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View Poll Results: Which Way is Up?
I like the reduced End Up 8 13.33%
I like the reduced Down 44 73.33%
Neither 2 3.33%
HUH? 6 10.00%
Voters: 60. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 03/13/11, 06:57 PM
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Which Way Do You Run Your Stove Pipe and Why?

Ok Do you like the reduced end up or Down?

WHY?

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  #2  
Old 03/13/11, 07:00 PM
 
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Smoke rises. With the reduced end up smoke cannot escape by going under the edge of the mating pipe. Of course when there is a draft problem it can still escape.

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  #3  
Old 03/13/11, 07:05 PM
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Creosote stays inside the pipe if the reduced end is down.

Kathie

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  #4  
Old 03/13/11, 07:08 PM
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reduced end down as littlebit said!

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  #5  
Old 03/13/11, 07:29 PM
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I had my stove inspected last year and had to flip my piping. Inspector said the easy way to know is, if you'd pour water down the chimney from the roof, it wouldn't come in thru the joints. First I ever heard of that.

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  #6  
Old 03/13/11, 07:36 PM
 
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Reduced end of the pipe faces down. You do this for the creosote running down the pipe staying in the pipe just like water.

http://www.ehow.com/way_5814063_wood...tallation.html

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  #7  
Old 03/13/11, 07:53 PM
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The reduced end was down, because that is the way it fit in the woodstove. About halfway up there is a slider pipe that is used to connect the single pipe through the ceiling jack, then out to the roof. This slider pipe makes it easy to assemble and clean.

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  #8  
Old 03/13/11, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis in Louisiana View Post
The reduced end was down, because that is the way it fit in the woodstove.
Yep, thats the long and the short of it. If I just had to have it the other way, would have to crip the non-reduced end so first section would be reduced on both ends. I have seen stoves though where you need the non-reduced end to fit over the flange. If everything works as its supposed to, then doesnt really matter. There should be enough draw to take smoke up and out without dripping creosote either way. If you are dripping significant creosote, then you are burning too green wood.
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  #9  
Old 03/13/11, 09:03 PM
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The crimped edge goes down. There is no "like" about it.

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  #10  
Old 03/13/11, 09:16 PM
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Crimped end goes down so the cresote stays inside the pipe, as others have said. Cover the outside of the joint with high temp silicon caulk if you are worried about smoke escaping.

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  #11  
Old 03/13/11, 09:44 PM
 
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Male end down, also known as the reduced or crimped end.
No stinking creoste drips or obnoxious smell.

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  #12  
Old 03/13/11, 11:24 PM
 
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with male end down it is recommended to coat the connection with high temp sealer or make sure you have a pair of good fitting pipe so smoke or exhaust can not escape around the connection. With male end up you have a funnel effect of the lower pipe feeding to the inside of the upper pipe and no exhaust leak. Have installed stoves that start with a male end at stove and instructions state to install with male ends feeding up, and have seen stoves the opposite way also. Fire Marshel here likes them male feeding up into female so sparks & fumes cannot escape. Local stove store tells everybody to do it opposite so cresote dosn't run to outside of pipe. If I was careless enough and had to worry about cresote running down a stove pipe I won't burn wood, that much cresote and not useing a chimney spark arrester with a cap to prevent rain entry, the person deserves to have there house burned out from under them. !!!!

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  #13  
Old 03/14/11, 02:47 AM
 
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Assuming a drawing wood stove or wood boiler, the correct way is with the crimped end down. As the chmney cools it will condense some moisture, and if you assemble the other way your joints will leak black goo out each joint, even if you are so perfect you don't think you will ever make any creosote.

A properly drawing chinmey will have a slight natural vaccum and so will not leak smoke out the joints, at least not after a very brief warmup.

I don't know much about powered exhausts (pellet stoves or some exotic wood stoves), or if you were talking about lp/ natural gas devices, etc - that would be a whole different deal.

--->Paul

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  #14  
Old 03/14/11, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by littlebitfarm View Post
Creosote stays inside the pipe if the reduced end is down.

Kathie
Ditto
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  #15  
Old 03/14/11, 11:00 AM
 
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I second

Quote:
Originally Posted by VaFarmer View Post
with male end down it is recommended to coat the connection with high temp sealer or make sure you have a pair of good fitting pipe so smoke or exhaust can not escape around the connection. With male end up you have a funnel effect of the lower pipe feeding to the inside of the upper pipe and no exhaust leak. Have installed stoves that start with a male end at stove and instructions state to install with male ends feeding up, and have seen stoves the opposite way also. Fire Marshel here likes them male feeding up into female so sparks & fumes cannot escape. Local stove store tells everybody to do it opposite so cresote dosn't run to outside of pipe. If I was careless enough and had to worry about cresote running down a stove pipe I won't burn wood, that much cresote and not useing a chimney spark arrester with a cap to prevent rain entry, the person deserves to have there house burned out from under them. !!!!
Whut 'e said!
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  #16  
Old 03/14/11, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by 7thswan View Post
The crimped edge goes down. There is no "like" about it.
You apparently have never tried to use some of old "antique" stoves that I have. Some were designed where the crimped end simply doesnt fit the flange, but the non-crimped end does. Now not arguing the best way to go in such a situation is to simply cut the crimped part off so you have first section of stove pipe with no crimped end. But the manufacturer of the stove must have intended that stove pipe was installed opposite of what you think is an absolute rule.

