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  #81  
Old 02/10/16, 04:28 PM
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The first line of defense was to arm the locals
Show us your guard animal - Guard Animals
Show us your guard animal - Guard Animals
And if they make through them they got the best backup
Show us your guard animal - Guard Animals
HE DONT LIKES IT WHEN YOU DISTURB HIS BEAUTY SLEEP
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  #82  
Old 02/10/16, 10:50 PM
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English Shepherd? I like his coat. We are looking at getting a second to back up Deano pictured above with his coon kill. I have full confidence in his skill at dispatching the small vermin. But I worry his bravery borders on foolhardy with the coyotes. He's a tough bugger, but Chuck Norris not withstanding, multiple opponents is a tall order.
Axil is Border Collie, Aussie and Sheltie. His coat is silky soft but he does lose hair like my little guy. He is smart as a whip, learns more tricks then we ever teach him. He opens doors which is cute and takes my dogs leash in his mouth to walk him around.
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  #83  
Old 02/10/16, 11:35 PM
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I decided to forgo the modern notion of what a livestock guardian dog is. George S Patton believed that defense was never as effective as attacking. Napoleon was kind of fond of this strategy, too. So I went with some of the heritage American livestock guardian breeds.

Of course, this isn't for everyone. It requires quite a bit of training, and some fancy tracking systems, and often quite a bit of walking. Helps to not live in a subdivision, too. The closest thing you can come to scrambling some jets in response to a marauding varmint.

Here is a picture of one of my favorites. She is a Trigg.
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  #84  
Old 02/14/16, 07:06 AM
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This is "Mendell", he is mild mannered, but when the fox comes around, he goes into chase mode*
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  #85  
Old 02/15/16, 07:44 AM
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Ah barnbuilder.....while they're out "attacking" who is home guarding your livestock? Also I'm interested in hearing where the made up term "American Heritage Livestock Guardian" comes from. Holy crap, this is right up there with the "Spanish Ranch Mastiff" and the "Colorado Mountain Dog.....if you want Livestock Guardian Dogs, they are bred to stay home and guard the flocks, that's the job description, if you want a hunting dog get a hound, and for the love of god, take a course in genetics before breeding the two and expecting to get the "best of both worlds" it's the same thing people try to do when crossing a herding dog and an LGD, and it's a fairy tale that usually ends up badly for everyone involved, especially the poor, confused dog.
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  #86  
Old 02/15/16, 07:55 AM
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My JRT's, 8 year old female litter mates.
Right now, I live in a tiny apartment. They have adjusted to the noise and smells, but if someone stands too close to my door, for more than 10 seconds? They go ballistic.

They are my first alert; absolutely the smartest dogs I have ever owned.
I love this breed and I am pretty sure, I will own Jacks for the rest of my life!!!
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  #87  
Old 02/15/16, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Foxglove View Post
Ah barnbuilder.....while they're out "attacking" who is home guarding your livestock? Also I'm interested in hearing where the made up term "American Heritage Livestock Guardian" comes from. Holy crap, this is right up there with the "Spanish Ranch Mastiff" and the "Colorado Mountain Dog.....if you want Livestock Guardian Dogs, they are bred to stay home and guard the flocks, that's the job description, if you want a hunting dog get a hound, and for the love of god, take a course in genetics before breeding the two and expecting to get the "best of both worlds" it's the same thing people try to do when crossing a herding dog and an LGD, and it's a fairy tale that usually ends up badly for everyone involved, especially the poor, confused dog.
Usually, varmints are nocturnal, unless they have been allowed to get completely out of hand. This means you can unkennel the pack on a track first thing in the morning with no fears of leaving the homestead unguarded.
I would never dream of crossing the poorly built, easily overheated, mutts with silly made up names and stories to go along with them into my line of performance bred hounds. Triggs, Julys, Plotts, Redbones, Blueticks,and Walkers as well as the various Cur breeds have had a pretty good track record as offensive livestock guarding dogs in this country for hundreds of years. Some of the cur breeds will do everything a LGD will do in terms of staying on the place and co-habitating with livestock and guarding, and you can tell them to get in the truck and take them hunting. I had several that would stay with the chickens and goats until you walked past them with a gun, and then they left with you to go hunting.

