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  #1  
Old 10/01/13, 08:06 PM
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Wood stoves...

What do ya'll suggest for a good wood stove? I will be heating about 1,000 sq feet with insulation BUT it is cold where I am building. And how long can you go without putting wood in and also what does EPA mean? And what should I be looking for as far as certification?

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  #2  
Old 10/01/13, 08:12 PM
 
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Environmental protection agency. You need to check because you may be in an area that has smog days so you cannot burn a wood stove on those days. Also check with your insurance company....James

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  #3  
Old 10/02/13, 01:28 AM
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You might be in an area there with red days (no burn) etc. Klamath has some serious inversion and I know they went thru a serious endeavor on getting as much smog out of the area as possible. Not sure how far north it went. At the north end of the county I'm in the air quality volunteer area, or outside of that consideration. There are low emission stoves and you would be ahead to get one. I remember going into Klamath and it was a total brown haze from poor air quality. Very stagnant air. Last winter we has an issue with county wide. So it's back on the table. Most stoves give you an estimate on what they will heat. Another thing is where you will get wood. Becoming hard to get, lots of theft etc. Forests are getting bare. Even in my rural area. Lots of folks use pellet stoves but they have their drawbacks too. Pellets sometimes are in low supply and you shouldn't use cheap ones because the glue clogs the stove and no power no stove.

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  #4  
Old 10/02/13, 02:06 AM
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I've had my eye on one of these Pot Bellied stoves on ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130806416204...84.m1423.l2649

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  #5  
Old 10/02/13, 02:24 AM
 
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I second the comment concerning firewood. If the wood isn't well seasoned and hopefully hardwood,you will be defeating the purpose. The BTU's(British Thermal Units)just won't be there and will create creosote at a much faster rate. There are many stoves that will do a good job for you,depending on price range and availability.

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  #6  
Old 10/02/13, 09:12 AM
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Echo, I asked around in that area and wood stoves are good to go. But I am also going to make sure it is EPA certified and has low emission for that reason. I started researching them last night and read about the emission and how long they burn etc. They even had catalytic vs non catalytic ones. So I plan to do some learning on all of that. Most people in CHI use wood stoves to heat from what I am understanding. My house will be just a bit over 800 sq feet with good insulation so I will also take that into consideration.

The wood over there is Ponderosa Pines and other wood. The closest location is Klamath Falls, then Chemalt, Crater Lake area.

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Old 10/02/13, 09:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MelonBar View Post
I've had my eye on one of these Pot Bellied stoves on ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/130806416204...84.m1423.l2649

I was looking into something like that last night but where do you load wood into, what part?
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  #8  
Old 10/02/13, 11:09 AM
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Probably the only place you will be able to get permits for it will the Winema and the Sun Pass State Forests. Depends on hot far you go. Ponderosa and lifeblood will be the most likely type. Juniper is there but it smells like cat pee. If you get a choice go for lifeblood over the yellow bellies. Better firewood. No hardwoods in this area or close by. I think the county has info on Woodstove
burning on their web site. I know they are beginning discussion again on broadening the air quality boundaries, you can barely use them south of you.

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  #9  
Old 10/02/13, 11:18 AM
 
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There is legislation in the works that will ban the use of, sale or resale of wood burning stoves unless they meet EPA standards. I would choose from this list:

http://www.epa.gov/compliance/resour...tifiedwood.pdf

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  #10  
Old 10/02/13, 11:37 AM
 
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The link below is for Vermont Castings, which is the stove I use in my house. They sell catalytic and non-catalytic models that meet EPA standards. Mine is catalytic, and I replaced (easily) the catalyst a couple of years ago for about a $100. When burning good, dry wood you never see smoke coming out of my chimney. It burns that cleanly/completely. Other things I like about it are the glass door (which kinda' gives you a fireplace feel), and the ash pan/compartment in the bottom of the stove, which makes ash removal very easy. My stove is going into it's 14th heating season, and I suspect I'll get at least another 10 years of service from it (if God puts up with me that long).

Good luck finding the stove that works for you.

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  #11  
Old 10/02/13, 12:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindilu View Post
I was looking into something like that last night but where do you load wood into, what part?
The top comes off or pivots to the side so you can top load, and the small door on the front also opens so you can put wood in there. I've always liked them, but we live in Missouri and that stove wouldn't heat our place. It only takes small chunks of wood, for one thing. Another thing is that when using one of those things I've had them get cherry-red hot on me, so you have to keep track of them--don't wander away and leave it.

