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  #21  
Old 09/19/12, 04:52 PM
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Have you tried mixing in alfalfa seed with your other grains? Maybe a little fresh alfalfa would change their minds.

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  #22  
Old 09/19/12, 04:57 PM
 
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Carla- Are the roots a hardish mat when you feed it to them? I glanced at a display at the fair and I thought the root system was some sort of cellulose mat system. It looked like an air conditioner filter. If you were feeding loose sprouts could that be your problem? I'm wondering because I also thought about starting it in big jars like you would for home sprouts. If I pulled out loose handfuls though and they wouldn't eat them that would drive me crazy. They were feeding goats using the system they had at the fair. It looked like they slid whole trays into a v-shaped feeder and the goats pulled the sprouts out.

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  #23  
Old 09/19/12, 05:00 PM
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CJ, feed it to them when they are REALLY hungry. Like anything, it may take a while for them to get used to it.

If you have full mats, with a grass side and a root side, you might try spraying a sweet water on the root side, either really weak molasses water, syrup water, or even sugar water. Then they might start thinking of the root side as a "treat".

If you go that route, every two days, add less of the sweetened to your water spray, until you are adding none at all.

When hungry enough, your goats WILL eat it. And no matter how finicky and "Her Royal Highness" disapproves goats get, no otherwise healthy goat ever starved itself to death when food was available.

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  #24  
Old 09/19/12, 05:11 PM
 
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andabigmac, that mat you saw is the roots and it's all innertwined together. It pulls apart easily. On the underside there will be some seeds that haven't sprouted, I really thought that would get the goats attention but noooooooo, picky things.

I will keep trying different things. I so badly want Dora to be eating this fodder. My jersey, Ellie wants to eat it. I just need to go get some molasses and she will be easily tricked. That girl would do anything for a little bit of molasses. I bet this fodder makes for some yummy milk!

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  #25  
Old 09/19/12, 05:20 PM
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I am going to try it out with oat seeds. Oats are pretty cheap right now, and it won't cost me much to get started.

It will be pretty simple to get my girls to eat it. All I'll have to do is, one day when I am heading to my mothers for the day, just put this in the feeder when I lock them up in the corral instead of alfalfa pellets, which is what I normally put in the corral if I am going to lock them up while I am gone.

Tomorrow, I will pick up seed an plastic covering. Saturday, I will put it all together have stuff started...which means the following Saturday I will post on how well it works.

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  #26  
Old 09/19/12, 06:31 PM
 
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Caliann, I hope your goats aren't fodder snobs like mine are.......lol.

I have wheat right now, the study brought up in KFC said that barley was most nutritious but I would sprout just about anything to see if they would eat it. Caliann, I do know one lady that tried with oats and the number of oats that actually sprouted was pretty low, could just be her supply. Truely, the sky and your wallet is the limit on what you can sprout but I understand that milo is not a good one to sprout because in the first few days of spouting it produces a toxin. I think if you wait till like day 7 or 8 it is safe but who wants to find out.

Happy sprouting!
Carla

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  #27  
Old 09/19/12, 08:18 PM
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Hmmmm....I could likely get it tested to see if it is toxic with a sample batch if I wanted to try Milo....but, there are other things to try first.

Oats, wheat, barley, etc., should all be available to me in 50lb bags for less than $15 a bag. Right now, I am mainly interested in it replacing *hay*. My calculations tell me that for equal dry matter, it would come to the equivilent of paying $2 a bale for quality hay. I can live with that.

If it replaces grain as well, that is just a bonus. But right now, I would like a good, space saving solution for hay. This looks to be it.

And mine WILL eat it. LOL I am a mean Mommy, and I will lock them up in the corral with ONLY this to graze on until they decide they LIKE it. And I will tell them that there are starving goats in China who would be GRATEFUL for the fodder I give them!

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  #28  
Old 09/19/12, 08:53 PM
 
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My understanding is that this doesn't replace hay but it does replace grain. You can get by with feeding a lower quality hay but they still need the long stems for proper digestion. I could be totally wrong...but I am gonna keep plugging away at it.

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  #29  
Old 09/19/12, 08:53 PM
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This guy posts almost every week on Idaho Craigslist offering consultations on the Fodder system. He doesn't have an Idaho area code so I don't know where he lives or if he's posting on every Craigslist he can find but I thought I would share.

Paying Too Much For Hay?

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  #30  
Old 09/19/12, 09:13 PM
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6" *is* long stem.

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  #31  
Old 09/19/12, 11:16 PM
 
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The display they had at the fair had the goats with the sprouts in one feeder and oat straw in the other. They used the straw for long stems and filler and the barley grass for nutrition.

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  #32  
Old 09/19/12, 11:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CJBegins View Post
Emily, my question is how did those farmers get their animals to eat the fodder. Mine really want the grass but when they realize the roots are coming too they drop it. The goats totally turn their nose up at it. I really want this to work!