Sure you can pay an arm an a leg for a fancy dog that will die about the time it quits eating chickens, with the idea that it's incessant barking will magically remove predators, but where is the fun in that? A dog from the local animal shelter that barks from a fenced yard will be almost as effective. In many cases, the people that are breeding LGDs didn't have a predator problem to begin with, outside of hearing coyotes, and they blame the lack of predation on their dogs, and sell pups accordingly. When in fact, their homestead has never had a predation problem and likely never would due to the way it is situated. At least with hounds you can see animals in a tree, to kill or not, (if you make them climb a tree and have their picture taken, often they decide not to be so brazen in the future!) You can have fun with friends and neighbors and family in the process.

In areas that the hounds get a chance to run, the random backyard barking dog or fancy LGD is WAY more effective, the local predators see domestic canines as a threat and not so much as a food source.
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  #88  
Old 02/15/16, 04:26 PM
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Usually, varmints are nocturnal, unless they have been allowed to get completely out of hand. This means you can unkennel the pack on a track first thing in the morning with no fears of leaving the homestead unguarded.
I would never dream of crossing the poorly built, easily overheated, mutts with silly made up names and stories to go along with them into my line of performance bred hounds. Triggs, Julys, Plotts, Redbones, Blueticks,and Walkers as well as the various Cur breeds have had a pretty good track record as offensive livestock guarding dogs in this country for hundreds of years. Some of the cur breeds will do everything a LGD will do in terms of staying on the place and co-habitating with livestock and guarding, and you can tell them to get in the truck and take them hunting. I had several that would stay with the chickens and goats until you walked past them with a gun, and then they left with you to go hunting.

Sure you can pay an arm an a leg for a fancy dog that will die about the time it quits eating chickens, with the idea that it's incessant barking will magically remove predators, but where is the fun in that? A dog from the local animal shelter that barks from a fenced yard will be almost as effective. In many cases, the people that are breeding LGDs didn't have a predator problem to begin with, outside of hearing coyotes, and they blame the lack of predation on their dogs, and sell pups accordingly. When in fact, their homestead has never had a predation problem and likely never would due to the way it is situated. At least with hounds you can see animals in a tree, to kill or not, (if you make them climb a tree and have their picture taken, often they decide not to be so brazen in the future!) You can have fun with friends and neighbors and family in the process.

In areas that the hounds get a chance to run, the random backyard barking dog or fancy LGD is WAY more effective, the local predators see domestic canines as a threat and not so much as a food source.
Oh absolutely! Because a high prey drive is what ALL LGD's should have! It's especially awesome when that fabulous, all purpose guardian dog/hound participates in the nightly lamb races by chasing down the little buggers and chewing on them until someone shows up and pulls them off (or shoots them). Hounds that don't bark are a pretty interesting premise as well, since using their voices are a big part of what they're bred to do....or maybe you debark them and that's why you need the tracking devices? You seem to have made a lot of presumptions with no basis in fact regarding dogs and specifically LGD's for someone who clearly knows nothing about their use. Although I will agree most backyard LGD breeders don't know what they're doing either. You said yourself, that you need tracking devices and long walks to find your dogs....I don't know many ranchers who have the time or inclination to go traipsing off across the countryside trying to find dogs who should be with their livestock in the first place. Most I know would just go ahead and move their sheep and leave that useless animal behind. I guess my point is there is no such thing as an all purpose dog, believe it or not, that's how purebreds came about in the first place. If you have a hound that you have to shock the ever lovin' crap out of to turn it into a guardian dog, even if it does resonate with the cheap crowd, that's still a pretty dishonest representation, no matter how you try to sugar coat it.
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  #89  
Old 02/15/16, 04:34 PM
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My sweet girl, Charity, last name Case.
She is back in Massachusetts on a friends farm, I miss her terribly, but it just wouldn't be fair to bring her here.
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  #90  
Old 02/15/16, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Foxglove View Post
Oh absolutely! Because a high prey drive is what ALL LGD's should have! It's especially awesome when that fabulous, all purpose guardian dog/hound participates in the nightly lamb races by chasing down the little buggers and chewing on them until someone shows up and pulls them off (or shoots them). Hounds that don't bark are a pretty interesting premise as well, since using their voices are a big part of what they're bred to do....or maybe you debark them and that's why you need the tracking devices? You seem to have made a lot of presumptions with no basis in fact regarding dogs and specifically LGD's for someone who clearly knows nothing about their use. Although I will agree most backyard LGD breeders don't know what they're doing either. You said yourself, that you need tracking devices and long walks to find your dogs....I don't know many ranchers who have the time or inclination to go traipsing off across the countryside trying to find dogs who should be with their livestock in the first place. Most I know would just go ahead and move their sheep and leave that useless animal behind. I guess my point is there is no such thing as an all purpose dog, believe it or not, that's how purebreds came about in the first place. If you have a hound that you have to shock the ever lovin' crap out of to turn it into a guardian dog, even if it does resonate with the cheap crowd, that's still a pretty dishonest representation, no matter how you try to sugar coat it.
Yep, it's pretty obvious that you don't know a lot about dogs. I didn't say it was for everyone. By all means, if you want to go out and spend a bunch of money on several livestock guardian dogs in a quest to find one that will actually stay and protect your stock, that is your business. I'm just pointing out what works for me, which is the same thing that worked for many generations in this country. Proactive livestock guardians. Housed separately from livestock. When need arises, a marauding predator's worst nightmare. In the case of the cur breeds, they can do anything that a LGD can do, and pen stock on command, as well as leave to go hunting, on command, with no shocking whatsoever. I had a blackmouth cur that would bed down with the sheep and keep an eye on the chickens, break up rooster fights, and you could say "get him" and she would completely dominate the rankest wayward bull. She would set tooth to a bull and then gently nudge lambs into a pen. Wouldn't herd anything unless you said the word. Walk out with a gun and she would be by your side, ready to tree bobcats and coon, but never leave the place when left alone. But there would be bodies to dispose of if something ventured in. You have a very narrow minded outlook as to what some of these breeds were developed for. Must be a LGD salesman.
Never tried to put a hound in with livestock, there are some that would probably do it, but their principal duty is to be set on the track of a predator, and tree or bay it. Mine are quite good at it, in fact I have used them to catch persistent predators in instances where LGDs have failed. I have no use for a dog that I can't use for a task. And having a dog, even kenneled, that barks when something comes around, that pees when you walk around the perimeter will do most of the good that LGDs will do in most of the instances that they are used in. I have seen plenty of them, have seen some that did good work, many of them were actually a bigger liability than the predators they were supposed to be keeping away. Most of them have way too much hair to be effective for most of the year in many parts of this country. Most are way bigger than they need to be to be healthy and effective for the long lifespan you would want one to live, once you found a good one. A 40 pound plott is more dog than most 100 pound LGDs, and not nearly as prone to heatstroke when the chips are down.
Sure, if you only have a three acre pasture, the popular LGDs are right for the application, but many times aren't warranted.

