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  #1  
Old 08/24/12, 03:11 PM
Mama MacDonald
 
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Raising fish in pool for dummies?

We just aquired an above ground pool. Well its too late to put it up to swim in. I mean why use it for only a month? So wanted to look into raising fish in it. I googled it and I didn't find good simple info. Please someone steer me in the right direction.

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  #2  
Old 08/24/12, 03:22 PM
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well what do you want to know exactly?

Its not real complicated but there are things you need to take into account.

Fish need clean water,food and oxygen.

there are various ways of going about those needs.

Nail your plan down and be a little more specific and I will happily help.

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  #3  
Old 08/24/12, 03:22 PM
 
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Go on YouTube an look up aquaponics. You will discover a wealth of information from it.

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  #4  
Old 08/24/12, 03:25 PM
Mama MacDonald
 
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Well from what I read its more than that. Ammonia levels good bacteria and all. Thats tge part thats making my head spin. I'm not interested in aquaponics. I did read the pump that comes with it only filters top of water and I need it to filter bottom water. But thats as far as I got.

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  #5  
Old 08/24/12, 03:27 PM
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I did a google using "shrimp aboveground pool" and came up with a whole bunch of info. Not quite sure what all you are looking for though. You might want to try "tilapia swimmingpool" too.

If I lived in a warmer area I would try raising prawns. (shrimp)

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  #6  
Old 08/24/12, 03:29 PM
 
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Go to pond forums. You need to cycle the pool with a strong filter. You need to do water changes as well.
Unless you will be doing daily 70% water changes or have literally one 6in fish per 500 gallons, it is critical that you cycle the pool first.
If you get freezing temps, the pool will tear. You can dig out a hole and drop the pool into it, that will help insulate.
Fish will not breed in winter and will not grow much, if at all, during winter. Most go dormant and do not eat.

Make friends with people with aquariums, ponds and/or fish forums.

What are you trying to grow in there? Where are you? What do you know about fish and aquariums/ponds?

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Last edited by secuono; 08/24/12 at 03:31 PM.
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  #7  
Old 08/24/12, 03:33 PM
Mama MacDonald
 
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I am located in Stephenville TX. Its southwest of Ft Worth. Don't know anything about it. Was thinking crappie or cat fish. I didn't see a pond forum on here. Did I miss it? Will I need a bottom filter? Or how do I fix current filter to work?

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  #8  
Old 08/24/12, 04:35 PM
 
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You will need a pump made for below water, try Terra filter. The water is then brought up so it can move through a filter of some sort. You could use a commercial filter and let it go back into the pond, or set up your own using (for instance) a water trough and lava rock, allowing it to fall into the pond. This give an area for beneficial bacteria to work on the debri, and adds air into the water. If your water does not fall below 45 degrees, the fish should continue to eat over the winter and you'll need to keep the pump going. If the top freezes over, turn off the pump.

Carp do well in containment, which is why you see goldfish and koi in little backyard ponds.

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  #9  
Old 08/24/12, 08:44 PM
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umm first make sure you do not need a permit for the fish.

Possession of game fish is regulated.

the ammonia relates to clean water. Honestly, the Aquaponics is your best bet for removal vs cost and return.

the pump on a pool is not sufficient.

Of coarse a lot of this figures on population density, a few fish. the ammonia can be dissipated through a bubbler.

Like I asked earlier what are you shooting for? spell it out. I can raise fish in a gold fish bowl or a beta tank with regular water changes. no pump or anything fancy. but when you get into the 2000 gallon mark that's not economically feasible.

basically your best bet is a swirl filter, larger the diameter the better. larger the slower the swirl the faster it settles out suspended waste. normally you can blow it out with head pressure by flipping a valve. the swirl prevents you clogging and poisoning your Biological filter. the biological filter hosts a good bacteria colony that converts ammonia to nitrites and nitrates (needs good Oxygen levels). You can use other filters to 1.remove the ammonia 2. remove the nitrites and nitrates. 3. let the plants remove the nitrites and nitrates.

Least expensive and best choice 3.

This is the clean water part.

temp factors feeding.

oxygen also plays a role.

And that can be provide a number of ways.

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  #10  
Old 08/25/12, 07:09 AM
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Im not going to fully explain my set up because I hope to take it commercial one day... i can get commercial level production from a set up with a fraction of the costs and infrastructure. Im sure most voiced in the topic will tell me Im wrong, as a current debate in PMs I am having with a member here is going. not trying to prove it to anyone of course. Otherwise i wouldnt be able to take my work commercial when im financially able to later. That said... heres what i do minus some of the "tricks" that make it work.

I dont bother with filtering at all. Takes up to much effort, infrastructure and the rest. I let it all settle, and clean my tanks once a year. (you must clean it yearly to break any potential disease cycles) This does take some oxygen as someone is sure to point out, but providing good aeration can more then make up for it.

I rely on growing duckweed, floating algae and greenwater algae as my biological filter. (greenwater in the same tank, the others in different tanks, i also grow lots of daphnia) Unlike land based plants you bypass needing to turn the ammonia into nitrates and nitrites.

