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  #21  
Old 01/10/13, 03:56 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: KS
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Thank you all so much for your suggestions. Every scenario that comes to mind I try to find a solution that involves no outside help, to be as self sufficient as possible if I can help it.

Outside possibilites like rendering trucks and asking neighbors are great options too, but if I can swing the answer to a problem without having to ask for outside help, that's what I want to do.

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  #22  
Old 01/10/13, 03:59 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MN
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Nice tractor, 2000 or 3000!

--->Paul

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  #23  
Old 01/10/13, 03:59 PM
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Location: East-Central Ontario
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Cows compost fine within about 6 mo, you need about 18" of straw, hay, shavings above and below them and tun the pile if you can. If you do a half decent job everything will be gone but the most dense parts of the skull and pelvis

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  #24  
Old 01/10/13, 04:02 PM
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 95

Has anyone seen the video of what they did with that dead beached whale?


Solution: dynamite (an umbrella is needed also)

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  #25  
Old 01/10/13, 04:10 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earthkitty View Post
So far, the only dead things we have had to dispose of have been birds. Spring is coming, and with it probably several births among our sheep. As we breed our goats too, I am nervous about possible deaths that I might have to deal with.

If you don't have a digger, how in the world can you dig a big enough/deep enough hole for larger livestock? I have seen people say they leave them out for coyotes, but won't that just create a problem with predators looking to your place for food?

And geez, what do you do with cattle or horses when they pass away?

Our old tractor doesn't have a front PTO, and buying a back hoe is big bucks.

How do you get rid of corpses?
My compost piles and materials are enough to take care of the issues without digging any holes.
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  #26  
Old 01/10/13, 04:14 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rambler View Post
There are legal issues in many states.

Rendering plant.

Burry.

Burn.

Composte.

Leave em lay.


Composting works well for things smaller than a cow. Place a lot of cornstalks, straw, or old hay around them, keep the moisture right, and they will break down into nice compost with little problems if you do it right, probably the best way to go, it takes some old starw/hay of some kind, but you get back good fertilizer.

Some locations have a cow about harming the groundwater if you burry them.

Like you, I hate to put out bait for the pretators.

Burning, you need a big fire, lots of brush, and get the critter on top or the middle, and have the wind the right way, it won't be nice for a bit but it does take care of the problem.

Rendering plant, they put so many rules and restrictions on these most went out of business, costs a lot to use them unfortunately.

--->Paul
Thats why I live in the county and not town limits on an acrage of at least 10 acres.
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  #27  
Old 01/10/13, 04:22 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by earthkitty View Post
How long does this process take?
Depends on materials used and mositure content. I would say 6 months min to make compost in ideal conditions. Maybe a year max. Must be covered at least by 2' of material.
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  #28  
Old 01/10/13, 05:10 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Indiana, USA
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Some landfills will take dead animals, at least in IN.

If buried here, they supposed to be at least 4' under. If they are composted, other domestic animals are not allowed access to the pile and rain runoff must be controlled.

I now have a backhoe, but the dead animals are all real small.

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  #29  
Old 01/10/13, 05:12 PM
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by earthkitty View Post
So here is another question...if you feed your dogs a dead sheep/goat, will that make them more inclined to go after live sheep/goats?

I read about a guy who had a large flock of sheep with some LGD's out in the field, and this was a commerical operation where no one lived on the land, just the flock and their guardians. When he would go to check on them, if he found dead sheep he would throw them out for the LGDs to eat. I figured it was a bad idea to have the dogs that guard the sheep learn that sheep meat tastes pretty good.
My LGDs are the "clean up crew". They will not touch a live animal, or even one that is down and sick. However, if I have to put one down I drag it over to where I normally feed them and call the alpha male. He then knows that it's OK to eat.

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  #30  
Old 01/10/13, 05:21 PM
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Pour lime on em to keep the stink down.

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  #31  
Old 01/10/13, 05:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crispin View Post
I have used a big fire to take care of that problem.
This is our method.

