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  #1  
Old 09/19/05, 11:50 AM
 
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Grinding feed corn for human consumption

Would there be any reason why feed corn from the feed store couldn't be used to grind for human consumption?
Thanks.
mamabear

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  #2  
Old 09/19/05, 11:55 AM
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Can't think why you couldn't - you'd need to sift it for extraneous bits, though, before you ground it. You know, chunks of corn cob, rocks, whatever!

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  #3  
Old 09/19/05, 12:00 PM
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Make sure it is good quality and fresh. Some of the stuff some feed stores have should not be fed to animals either. Otherwise, there is no reason not to eat it yourself. I have done so.

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  #4  
Old 09/19/05, 12:06 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Southern Indiana
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The Pearls' have a child raising web site (No Greater Joy) and somewhere on it Mrs Pearl talks of the winter they lived on feed corn and all the things you can do with it.

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  #5  
Old 09/19/05, 01:00 PM
In Remembrance
 
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If there is a feedmill in your area chances are you can buy it there freshly made.

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  #6  
Old 09/19/05, 01:25 PM
 
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There is a guy over on the TMEN forums (who also posts here from time to time) who is doing exactly this very thing:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/forum...?TOPIC_ID=6048

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  #7  
Old 09/19/05, 02:37 PM
r.h. in okla.
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Mammabear, I've been wondering the very same thing myself. I'm in the process of cooking some dried sweet corn that I harvested this last summer. Cooking it like a pot of pinto beans. Don't know how it's going to turn out yet. But this morning I was wondering about seeing on t.v. where they give out these 50 pound bags of whole corn to starving people in Africa and such places. It was making me wonder about the corn we buy for animal feed at the local feed stores. Only thing I could think might be wrong is all this talk about genetically modified corn that I have been hearing about.

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  #8  
Old 09/19/05, 04:20 PM
 
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Location: MN
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Some folks are just totally against genetically modified stuff, and so they have some stories to tell that scare people. Fine. That is all they are - stories.

But, the GM corn is the same as the regular corn. I'm a farmer, and for the record I have not grown an GM crops yet - for personal & financial reasons. But, this crazy fear average folks have of the stuff is just a lot of mis-information spread by a few with an agenda. Let's get over that type of fear. There are good resons to oppose new technologies from time to time. Some fear of poisoning is _not_ one of them. Grain coming from GM crops is safe for consumption. If you don't like the use of GM, or we don't like the monopolistic policies that come from it, let's address _those_ issues, and not make up pointless fears that hurt everybody...

As to using the feed store corn for food - wouldn't bother me, with a couople of considerations. It is _not_ common any more, but sometimes strong fumagents were/ are? used to keep insects out of the grain bins on the farm, at the elevator, or at the feed mill. I'd consider that - those pesticides are kinda bad for people.

There can be a lot of insects in grain crops. I'd look through it a bit. Frankly it is the same for food-grade crops, so little difference, but I'd just check on it.....

But those are small concerns, just keep an eye open. For the most part, should be as good for you as anything else.

--->Paul

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  #9  
Old 09/19/05, 04:43 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
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I think Rambler pointed out the main points very well. The only other concern I would add is that feed corn is very likely to be treated differently than human consumption corn would be. IE corn from the ground, pests, etc. It is still the same(or mighty close) but may be treated differently in the handling.

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  #10  
Old 09/19/05, 05:05 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: NW AR
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Thanks for the replies. I certainly appreciate the tips. As far as cleaning the corn before grinding, that is not a problem. Even dried beans that I buy in the grocery store, I clean before I cook.
The link to Ms. Pearl's was great also. Gave me lots of good ideas to try.

I bought a 50# bag of corn and a 50# bag of beardless whole wheat from the local feed store that bags all its own grain. Now I have some idea what to do with the corn, but I don't know where to start on the wheat.
Can anyone get me off on the right foot?

Thanks again for being so great.
mamabear

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  #11  
Old 09/19/05, 06:27 PM
 
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Just out of curiosity, I stopped at a grain elevator a couple weeks ago. I was looking for an alternative to feedstore prices and found out I could buy whole corn for $80.00/ton , $.04/lb. I was gonna run it thru my chipper to crack it, saving me about $4.00/bag. This thread got me thinking. Can I/should I get this 'field corn' and wash it, dry it grind it into cornmeal, ect fit for human consumption? Any thoughts about making this work?

