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  #1  
Old 01/13/12, 04:07 PM
 
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Location: Dawsonville. ga
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fencing through a wooded area

I want to fence in the back 2-3 acres on my property and half is open "potential" pasture, and the other half is a rather steep wooded hill. It has a small walking traill cut around the property. It is a bit too steep for a tractor(which I don't own) and I figured the roots would impose an endless problem with a posthole digger. Is there a correct way to nail a fence to a tree? Possibly put a 2x4 inbetween the tree and the goat wire.

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  #2  
Old 01/13/12, 04:22 PM
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We fence using the trees and boulders. They make excellent posts. I set long eyebolts in the trees. Threes grow out about 1/16" to 1/4" a year. Set the bolts to line up with the forces. You can unspin the bolts as time passes and the tree grows. These are the end points and anchors. Then we use step in posts between them. Works great and the trees are fine.

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  #3  
Old 01/13/12, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlands View Post
We fence using the trees and boulders. They make excellent posts. I set long eyebolts in the trees. Threes grow out about 1/16" to 1/4" a year. Set the bolts to line up with the forces. You can unspin the bolts as time passes and the tree grows. These are the end points and anchors. Then we use step in posts between them. Works great and the trees are fine.

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-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
Read about our on-farm butcher shop project:
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http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa
Good idea on the eyebolts.
Never thought of that.
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  #4  
Old 01/13/12, 04:57 PM
JIL JIL is offline
 
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I had someone tell me that I shouldn't use tress as when the tree grows it will lift the fence , but it seems to me once a tree is out of the ground it grows outward and from the top. what is the correct thought on this?

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  #5  
Old 01/13/12, 05:01 PM
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Trees don't lift wire. I have never seen any wire in trees at heights other than that used for fencing. I have seen lots of trees with wire thought the middle of the tree at the proper height for a fence.

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  #6  
Old 01/13/12, 05:05 PM
 
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Only trouble we have had using trees is that over time, the tree incorporates the wire within itself, so that you get a wire 3 inches INSIDE of the tree. And this can make repairs difficult. Maybe some tree types do not do this??? And it is not that big a deal, you can still splice wire, etc. Also, I have had the trees holding the wire fall down, kinda wrecking the fence. I was raised NOT to use trees, but I do not really know why. LOL

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  #7  
Old 01/13/12, 05:11 PM
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thanks that was what I thought it didn't make sence to me that it would lift the wire. all the trees with fence that I have seen the tree grows and the wire ends up inside the bark or deeper depending on time and tree.

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  #8  
Old 01/13/12, 06:10 PM
Brenda Groth
 
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there is ancient barbed wire fences fastened with staples to some of our trees in our old backwoods, so I guess that works fine..

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  #9  
Old 01/13/12, 06:33 PM
 
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Location: Dawsonville. ga
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My concern is that long after I'm gone someone will cut that tree down with a chainsaw. And now they will hit a possibly hidden piece of fence embedded in the tree. That's why I mentioned a 2x4 on the face of the tree. It wouldnt as easy embedd the 2x4 as it would a wire. Also repairs would be possible.

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  #10  
Old 01/13/12, 07:18 PM
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Grandpa used to do this all the time. Found one yesterday with the chainsaw. Saved him some time and money I guess. Me not so much.

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  #11  
Old 01/13/12, 08:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaleK View Post
Grandpa used to do this all the time. Found one yesterday with the chainsaw. Saved him some time and money I guess. Me not so much.

Yeah, My Grandpa and then my Dad did the same thing. I've messed up a lot of saw chains finding parts of old fences the hard way.
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  #12  
Old 01/13/12, 09:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shdybrady View Post
I want to fence in the back 2-3 acres on my property and half is open "potential" pasture, and the other half is a rather steep wooded hill. It has a small walking traill cut around the property. It is a bit too steep for a tractor(which I don't own) and I figured the roots would impose an endless problem with a posthole digger. Is there a correct way to nail a fence to a tree? Possibly put a 2x4 inbetween the tree and the goat wire.
.................Something you might try .........Use a Hammer drill with a concrete bit , find a boulder that is somewhat aligned with your fence row , and see IF you can drill a hole into the rock , IF yes , then you can drive a concrete bolt into the hole and maybe try to set 2 bolts maybe 2 feet a part . Then , you could weld a T post to the edge of the lag bolts . Then , just attach your wire across the face of the Tpost just like it had been driven into the ground . A concrete bit probably won't work on granite or any really hard rock , but it might work on sandstone or some variety of softer rock . , fordy
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  #13  
Old 01/13/12, 09:57 PM
 
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I think what highlands meant was that by using the eyebolts, you can screw them out of the tree as necessary so they won't be enveloped by the tree as it grows in girth. I've ruined more saws hitting bullets than fencing.

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  #14  
Old 01/14/12, 07:59 AM
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Sawmill operators aren't real fond of people attaching anything metal to a tree....

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  #15  
Old 01/14/12, 08:07 AM
 
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Always nailed to the tree and motored on...if cutting timber on an old fence line, make your intial cut as low as possible and then jump the butt six feet...should avoid most fence staples.

