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  #1  
Old 05/18/13, 02:13 PM
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hydraulic oil fluid spill

Our tractor sprung a very large leak while mowing. There is a trail and then a large area where it sat while I was trying to figure out what was wrong. It's all on the grass. What should I do? How harmful is it to the animals that free range the property?

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Old 05/18/13, 03:06 PM
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How harmful is it to the animals
It will probably kill the vegetation, but not affect the animals at all
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Old 05/18/13, 03:52 PM
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Thats kind of funny, I just blew a hydraulic line today myself But I wouldn't worry about the small amount you lost. Critters will leave it alone and the grass is going to die regardless.

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Old 05/18/13, 04:01 PM
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Ok thank you....2nd tractor to have issues today for us. Not happy

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Old 05/18/13, 04:21 PM
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Where you trailed it behind you as the others say grass will die but not really an issue. If you had a large amount leak in one spot you might want to dig it up and take it to your lane to spread it around. Keeps grass out of the lane and gets it out of the field. Unless it is a large area and wet an inch or so down I would just leave it.

Usually if you get it shut down quick enough you an keep from losing too much fluid.

I had the oil fill cap come loose on the mower and sprayed oil all over the back yard just a minute ago.

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Old 05/18/13, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Bearfootfarm View Post
It will probably kill the vegetation, but not affect the animals at all

It's better than roundup for killing grass
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Old 05/18/13, 05:11 PM
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If you are worried or want to convert it, get some fresh manure and put over it. Then at the end of the summer pick up the manure.
That manure will excellerate the decomposition of the hydraulic fluid and leave only a hydrocarbon spot. Which the plants will love.
Fresh horse manure works well because of the high nitrate content. Scratch it up a couple of times through the summer. In September remove most of the manure , throw a little seed in the spot and scratch it in with a rake. Next year the plants will fill in.
For many years I have been involved with reclamation of raw fuels and other petroleum base products on a large scale. To the tune of thousands of gallon spills.
If you can create the correct enviroment the little bugs (microbes) in the ground will do what they do best. That is decomposition.
This can also be done with ammonium nitrate or ammonium phosphate. Which ever is the least expensive.
If they are removing the underground fuel tanks all contaminated soil has to be removed from the ground and replaced.
The first thing that we do is take that soil to a remediation site and mix it with manure. Turn it every few weeks for about a year. Depending on the saturation rate (PPM), the time frame of decomposition will change. But it will do the job. There will be worms and bugs galore taking up residence in there in a years time.
We've even had the mushroom companies take the soil and use it in thier production. We have also had a farmer turn his hogs onto it. They are great little earth movers.
The reason that folks get so worried about fuel and oil spills is because our government has bought into someone telling them that it takes hundreds of thousands of dollars and 3 to 4 years to clean up a spill site at a fuel outlet. Don't believe them.
Sorry I got a little long winded. This subject has been a little (alot) skewed by our government and the media.
Mother nature will take care of it if she is given the correct enviroment.

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Old 05/18/13, 08:20 PM
 
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There was a spill site in Northern NM several years ago, and the trucks were being paid to haul the dirt a few hundred miles to the place is was supposed to be treated. Each truck was making a round trip in about an hour or so. I guess that spilled oil in the beds really made those trucks FLY!..............Joe

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Old 05/19/13, 06:39 AM
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Originally Posted by CIW View Post
If you are worried or want to convert it, get some fresh manure and put over it. Then at the end of the summer pick up the manure.
That manure will excellerate the decomposition of the hydraulic fluid and leave only a hydrocarbon spot. Which the plants will love.
Fresh horse manure works well because of the high nitrate content. Scratch it up a couple of times through the summer. In September remove most of the manure , throw a little seed in the spot and scratch it in with a rake. Next year the plants will fill in.
For many years I have been involved with reclamation of raw fuels and other petroleum base products on a large scale. To the tune of thousands of gallon spills.
If you can create the correct enviroment the little bugs (microbes) in the ground will do what they do best. That is decomposition.
This can also be done with ammonium nitrate or ammonium phosphate. Which ever is the least expensive.
If they are removing the underground fuel tanks all contaminated soil has to be removed from the ground and replaced.
The first thing that we do is take that soil to a remediation site and mix it with manure. Turn it every few weeks for about a year. Depending on the saturation rate (PPM), the time frame of decomposition will change. But it will do the job. There will be worms and bugs galore taking up residence in there in a years time.
We've even had the mushroom companies take the soil and use it in thier production. We have also had a farmer turn his hogs onto it. They are great little earth movers.
The reason that folks get so worried about fuel and oil spills is because our government has bought into someone telling them that it takes hundreds of thousands of dollars and 3 to 4 years to clean up a spill site at a fuel outlet. Don't believe them.
Sorry I got a little long winded. This subject has been a little (alot) skewed by our government and the media.
Mother nature will take care of it if she is given the correct enviroment.
Well I have lots of horse manure and chickens to do the scratching. Thanks!!
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  #10  
Old 10/05/13, 10:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CIW View Post
If you are worried or want to convert it, get some fresh manure and put over it. Then at the end of the summer pick up the manure.
That manure will excellerate the decomposition of the hydraulic fluid and leave only a hydrocarbon spot. Which the plants will love.
Fresh horse manure works well because of the high nitrate content. Scratch it up a couple of times through the summer. In September remove most of the manure , throw a little seed in the spot and scratch it in with a rake. Next year the plants will fill in.
For many years I have been involved with reclamation of raw fuels and other petroleum base products on a large scale. To the tune of thousands of gallon spills.
If you can create the correct enviroment the little bugs (microbes) in the ground will do what they do best. That is decomposition.
This can also be done with ammonium nitrate or ammonium phosphate. Which ever is the least expensive.
If they are removing the underground fuel tanks all contaminated soil has to be removed from the ground and replaced.
The first thing that we do is take that soil to a remediation site and mix it with manure. Turn it every few weeks for about a year. Depending on the saturation rate (PPM), the time frame of decomposition will change. But it will do the job. There will be worms and bugs galore taking up residence in there in a years time.
We've even had the mushroom companies take the soil and use it in thier production. We have also had a farmer turn his hogs onto it. They are great little earth movers.
The reason that folks get so worried about fuel and oil spills is because our government has bought into someone telling them that it takes hundreds of thousands of dollars and 3 to 4 years to clean up a spill site at a fuel outlet. Don't believe them.
Sorry I got a little long winded. This subject has been a little (alot) skewed by our government and the media.
Mother nature will take care of it if she is given the correct enviroment.
How deep would we expect the bacteria to feed on the hydraulic fluid without turning the soil? If it's in a residential area, would black plastic covering the pile be enough to conceal the odor?
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