Yet another thing--I think that price is out of line. Northern has one for four hundred.

And I think if you look around you can find a better deal. Atlanta made one for a while, now you can get them on the secondary market sometimes for three hundred or less. Be careful that the grates are still good.
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  #12  
Old 10/02/13, 12:59 PM
 
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Don't go the potbelly stove route. They are very inefficient.

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  #13  
Old 10/02/13, 04:29 PM
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For a small 1,000 sq ft house a potbelly may be all you need.

Some places have lots of regulations and inspectors, other places have none. I had never heard of needing a permit or permission, but then we do not live in an area where any permits are needed.

The EPA has had an approved list of stoves for many years.

Where I live most homes burn wood. I do not know of anyone around here who has an EPA approved stove.

My parents had a stove with a catalytic converter in the 70's. Those units were very expensive.

Green wood / seasoned wood; dry wood has 5% to 10% more Btu in it. They both give off heat and will heat your home. Green wood may give off more creosote; which depends on your stove and stove-pipe may build-up creosote. Some stoves are designed to burn creosote gasses very efficiently. Creosote build-up may be a problem if your home is poorly designed, or if you keep burnable materials too close to the stove-pipe.

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  #14  
Old 10/02/13, 04:38 PM
 
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might look at something to go outside too, have more room inside

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  #15  
Old 10/02/13, 04:56 PM
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Thank you all for the suggestions. I am researching as we speak.

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  #16  
Old 10/02/13, 10:50 PM
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This is the one I am leaning to. What do ya'll think?


http://www.landmsupply.com/departmen...tic-wood-stove

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  #17  
Old 10/03/13, 08:26 AM
 
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The specs on the stove you're looking at seem OK. There is a pedestal stove further down the page of the link you sent (the medium one) that's similar in size and cost, but it does come with a blower if that interests you. Ash pan size is important to me, the larger the better as far as I'm concerned. Some stoves you can empty the ash pan and clean some of the ash from the stove while it's still running. Many you have to let the fire die out completely to clean the ash out. Quite a pain when it's really cold out. I have a small Vermont Castings in a back bedroom and a Pioneer Maid wood cookstove in another room that can be somewhat cleaned while still fired. My third stove has to have the fire out of it to clean it. I'd like to replace it some day if I ever find any extra money. I do have one of those EPA approved stoves with the catalytic system. It does have a bypass damper around the catalyst for starting up the stove. I always had problems getting the stove to draw good and much of the time had to crack the bypass to get it to pull enough air to keep it warm enough. I also had to drill air holes in the door because it wouldn't pull enough air up through the firebricks either. It's now sitting out in the barn because it was such a pain to fool with.

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  #18  
Old 10/03/13, 08:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindilu View Post
This is the one I am leaning to. What do ya'll think?


http://www.landmsupply.com/departmen...tic-wood-stove
Very good efficiency and nice looking, but the maximum wood length is a little short - ideally you want something with more of a 20" or 21" max. I don't think a slightly larger stove would be a problem and in fact you might appreciate it when it gets really cold. But if you can live with the shorter lengths, you will be OK. Most purchased wood wood would work fine. We have a 21" inch max on our stove, and too many times my wood pieces have been just a little too long. (You should check to verify that the purchased wood in your area will work) Appears that there is no ash box (which is the case with mine), so you must remove ashes as you burn - this works fine once you get the hang of it - push embers to the sides and scoop out ashes in the morning. Also, inquire on damper - my stove has no pipe damper, but rather only a damper on air intake - again this works fine and is simpler I think.

For this type of stove, you will have to purchase wood the first year, or wait a year. You need to cut a full year ahead and split at least 6 months before using the wood. Only pieces of diameter 3" or less may be left un-split. These stoves burn efficiently, and less than dry wood just won't work. Right now I am cutting wood that I will be using a year from now.
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  #19  
Old 10/03/13, 09:49 AM
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Vermont soap stone is the next one we will get. I have and use a free standing metal stove called King. It has done well. Soap stone would hold the heat longer so I do not have to get up at 3 am to stoke the fire. We heat 1250 Sq feet.

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  #20  
Old 10/03/13, 10:26 AM
 
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You shouldn't burn pine in a stove with a catalytic converter. Too much creosote is created burning pine, and it will damage your converter. Some of the converters are also quite expensive ($300) to replace when that's needed, so that's another consideration. Had friends in Nebraska who had a pellet stove, and they hated it, but had been used to burning wood. Also, I think you MUST have electricity to use a pellet stove??? If that's true, that would cause me to decide against having one, very quickly. If the electric goes off, then you've lost the ability to heat your home and heat water, cook food, etc.

