cows because the rumen is so large it can become gas filled to the point of exploding. They advise puncturing them to avoid the mess. Exploding Cows would be a dramatic headline...

With our pigs we have had some as large as 1,700 lbs that I have composted and I have not punctured them but they've composted fine. I think this may because the pig stomach is so much smaller.

It certainly wouldn't help. In fact, to maximize composting action, one could grind the bones to make my bread, er, I mean compost...
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  #56  
Old 01/12/13, 03:12 PM
 
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If you have a post hole drill....you can drill several holes close together and then shovel out the loosened soil. Just keep a place dug out and put a pole in it to notify folks that there is a hole.

A no. 2 true temper shovel and a grub hoe is slow work digging to bury a horse or cow....not to bad for a sheep or goat.

Deer hunting clubs around here often dig a pit and throw in hides and such, and keep covering with hydrated lime till deer season is over.

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  #57  
Old 01/12/13, 04:10 PM
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Here in eastern NE, I have used a company called Darling something or other. For a $30.00 fee (might be higher now) they will pick up dead animals. I was told that they turn it into pet food.
This is called a rendering service. Interestingly, when I just checked the YellowPages.com I came up with computer graphic rendering companies but no carcass or hide renderers. They do exist although many have gone out of business in recent decades with the decline of small slaughterhouses. There used to be a bunch in our state and I think we're done to one but I couldn't find it when I just checked on the web so either they're invisible or gone.
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  #58  
Old 01/12/13, 06:37 PM
 
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Thank goodness I have a kind neighbor with a tractor that will dig a hole.....because one of my biggest goats died the week my husband was also dying so I had a major problem on my hands....he sent one of the young men who occassionally works for him up to my farm (just up the hill from him) and he took Maddie and buried her for me. He's also buried pygmy goats in the past....I don't know what I'd do without his help!

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  #59  
Old 01/12/13, 06:37 PM
 
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Oh---and before that we used our tiller to loosen the soil and dug it out by hand to bury one of the larger goats in the past...

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  #60  
Old 01/12/13, 07:04 PM
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We compost, or for the little things (lambs, chickens, rabbits, etc) double bag and into the trash pickup.

We also large animal pick up service that is free (or small charge) since we can't bury here. I have used that for two horses

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