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  #12  
Old 09/19/05, 06:42 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: e tn
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rat hair ????????????????

hi all i trucked corn to chi town in the 60s. they took 3 samples w/sample tube about 5 ft long x 1-1/2in if these samples had over 7 rat hairs or worse stuff shi#* total load would go as feed stuff at a much lower price. if less than 7 hairs would go as corn flakes above market price. dont know what is done now-a-days but that was yesteryear. p

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  #13  
Old 09/19/05, 07:16 PM
 
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When grinding corn for cornmeal was a normal thing, they had open polinated field corn. They didn't have hybred corn yet. The open polinated corn has a softer shell than the hybreds. We had neighbors from Kentucky. they would only raise white corn to make their meal. They refused to eat yellow corn. They said yellow corn was hog feed. About everyone took their wheat and corn to a local mill for grinding. They mills which were nearly all powered by a water wheel used a stone grinder. They also screened out the outside pieces of hull that would make the meal very coarse. Mixing some flower with the corn meal enhances the quality of the corn dodger you make. Also useing milk instead of water to make the mush that is left to set all night and served for breakfast fried does wonders for the taste.

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  #14  
Old 09/19/05, 07:19 PM
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Well the GM thing is real, the corn may not be tested for human consumption. I wouldn't be so flipant about it. Anybody remember the Starlink problems of a few years ago? What did they finally decide about the allergy causing protein in it? With the remarkably short testing the human varieties receive I'm sure not ready to trust the untested stuff!

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  #15  
Old 09/19/05, 08:11 PM
r.h. in okla.
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Didn't mean to get ya all rild up rambler. I just put that quick line about GM corn cause I'm not very educated about it. I have no ideal of why they have to genetically modify something that is already genetically modified when you compare it to what the native americans started out with. Is it not already genetically modified?

Anywho, I'm hoping to start growing big fields of the corn that Ken sent me and I hope it makes a good all around all purpose corn. When I get that accomplished the government can do what ever they want to the other corn.

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  #16  
Old 09/19/05, 09:31 PM
 
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Location: NC
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One local miller quit raising his own corn and began to buy it from a local feed mill. He claimed it was cheaper. I quit buying there because it worried me some. The only way they seprate it around here is buy moisture content and trash and weeds, etc. I don't really want to eat GM products myself. I don't like the notion of corn that a worm or a billbug can't eat without dying. That's my privilege. I still remember when a RoundUp jug gave instructions not to spray on any plants used for animal fodder. I don't think there has been enough time lasped to say what effects GM crops will have on the populace. Who knows? I do know that at one time asbesto's siding was the best thing for a house, and now local banks won't lend money for people to buy a house if it has asbestos siding on it. It may not be that dangerous,I don't know. It may just be that it lasts too long. I also know that alot of the food I buy may be made from GM products,but I don't know whether they are or not. I won't plant any though. There is aslo one more thing, most local mills used something like malathion to keep the bugs out of their grain. It might not hurt a cow or a hog, but who knows about a man.

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  #17  
Old 09/19/05, 09:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamabear
I bought a 50# bag of corn and a 50# bag of beardless whole wheat from the local feed store that bags all its own grain. Now I have some idea what to do with the corn, but I don't know where to start on the wheat.
Can anyone get me off on the right foot?

Thanks again for being so great.
mamabear
On the wheat, just grind it and use it for bread. Grind it less fine and you can cook it like cream of wheat. Just remember, it is the real thing, and will be thicker, heavier and a little harder to cook with. I finally started mixing a little white flour or some gluten powder with it or it is almost too heavy to rise (for bread that is) Another thing I have done is take the wheat kernels, soak them in a bit of water, and then get a really hot skillet, with a tad of butter, and put in the wheat. It sorta roasts and pops. Kids loved it. You have to stir it about a lot.
On the corn, dont forget that you can make tons of different breads and stuff with it. But, the feed corn doesnt do too well to just cook and eat, it isnt near as good as sweet corn. It may work to make hominy, but I never tried it.
And, when I was researching this about 6 or 7 years ago (when I started doing this same thing with the feed stuff) it seemed that the feed was just not cleaned as much as the stuff for "human" consumption. They are almost all processed with conveyors and other mechanical means.
And, just in case anyone is interested, from all I have seen/heard/read about the gm stuff,,, I wont touch it if I know that is what it is,,, wont even feed it to my animals. It just isnt right to modify stuff, it should be left in it's original form. I am not even a big fan of hybrid items.

Just my 2 cents worth.
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  #18  
Old 09/20/05, 09:44 AM
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GMO"S

The same people who would eat GM corn probably have a house full of refined white flours,Soda pop,and little debbie snacks.GMo's have already contaminated native corns in mexico,there is no way to prevent the cross polinating of other related varieties,if GMO's continue to spread all are old varieties will be contaminated and we won't have a choice.Star link was just the beginning expect far worse cases in the years ahead..

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  #19  
Old 09/20/05, 09:58 AM
dlangland
 
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Wink

Just be careful if you get it from an elevator. I had the mispleasure many yrs. ago to witness strychnine poisioning in 2 dogs, vet confirmed. Convulsions and death within minutes of returning from a trip around the rural elevator down the road.

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