I'm a little undersold on LGDs, because of some of the things I have seen as one employed in the work of catching predators that have gone to the dark side. I am really not opposed to other people having them. Just pointing out that great grand pappies canine of choice for protecting livestock is still in use today. I just came here to share a picture, didn't know I would be attacked by the highly insecure LGD people that must lurk here. Sorry.
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  #91  
Old 02/15/16, 07:09 PM
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Yep, it's pretty obvious that you don't know a lot about dogs. I didn't say it was for everyone. By all means, if you want to go out and spend a bunch of money on several livestock guardian dogs in a quest to find one that will actually stay and protect your stock, that is your business. I'm just pointing out what works for me, which is the same thing that worked for many generations in this country. Proactive livestock guardians. Housed separately from livestock. When need arises, a marauding predator's worst nightmare. In the case of the cur breeds, they can do anything that a LGD can do, and pen stock on command, as well as leave to go hunting, on command, with no shocking whatsoever. I had a blackmouth cur that would bed down with the sheep and keep an eye on the chickens, break up rooster fights, and you could say "get him" and she would completely dominate the rankest wayward bull. She would set tooth to a bull and then gently nudge lambs into a pen. Wouldn't herd anything unless you said the word. Walk out with a gun and she would be by your side, ready to tree bobcats and coon, but never leave the place when left alone. But there would be bodies to dispose of if something ventured in. You have a very narrow minded outlook as to what some of these breeds were developed for. Must be a LGD salesman.
Never tried to put a hound in with livestock, there are some that would probably do it, but their principal duty is to be set on the track of a predator, and tree or bay it. Mine are quite good at it, in fact I have used them to catch persistent predators in instances where LGDs have failed. I have no use for a dog that I can't use for a task. And having a dog, even kenneled, that barks when something comes around, that pees when you walk around the perimeter will do most of the good that LGDs will do in most of the instances that they are used in. I have seen plenty of them, have seen some that did good work, many of them were actually a bigger liability than the predators they were supposed to be keeping away. Most of them have way too much hair to be effective for most of the year in many parts of this country. Most are way bigger than they need to be to be healthy and effective for the long lifespan you would want one to live, once you found a good one. A 40 pound plott is more dog than most 100 pound LGDs, and not nearly as prone to heatstroke when the chips are down.
Sure, if you only have a three acre pasture, the popular LGDs are right for the application, but many times aren't warranted.