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  #16  
Old 01/14/12, 08:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlands View Post
We fence using the trees and boulders. They make excellent posts. I set long eyebolts in the trees. Threes grow out about 1/16" to 1/4" a year. Set the bolts to line up with the forces. You can unspin the bolts as time passes and the tree grows. These are the end points and anchors. Then we use step in posts between them. Works great and the trees are fine.

Cheers

-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
Read about our on-farm butcher shop project:
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/butchershop
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa
Great idea...

I assume you use an insulated eye (where do you find that??) when a wire is hot??

Thanks
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  #17  
Old 01/14/12, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
I assume you use an insulated eye (where do you find that??) when a wire is hot??

Google "screw in fence insulator" and you'll see several designs.

You can also use standard insulators and put them up with screws instead of nails
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  #18  
Old 01/14/12, 08:50 AM
 
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If I am called upon to cut a large tree, I always check it with a metal detector before I start a saw. Most sawmills around these parts scan each incoming log with a hand wand before they hit it with a blade.
@Fordy- good tip about rock. I recall seeing a fence set in a granite bluff. Looked like the builder used a rock hammer or air drill and bored into the rock, cut the spade off the t post and cemented the posts into the hole with mortar. Was quite a site and all I could do was admire the effort someone went through all those years ago. Posts and wire were heavily rusted but the posts couldn't be moved or wiggled at all.

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  #19  
Old 01/14/12, 09:53 AM
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Just nail a 2X4 to the tree it will keep Tree from growing around the wire.

You were talking about digging Post Holes in 50 years put in alot of Fence with digging very few Post Holes.Just put T Post in or punch Hole with Rock Bar and Drive Wood Post in with Maul.Only Holes you may have to dig is corners and few along the Line.

big rockpile

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  #20  
Old 01/14/12, 11:10 AM
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When we first got on our place we were quite ignorant as to how to treat trees and put up fencing; thus, we used 16p nails and connected the woven fencing to any trees we needed to. Here it is 13 yrs later and the trees show no sign of disease, though some have grown over the nails.

We recently run a woven 48" fence through a corner of our property that contained briars, trenches and trees. We used the 8 ft long, heavy-duty metal posts for this. Where the woven wire met the trees, we slipped a 3-strand wire through pieces of water hose and use that hose to wrap around the tree to anchor the fencing onto different branches or wherever we could.

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  #21  
Old 01/14/12, 06:38 PM
 
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I've always taken my chainsaw and removed a line of trees along the property line. Then the fence gets built with fence posts and then I can easily get to the fence to keep it inspected and in good repair.

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  #22  
Old 01/14/12, 07:58 PM
Brenda Groth
 
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a bright colored wire insulator would be seen by anyone wielding a chainsaw if that is a concern.

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  #23  
Old 01/15/12, 07:57 AM
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Around here,they use a treated 2x4 attached to a tree then wire on the 2x4---guess there are lots of ways-just figure out what will work for you--

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  #24  
Old 01/15/12, 09:47 AM
 
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I have talked bad about a lot of people I do not even know, that attached fence to trees some where in the past. Somehow my chainsaw can find it. LOL

If it is on a property line, talk to the neighbor about removing the tree. If it is not on the property line, then fence around it. JMHO

SPIKE

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  #25  
Old 01/15/12, 09:49 AM
 
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My worry is not the trees.. There is a nice 3 foot walking trail cut around the property. Its the roots I'm worry about digging through

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  #26  
Old 01/15/12, 03:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokeEater2 View Post
Yeah, My Grandpa and then my Dad did the same thing. I've messed up a lot of saw chains finding parts of old fences the hard way.
Most folks early in their chainsaw careers get 'learned' about old fences. Some learn their lesson, and figure out where the old fences or possible fences were, and avoid cutting those trees "down low"... and some folks don't learn, and keep doing it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly View Post
Always nailed to the tree and motored on...if cutting timber on an old fence line, make your intial cut as low as possible and then jump the butt six feet...should avoid most fence staples.
At least six foot, and even then you can end up with nails/whatnot up higher, where someone mighta posted a 'no trespassing' sign...

Quote:
Originally Posted by shdybrady View Post
My worry is not the trees.. There is a nice 3 foot walking trail cut around the property. Its the roots I'm worry about digging through
T-posts will go thru roots, unless their monster hard... if it is a problem, just do what you'd do with a regular post... move over a foot or so, to get out of the way. If I hit a big root, while post hole digging, unless it's a corner post, or a foundation set, I move over a bit, and try it again.

You can nail into oaks... pine trees? not so much... as they are wimpy when it comes to nails, and this allows pine beetles and other critters a chance to enter the tree. One side of my place is fenced with barb wire and netwire, nailed into trees and post oak split posts... solid as ever. You can stand on the wire between the trees...
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  #27  
Old 01/16/12, 07:17 PM
 
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I used poly rope to tie my electric fence to trees. I used a ceramic insulator, but I'm not sure it was needed. The poly doesn't conduct or hold much water.

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