Most people will tel you, you still need to pull out the accumulating fish wastes, but Ive found no need, (Ive trialed just about every type of filtration and configuration there of) providing good aeration more then accounts for the oxygen loss on not doing so, and is much much easier to deal with, cheaper also. I also do not add outside foods to the system, (besides insects that show up on their own) the fish eat only those foods i grow from their own wastes. I have good growth and healthy fish, and very low ammonia levels. Done well such a set up can rival high en commercial set ups, at a fraction of the input costs. Im sure someone will tell me Im wrong, I dont care to prove it. Flame away if you want to. It took me over a decade to perfect all this. But even with what I just shared and some basic understanding you can do pretty well, and cheap.

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  #11  
Old 08/25/12, 07:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danaus29 View Post
I did a google using "shrimp aboveground pool" and came up with a whole bunch of info. Not quite sure what all you are looking for though. You might want to try "tilapia swimmingpool" too.

If I lived in a warmer area I would try raising prawns. (shrimp)
Ohio has some freshwater prawn farms using outdoor ponds.

A good source of info are the "RAC's" Try SRAC (southern regional aquaculture center).
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  #12  
Old 08/25/12, 08:31 PM
 
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RAISING CATFISH IN A BARREL

Raising Catfish in a Barrel

videos:

How To Build a Backyard Fish Farm








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  #13  
Old 08/25/12, 08:50 PM
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don't see why you couldn't use a large pond as in koi, water pump to bring the water up from the bottom and use it to run the water thru a filter. Maybe a fifty gallon barrle set up above the pool and run the water in it,fill barrel with some sort of gravel and maybe a mesh or screen type filter,and as the water runs out the bottom of the barrel fix it so it splashes down into the pool,thus creating oxygen in the water,crude but you get the ideasl maybe, might work,will always think it should have !lol good luck,don't give up,keep us informed.

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  #14  
Old 08/26/12, 02:05 PM
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Thanks fishhead. It's an idea we've been kicking around. Glad to know it can be done in Ohio.

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  #15  
Old 08/26/12, 02:19 PM
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It can be done anywhere Danus.

The Growing season may need to be extended though.

As Far as I know Indiana and Ohio are at the farthest range that you can get a crop in before the weather breaks. that is with out heating the water or having under glass.

Shrimp yields from most farms seems pretty low though.
If I remember right 700lb average per acre.
I do think I seen 1000 lb per but that does not seem the norm.

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  #16  
Old 08/26/12, 03:10 PM
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Now for the hard part, buying the land on which to raise them. Much as I would love to eat 700 lbs of shrimp a year I don't have enough land to put that size of pond in.

I wonder how many pounds you could raise in a hot tub.

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  #17  
Old 08/26/12, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danaus29 View Post
Now for the hard part, buying the land on which to raise them. Much as I would love to eat 700 lbs of shrimp a year I don't have enough land to put that size of pond in.

I wonder how many pounds you could raise in a hot tub.
well here how I'm looking at it, everyone who raises them has to buy the starts. perhaps you become a breeder?

To me that is a very low return, and looking through the numbers most are lucky to break even.

Isn't that farming though, wait your suppose to loose money...

though most I think are approaching it in a very haphazard manor and really think they can improve their systems for better yields.

think poly culture. perhaps blended with aquaponics.

there are a few facility's here listed as raising shrimp.
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  #18  
Old 08/26/12, 05:39 PM
 
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go get a book called Small Scale Aquaculture by Van Gorder. It has everything you need to know, from using pools to make a simple filter and aeration system, to selecting a species of fish based on your local climate. He details methods for increasing the growing season, too, like simple greenhouse covers for your pool.

Another system that is good for pools like this is a tilapia/greenwater system. Here's a thread with all the info you ever need:
Greenwater Aquaculture

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  #19  
Old 08/26/12, 06:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ||Downhome|| View Post
It can be done anywhere Danus.

Shrimp yields from most farms seems pretty low though.
If I remember right 700lb average per acre.
I do think I seen 1000 lb per but that does not seem the norm.
I just looked into it briefly. Freshwater shrimp eat each other if they don't have huge amounts of space. Since land cost is an issue, not a lot of areas are available to grow freshwater shrimp with enough inexpensive land, the right temperatures, and sufficient cheap water available.

I sure do like to eat shrimp, though, so still considering it.
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  #20  
Old 08/26/12, 07:20 PM
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Downhome, not supposed to lose money. Although it happens that way all too often.

I would be happy to raise 10 pounds a year. Don't think that will happen in a hot tub though.

Another product that, if you shop sales, can be had relatively cheaply. At $7/lb, cleaned and pre-cooked, it would take a lot of shrimp to make up the difference.

One site I was reading on said you can either screen them off into sections (but they didn't say how) or keep the water too turbulent to allow them to move freely which prevents them from hunting each other.

Crawdads would probably be better for small scale aquaponics.

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