I'm a little undersold on LGDs, because of some of the things I have seen as one employed in the work of catching predators that have gone to the dark side. I am really not opposed to other people having them. Just pointing out that great grand pappies canine of choice for protecting livestock is still in use today. I just came here to share a picture, didn't know I would be attacked by the highly insecure LGD people that must lurk here. Sorry.
I do agree, the territorial marking seems to be half the battle in keeping the coyotes away. Our farm is crawling with them, I often see them on the hay fields and forested areas, but they don't come near our pastures.
And I agree as well that a dog doesn't have to be an LGD breed to guard your animals. This one's mother is husky/wolf but she is smart and very trainable. I'm sure some people think we're crazy, probably the same people that think we're crazy for free ranging our chickens but we've had no problems.
And if it works, go with it.
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  #92  
Old 02/15/16, 09:20 PM
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Looks like she is getting the job done tree-farmer. I'll take what a dog is doing right now over what a dog's ancestors did 6,000 years ago any day. Many of the famous ancient breeds were only as good as the hand of the Basque sheepherder they were raised under, not all that distinct genetically.

One thing I have noticed in working with animal damage cases, speaking of the "just marking territory is half the battle" thing. Sheep that are familiar with dogs, any dogs, act a lot differently towards a canine than those raised without canine interaction. It is my observation that there is a lower incidence of the onset of coyote predation in herds that have frequent non-threatening dog interactions. Collies, farm mutts, makes no difference. Coyotes need a good flight response to be able to attack effectively until they gain a good deal of experience.
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  #93  
Old 02/16/16, 11:11 AM
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Yep, it's pretty obvious that you don't know a lot about dogs. I didn't say it was for everyone. By all means, if you want to go out and spend a bunch of money on several livestock guardian dogs in a quest to find one that will actually stay and protect your stock, that is your business. I'm just pointing out what works for me, which is the same thing that worked for many generations in this country. Proactive livestock guardians. Housed separately from livestock. When need arises, a marauding predator's worst nightmare. In the case of the cur breeds, they can do anything that a LGD can do, and pen stock on command, as well as leave to go hunting, on command, with no shocking whatsoever. I had a blackmouth cur that would bed down with the sheep and keep an eye on the chickens, break up rooster fights, and you could say "get him" and she would completely dominate the rankest wayward bull. She would set tooth to a bull and then gently nudge lambs into a pen. Wouldn't herd anything unless you said the word. Walk out with a gun and she would be by your side, ready to tree bobcats and coon, but never leave the place when left alone. But there would be bodies to dispose of if something ventured in. You have a very narrow minded outlook as to what some of these breeds were developed for. Must be a LGD salesman.
Never tried to put a hound in with livestock, there are some that would probably do it, but their principal duty is to be set on the track of a predator, and tree or bay it. Mine are quite good at it, in fact I have used them to catch persistent predators in instances where LGDs have failed. I have no use for a dog that I can't use for a task. And having a dog, even kenneled, that barks when something comes around, that pees when you walk around the perimeter will do most of the good that LGDs will do in most of the instances that they are used in. I have seen plenty of them, have seen some that did good work, many of them were actually a bigger liability than the predators they were supposed to be keeping away. Most of them have way too much hair to be effective for most of the year in many parts of this country. Most are way bigger than they need to be to be healthy and effective for the long lifespan you would want one to live, once you found a good one. A 40 pound plott is more dog than most 100 pound LGDs, and not nearly as prone to heatstroke when the chips are down.
Sure, if you only have a three acre pasture, the popular LGDs are right for the application, but many times aren't warranted.