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  #21  
Old 10/03/13, 11:21 AM
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You might check in to a "site built masonry heater" (aka a rocket mass heater).
http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp

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  #22  
Old 10/03/13, 01:33 PM
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Also I've been meaning to remind you to make sure your vehicle is good to below 30 for your trips over mountain. Getting my antifreeze checked this week. And if you use your emergency brake, stop or it could freeze.

My stove is a Frontier, a real workhorse..

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  #23  
Old 10/03/13, 10:26 PM
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Oh yeah, I forgot about the antifreeze issue, I am good to go only because my sons father had me demonstrate to him I knew how to check. Uggg, that was a joke, LOL.

I have heard the EPA changed their numbers for emissions in August, does anyone know if that is correct?

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Old 10/04/13, 02:42 PM
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Was 12 degrees this morning. Nice for a few hours in the p.m. though. This weekend should nice just cold nights. October is squirrel month, you know gotta get it done. I call it also ECHO mode because it's how I feel.
Have you checked the Klamath County web site, they have a lot of good info there.

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  #25  
Old 10/04/13, 11:08 PM
 
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We had a Jotul cast iron stove a few years back. I loved that little stove. It wasn't a catalytic stove, but it did heat well and we banked it at night and still had embers in the morning so it was easy getting a new fire started.

http://jotul.com/us/products/stoves

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  #26  
Old 10/05/13, 05:02 PM
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We have a kitchen queen stove for cooking and heating. It is basically a wood destruction device. My mom would say it takes enough wood to roast an ox for frying an egg. Once it is heated up and I want to do some serious cooking, I have to open windows and doors as it gets too hot. If we were doing it again from scratch I would consider a rocket stove for heating. Especially since we are getting older and the fuel reduction is a big consideration.
http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp

I am considering a make shift one for canning outside for next year.

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  #27  
Old 10/05/13, 08:47 PM
 
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Vermont soap stone is the next one we will get. I have and use a free standing metal stove called King. It has done well. Soap stone would hold the heat longer so I do not have to get up at 3 am to stoke the fire. We heat 1250 Sq feet.
We’ve got a Hearthstone soapstone stove (Heritage model) and it’s amazing. A load burns about 8 hrs, then it radiates heat for about another 6-8. It really cuts down on wood consumption.

We heat about 1800’ upstairs, then use the geothermal fan system to move warm air downstairs.

Chuck
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  #28  
Old 10/06/13, 08:40 AM
 
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Dont want to start another thread and have a question for you experts. First winter here and this came with the house.


It is positioned nearly in the middle of the house, which is 2100sqft ranch but i only need to heat 1600 the rest is storage at far end (converted garage) no water there so no heat needed.

The stove has a blower in the back and some pipes the air comes out of, but the firebox is just a plain box nothing fancy. Is this stove worthwhile? I ave about 2cords choped up from cleaning up this summer but am wondering if it is worth making firewood for this stove or if it wont be efficent. I checked with power company (heat pump and baseboard) and the bill for prior owner went as high as 500$!!! Not sure how warm they kept it...

Downsides i work 4- 12 hours shifts (plus lunch pluss commute im gone 14-15hours) so at best i could only use at night and on off days. I do have reversable cieling fans to get the heat moving.

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Old 10/06/13, 11:20 AM
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We’ve got a Hearthstone soapstone stove (Heritage model) and it’s amazing. A load burns about 8 hrs, then it radiates heat for about another 6-8. It really cuts down on wood consumption.

We heat about 1800’ upstairs, then use the geothermal fan system to move warm air downstairs.

Chuck
Geothermal fan system, what is that?
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  #30  
Old 10/06/13, 03:53 PM
 
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Geothermal fan system, what is that?

The primary heating/cooling for our house is geothermal. One of the features is the ability to circulate air indoors from zone to zone. So we circulate warm air downstairs when burning the wood stove, or circulate cooler air upstairs when using the AC. The control unit allows you to program fan duration and power, it's kind of like putting a ceiling fan in reverse, but uses the existing ductwork.

The unit also has a filtered air exchange, which was needed due to the ICF construction being pretty air tight. When we had the woodstove installed, it required an external air intake to be able to draft correctly, again due to the ICF construction.

Chuck
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