Carla
Just like any new thing, said it took a few days for them to really cotton on to the idea. But they did start eating it, without doing anything special as far as I know.
One of the dairy famers also is a goat breeder. She lives a town away. Here is her post on the fodder system with cattle and goats.
She is a member of one of my Yahoo groups.

"Good morning to all. For those of you suffering through the drought and in short
supply of forages or looking for a good source I'd like to share this
information. We recently put in a hydroponic fodder production system. It is a
way to have a steady, high quality source of forage. The feed value of the
product is very high and we are at present able to eliminate grain feeding from
our dairy cattle herd and milking goats. The particular system we are using is
made by All Season Greens All Season Greens | Easily Produce Your Own Low Cost, Highly Nutritious, Living Feed, 365 Days a Year! . But there are many
other systems available. I'm not giving their web address as a promotion but as
a place for people to investigate these systems and see if hydroponics might
help their needs for feed. The goats and cows love them and after the initial
change in feed are now eagerly devouring the greens. You can see pictures of our
herds feeding on the greens at our farm's Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Ma...m/183977297948

The goats are doing very well with the change and actually took interest before
the cows the first day we introduced them all to the greens. Our nutritionist
,from the feed mill, after looking at the test results of the greens said that
one could completely eliminate grain feeding using the greens. Eventually we
hope to get our second pod so we can also replace most of our hay feeding as
well. Hope this information might be of help to some of you who are wondering
how you are going to feed your herds."
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  #33  
Old 09/19/12, 11:27 PM
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Was told by the fodder systems experienced farmers that oats sprout fine but don't seem to grow well unless mixed with other sprouts. But he does use them as they are such a good food. He reccomended mixing them with other seeds.

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  #34  
Old 09/20/12, 12:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliannG View Post
6" *is* long stem.
Yes, but it's soft and tender. Not enough fibrous material for good digestion. Like the difference between hay and that first spring grass. I'd like to try it too, but I can totally see this blowing right through their systems without any added roughage.
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  #35  
Old 09/20/12, 01:20 AM
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If you still have to buy roughage and you need the grain to make up for the poor quality of the roughage I really don't see why to add the extra step of sprouting the stuff.

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  #36  
Old 09/20/12, 01:49 AM
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We would not be buying roughage. We have plenty of ground to grow our own hay and graze for all the warmer months. We do this now.
With the fodder system you can cut out all grains, and the seed you buy goes much further than the same amount of grain, as you are sprouting and feeding it as greens, 6" long. The biggest advantage in my opinion is that you can more easily go non-GMO. Also, less concentrates makes for a healthier longer lived animal in the long run, lower sommatic cell, less feet issues, etc.
But this makes feeding no grain feasable, even during the winter. It will still maintain their weight, they milk well on it, etc. And no issues with toxic feed, as many dairy farmers have had issues with in the past few years.
Even in bad hay/crop years, we would have a steady supply. The seeds you buy go *much* further than the same amount of grain. Thus, it is cheaper.
Farmers are doing it successfully and it is saving them money. We went and visited one such dairy farmer on Monday. Very interesting.
I was very skeptical at first, but now I'm rather excited about the idea.

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  #37  
Old 09/20/12, 05:24 AM
 
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Thanks Emily for sharing that information.

I am beginning to think that right now the reason I am having difficulty getting my animals to eat this stuff is because we have had some pretty good rains lately and everything is growing and green again. I haven't been feeding hay so this additional "green stuff" doesn't look very appealing to them. DH and I drove down in to the pastures last evening and there is pretty good grass growth now. I also noticed that the goats are moving farther out to get to more browse.

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  #38  
Old 09/20/12, 07:10 AM
 
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Callahan, this comment I love!

--your quote--

""And mine WILL eat it. LOL I am a mean Mommy, and I will lock them up in the corral with ONLY this to graze on until they decide they LIKE it. And I will tell them that there are starving goats in China who would be GRATEFUL for the fodder I give them!"""

I agree totally. Ive only had goats for 2 years, so I'm quite new, but I've found they sure are picky critters! I have 2 of the so-called "calm and pleasant" LM does and a ND buck, but my does will scream at me when I have to change hay.

I'm all for 'eat it or go hungry'!!!

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  #39  
Old 09/20/12, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wmsff View Post
I'm all for 'eat it or go hungry'!!!
Me too. My goats are experiencing "tough love" right now as I changed hays. Its decent hay and they will eat it...but they sure grumbled that first day.
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  #40  
Old 09/20/12, 12:41 PM
 
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Exactly! My goats are on the grateful diet also. They'll eat what's in front of them or go hungry. I wouldn't feed them garbage and I'm trying to find the best way to feed them given my limited natural resources. My goats have eaten cubes and have done well on them. They were not happy about it either. Oh well though. There was no hay to be found. Some went on strike for a few days but they came around. I hated it worse than they did probably.

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