I'm a little undersold on LGDs, because of some of the things I have seen as one employed in the work of catching predators that have gone to the dark side. I am really not opposed to other people having them. Just pointing out that great grand pappies canine of choice for protecting livestock is still in use today. I just came here to share a picture, didn't know I would be attacked by the highly insecure LGD people that must lurk here. Sorry.
Whoa.....and I thought you didn't like all those cute stories that LGD people have about their dogs! Those were some ADORABLE stories you just shared! I don't know where you get the idea that LGD's are prone to heatstroke, or that most only weigh 100 lbs. my largest male is 38" at the shoulder and 220 lbs., I live in the high desert in NV where our temps regularly go well over 100 degrees in the summer and he can move from one pasture to the next in seconds, so far no one has shown any sign of heatstroke, so who the heck are you talking to?? I could tell many stories and provide photos of LGD's protecting their flocks and killing large predators, (not skunks and raccoons) in the process, although if you ever once had bothered to do an ounce of research on LGD's you would know that they are primarily non-lethal protection. Unfortunately, there is a huge cartel of idiots, who are trying to convince people otherwise.....apparently those are the one's you've been listening to. Also you completely missed my point, which was there are no such thing as "all purpose" dogs, even though I know there is yet another growing cartel of genetically misinformed jackwagons trying to peddle their Plott Hound/Pyrenees crosses all over Craigslist and Facebook, have you even seen this or is your head so buried in the sand that you only see what you want? Now if you'll excuse me I have a German Shepherd/Papillon cross that is going through Schutzhund training this morning, then it's off to her therapy dog group this afternoon
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  #94  
Old 02/16/16, 11:43 AM
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Why would anyone cross a perfectly good plott hound on a pyrenese? That would be stupid. Bring your giant dog to the southeast in the summer time, I will show you how he can die of a heat stroke or lay in the shade while coyotes carry off a flock. All I know is what I've seen personally while doing damage control on farms. And what I've read published from scientific research. I ignore all of the blogs of experts that are trying to sell overpriced, genetically deficient garbage to unsuspecting people. The biggest problem that the LGD breeds have is that we can't effectively cull the roughly 25% to 50% that necessarily need to be culled, and always have been. At one time their ancient breeders would have killed the unfit and threw them in a ditch, now they sell them for 400 bucks, and I can understand the economic and moral considerations, just saying.

I have never advocated using a hound to hold a defensive position, I advocated using a hound as a cavalry unit. Of which they can be quite effective. I can drop a well trained hound on a coyote track, and with a gps collar grid waypoints and lace every fence crossing with snares and find the denning area and pretty much completely eradicate sheep predation in an area. With some good recall training, they can be controlled to one property, if needed, or they can keep on running to gun. I certainly don't advocate tainting good hound blood with any of the LGD breeds.

Curs are a different situation entirely. They can perform very much in the capacity of territorial defense dog. You seem to be a self proclaimed authority on canines, have you ever reared a black mouth cur in a farm setting? Have you ever had a well trained hound? From your comments, I would venture a no. If I paid 600 bucks for something that had less than a fifty percent chance of operating beyond 5 years and had a 25% chance of not working period, I would try to be pushing them on everyone else, too. Because fact is, the only way you can get LGDs to pencil out is if you do puppy sales along with their protection duties.
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  #95  
Old 02/16/16, 02:27 PM
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Please remember this is a thread for photos. Sure some comments are expected but if you want to start a discussion please start a new thread! TBH some great points are lost, buried here!! Thanks!!
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  #96  
Old 02/19/16, 09:51 AM
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Love our pyranees.
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  #97  
Old 02/22/16, 08:03 AM
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Why would anyone cross a perfectly good plott hound on a pyrenese? That would be stupid. Bring your giant dog to the southeast in the summer time, I will show you how he can die of a heat stroke or lay in the shade while coyotes carry off a flock. All I know is what I've seen personally while doing damage control on farms. And what I've read published from scientific research. I ignore all of the blogs of experts that are trying to sell overpriced, genetically deficient garbage to unsuspecting people. The biggest problem that the LGD breeds have is that we can't effectively cull the roughly 25% to 50% that necessarily need to be culled, and always have been. At one time their ancient breeders would have killed the unfit and threw them in a ditch, now they sell them for 400 bucks, and I can understand the economic and moral considerations, just saying.

I have never advocated using a hound to hold a defensive position, I advocated using a hound as a cavalry unit. Of which they can be quite effective. I can drop a well trained hound on a coyote track, and with a gps collar grid waypoints and lace every fence crossing with snares and find the denning area and pretty much completely eradicate sheep predation in an area. With some good recall training, they can be controlled to one property, if needed, or they can keep on running to gun. I certainly don't advocate tainting good hound blood with any of the LGD breeds.