And again if your wood is well cured and you burn a hot fire, there simply isnt that much creosote to ever cause a problem. If you have creosote running down pipe no matter how you install it, then you are burning too green wood or have stove set to burn too low or both.
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  #17  
Old 03/14/11, 12:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by littlebitfarm View Post
Creosote stays inside the pipe if the reduced end is down.

Kathie
Yep! Another vote for this way.
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  #18  
Old 03/14/11, 01:02 PM
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I'm a reduced end down sorta guy myself but was stunned that the Vozelgang stove kit I bought wont work that way it needs the big end down.
I thought maybe it was just me.
But apparently the folks at Vozelgang don't actually USE their product?

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  #19  
Old 03/14/11, 01:21 PM
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I believe what you need is a stovetop adapter like this one

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  #20  
Old 03/14/11, 01:43 PM
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Id thought about cutting the reduced end off of one section of pipe. Wont that give me the same result?
The reason that I haven't though is like with a adapter I'm still going to have the same result creosote on the outside of the stove..

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  #21  
Old 03/14/11, 01:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fantasymaker View Post
Id thought about cutting the reduced end off of one section of pipe. Wont that give me the same result?
The reason that I haven't though is like with a adapter I'm still going to have the same result creosote on the outside of the stove..
If you look closely, the adapter has an internal crimped collar - or skirt - that fits into the stove opening so any dripping cresote or water drips into the firebox.
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  #22  
Old 03/14/11, 03:41 PM
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WOW JUST WHAT I NEED!
Now all I gotta do is find one!

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  #23  
Old 03/14/11, 03:45 PM
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WOW JUST WHAT I NEED!
Now all I gotta do is find one!
I've ordered stove parts from www.northlineexpress.com
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  #24  
Old 03/14/11, 03:50 PM
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this questions sort of like which way do you like to run your shingles, lap toward ridge or lap toward eve...

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  #25  
Old 03/14/11, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by HermitJohn View Post
You apparently have never tried to use some of old "antique" stoves that I have. Some were designed where the crimped end simply doesnt fit the flange, but the non-crimped end does. Now not arguing the best way to go in such a situation is to simply cut the crimped part off so you have first section of stove pipe with no crimped end. But the manufacturer of the stove must have intended that stove pipe was installed opposite of what you think is an absolute rule.

And again if your wood is well cured and you burn a hot fire, there simply isnt that much creosote to ever cause a problem. If you have creosote running down pipe no matter how you install it, then you are burning too green wood or have stove set to burn too low or both.
I have 3 Antique stoves, the crimped end has to be cut off right above the ridge. Then it will fit over the cast flange. Then one can still have their pipe going the correct way.
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Old 03/14/11, 04:08 PM
 
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Another thread in which I know learned something and understand it that will matter. I love HT. Worthy of challenging a college education ---Free and practical.

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  #27  
Old 03/14/11, 04:11 PM
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Well if you're venting an oil furnace you run crimped end up, but all wood fired stoves and furnaces run crimped end down. Even wod/oil furnaces, wood takes priority crimped down.

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  #28  
Old 03/14/11, 07:05 PM
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Originally Posted by 7thswan View Post
I have 3 Antique stoves, the crimped end has to be cut off right above the ridge. Then it will fit over the cast flange. Then one can still have their pipe going the correct way.
Not at the antique stoves flange it wont be the politically correct way.... Think of all that creosote from burning green wood oozing down the back of your nice antique stove....
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Old 03/14/11, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Hermit John View Post
Not at the antique stoves flange it wont be the politically correct way.... Think of all that creosote from burning green wood oozing down the back of your nice antique stove....
If one were to measure a flange on an old stove you would find that there is not any pipe (for wood) made today that would fit on the inside of a flange -unless you would like to re-crimp or cut to otherwise fit the pipe inside.Take a good look at an old flange and the pipe is Not meant to fit inside. Who would burn green wood, unless they are partial to flue fires while trying to heat ones home during -15 weather or canning on the cook stove.Which as we all know is near impossible with Green Wood. If I were going to make a guess at where the best place for creating a stinking mess with Green Wood,it would be in my greenhouse where I turn it down for long periods of time-you, know while I get some Sleep. But then again, I don't burn Green Wood.
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  #30  
Old 03/15/11, 03:04 PM
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I would note that the old antique stoves were impossible to close down for the slow burn that todays more efficient air tights are designed for. Hence the flanges on the antiques were set up for the pipe to run crimped end up. Creosote just wasnt the issue it is with the modern stoves. I am soooooo glad I no longer have to deal with wood for heat or cooking!!

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