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  #32  
Old 01/10/13, 05:28 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
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We had a wildlife biologist leave a deer carcass out (with cameras and all) for research on scavengers. It was stripped to bones by the third day. What one magpie knows they all know, apparently. We didn't smell anything--course we did this in cold weather, but it wasn't more than a football field away from the house.

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  #33  
Old 01/10/13, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by rambler View Post
Nice tractor, 2000 or 3000!

--->Paul
I love the way it looks, and for being so old it runs like a champ. I found it on craigslist. Reminds me of something that would be animated on CARS.
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  #34  
Old 01/10/13, 05:45 PM
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I was also going to suggest lime or wood ash to help the animal decompose faster and keep the smell down. How feral is your place? Do you have scavengers that will take care of the carcass? If so, it should be down to scattered bones in about 1-2 weeks. Not much time for it to stink.

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  #35  
Old 01/10/13, 05:46 PM
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We compost them to recover the nutrients.

Lay down a 18" thick layer of carbon (hay, straw, woodchips, sawdust, brush...).
Put the carcass on the layer of carbon.
Puncture the rumen so it doesn't explode - messy.
Put 18" of carbon on top of that.
Protect it from scavengers.
You can flip it in a few months or just leave it for a year.
Plant pumpkins and other heavy feeders on the pile.
Spread the rich soil amendment on the orchards and gardens.

We have composted pigs as large as 1,700 lbs this way. All that is left is a grey stain. The bones dissolve too.

See:

http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2010/06/25/bigun-tusks/
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2011/09/02/s...pkins-compost/
http://sugarmtnfarm.com/2009/05/04/death-on-the-farm/

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  #36  
Old 01/10/13, 09:33 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunbee View Post
We had a wildlife biologist leave a deer carcass out (with cameras and all) for research on scavengers. It was stripped to bones by the third day. What one magpie knows they all know, apparently. We didn't smell anything--course we did this in cold weather, but it wasn't more than a football field away from the house.
Same here - I've seen dead cows gone within 48 hours. Gone, bones and all. Leaving dead animals out for scavengers makes the most sense to me. But we have plenty of property and plenty of woods to drag stuff off away from the house.

Not a worry about drawing predators as far as I'm concerned. Scavengers and predators are on the watch and hunt all the time. You leaving something for them to eat isn't going to draw them to your live animals any more than they already are drawn to them. Trust me they know you have livestock already.
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  #37  
Old 01/10/13, 10:27 PM
 
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We have vultures here. It is annoying to see them circling around all the time, but it is amazing how quickly they can take care of a carcass! Hours not days!

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  #38  
Old 01/10/13, 10:51 PM
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Location: Alaska
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When I was a teenager my horse broke his neck on state land and my Dad called some guy a few counties over who had large cats. (Lions and tigers) to come get him for food. The guy tried to charge us but we refused to pay. Either he wanted 1000 pounds of free animal food or not. He did. This was in Florida.

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  #39  
Old 01/10/13, 10:53 PM
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I compost road kills every week. if you follow highlands advice in msg 35, you'll be fine. no smell, 6 - 12 months later you have rich soil/fertilizer. The only part i don't like about the process is cutting open the gut. I picked up an armdillo this week that had been crushed enough i didn't have to mess with him. but the otter, way cute otter, was still whole, only a little blood coming from his mouth. So he had to get gut cut.

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  #40  
Old 01/11/13, 12:49 AM
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
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I know that some people throw dead chickens into the trash, and the larges animals we have had die was a small donkey. Everyone I know burns them. I have a pit that I use. Once everything but the bones are burnt, I have been told it is sanitary. At the risk of sounding very ignorant, this is the first I am hearing of people burying large animals. Everyone I've ever heard on the topic says the same thing, that if you leave it coyotes will come and attack the rest of your animals. The only other disposal that I have heard in these parts is if they are very small, some throw them into the garbage, yet, it is talked of as if that is something that is not ethical, and people shouldn't, though I don't know if it's legal.

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