Curs are a different situation entirely. They can perform very much in the capacity of territorial defense dog. You seem to be a self proclaimed authority on canines, have you ever reared a black mouth cur in a farm setting? Have you ever had a well trained hound? From your comments, I would venture a no. If I paid 600 bucks for something that had less than a fifty percent chance of operating beyond 5 years and had a 25% chance of not working period, I would try to be pushing them on everyone else, too. Because fact is, the only way you can get LGDs to pencil out is if you do puppy sales along with their protection duties.
Apparently, you aren't paying attention....check out Fort Lonesome Farm Dogs and Tattooed Homestead pages on Facebook, they're both peddling Pyrenees/Plott crosses. You can denigrate something you know nothing about until you're blue in the face, and it still doesn't make you right. I lived in Rossville GA with my dogs and never had one drop dead, or even look mildly ill in the heat, so you're argument is still invalid. Of course you keep referring to breeders with high priced garbage so again, it sounds like you hang out with exactly what you seem to be implying I am. I'm still trying to figure out where your proclivity to high and mightiness comes from, as your statements regarding LGD breeds are so totally ignorant. If you're referring to the Livestock Guardian Dog Project, sponsored by the Coppinger's close to 40 years ago, most of those premises have been invalidated. If you're referring to the so far incomplete studies being conducted currently by the USDA, I'm sure you know about how inappropriate their choice of breeds are as well as some of the methods being used. Of course as with anything our federal government is involved with, these studies are being run by bureaucrats who don't know anything about dogs, and who have not done a very good job vetting the people and/or breeds they are using, for example, using Eastern European breeds who are characteristically not white, and suggesting that the handlers paint the dogs white as apparently the sheep involved in the study only like white dogs. As for breeders, there are good and bad ones, just like with any breed and unfortunately you don't always get what you pay for as everyone wants to hop on the breeder bandwagon and make a buck. Quite honestly your spiel just sounds like another instance of some guy trying to reinvent the wheel, hounds have never been meant to guard, they hunt, if they're barking is keeping the skunks and raccoon's away, fabulous, however when they leave to go chase a varmint your stock is still left unguarded when the big predators show up. This was the point I was trying to make in the first place, a point you chose to ignore, and for some reason decided to take offense at.
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Old 02/22/16, 09:21 AM
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Your point is pointless as you've missed the point. Turn appropriate hound(s) loose and said varmint is no longer part of the equation. Large predator, small predator, makes no difference. Livestock protection through predator eradication. Has worked for eons.
As per admin instructions why don't we leave this thread as a place for posting pictures.
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Old 02/22/16, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by barnbilder View Post
Usually, varmints are nocturnal, unless they have been allowed to get completely out of hand. This means you can unkennel the pack on a track first thing in the morning with no fears of leaving the homestead unguarded.
I would never dream of crossing the poorly built, easily overheated, mutts with silly made up names and stories to go along with them into my line of performance bred hounds. Triggs, Julys, Plotts, Redbones, Blueticks,and Walkers as well as the various Cur breeds have had a pretty good track record as offensive livestock guarding dogs in this country for hundreds of years. Some of the cur breeds will do everything a LGD will do in terms of staying on the place and co-habitating with livestock and guarding, and you can tell them to get in the truck and take them hunting. I had several that would stay with the chickens and goats until you walked past them with a gun, and then they left with you to go hunting.

Sure you can pay an arm an a leg for a fancy dog that will die about the time it quits eating chickens, with the idea that it's incessant barking will magically remove predators, but where is the fun in that? A dog from the local animal shelter that barks from a fenced yard will be almost as effective. In many cases, the people that are breeding LGDs didn't have a predator problem to begin with, outside of hearing coyotes, and they blame the lack of predation on their dogs, and sell pups accordingly. When in fact, their homestead has never had a predation problem and likely never would due to the way it is situated. At least with hounds you can see animals in a tree, to kill or not, (if you make them climb a tree and have their picture taken, often they decide not to be so brazen in the future!) You can have fun with friends and neighbors and family in the process.

In areas that the hounds get a chance to run, the random backyard barking dog or fancy LGD is WAY more effective, the local predators see domestic canines as a threat and not so much as a food source.

A black mouth cur is a very hard dog to beat on a homestead ...
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  #100  
Old 02/22/16, 02:56 PM
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Love our pyranees.
We have two full blood and two 3/4 pyranees X 1/4 lab/anatolian mix. All are raised with and amongst the sheep, calves, pigs, goats, chickens, geese and ducks. All do their jobs. We live where there were coyote problems until we got here with these guys/gals. We also lived deep in the woods a few years back and never had predator problems due to the dogs. Love these dogs. Granted we do condition our dogs to the animals before we just throw them in there with no observations but so far after 30 year of pyranees dogs no problem.
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