Fasten 8' 2x4 to Slab - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 01/30/11, 02:40 PM
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Fasten 8' 2x4 to Slab

I need to fasten a 2x4 to a slab. The slab is probably about 40 years old and sits in the open. I tried using cut nails but the concrete just crumbled. My battery powered drill isn't powerful enough to drill into the slab with a masonry bit. The slab is at least 200' from the nearest power outlet.

So how can I fasten the 2x4? The slab is 8' wide and I just want a 2x4 across the width. This is for the end wall of a PVC pipe greenhouse. Can I glue it?

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Old 01/30/11, 02:50 PM
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The only way we have done it is to drill and put anchor bolts in. I don't think glue will work. Can you borrow enough elec cords for a powered drill?

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Old 01/30/11, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Callieslamb View Post
The only way we have done it is to drill and put anchor bolts in. I don't think glue will work. Can you borrow enough elec cords for a powered drill?
Ditto.
A hammer drill and a good concrete bit should make quick work of it. Just get a couple of cords.
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Old 01/30/11, 03:12 PM
 
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a good brand of construction adheasive will work. PL2000 can be bought at most harware stores. It come in a tube for a caulking gun. I have use this method many times with good results. Just make sure the slab and the 2x4 are dry. A good bead along the entire lenght and it will never come back off.

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Old 01/30/11, 03:29 PM
 
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How about a Powder Actuated Driver, Hammer, like the one from Grainger in the address below. I have a similiar one and it works pretty well for the occasional project. You should be able to find them in a local store the big box stores carry them Just be careful and hit the top squarely.

Jim




http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/RAM...4&ci_sku=2HNW4

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  #6  
Old 01/30/11, 03:33 PM
 
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The way I've fastened wood to concrete is with the special tool that drives the nail in with a .22 cartridge. Sorry, I don't know what the tool is called, but a rental yard will have one.

Another possibility is to frame the slab in and then fasten to the frame. Put your pressure treated wood around the outside of the slab and hold it in place with stakes.

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Old 01/30/11, 03:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kickford View Post
a good brand of construction adheasive will work. PL2000 can be bought at most harware stores. It come in a tube for a caulking gun. I have use this method many times with good results. Just make sure the slab and the 2x4 are dry. A good bead along the entire lenght and it will never come back off.
Construction adhesive is a bit of an interesting product. It cannot be used in any manner to substitute for other fasteners in a code approved application. There are many reasons, including the fact that it is often applied under less than ideal conditions, or exactly as the manufacturer directs. It bonds poorly to many common surfaces from wet lumber to many plastics, and the fact that it "creeps" under load. It will literally stretch and slide under continuous loading. It is most commonly used in residential applications for subfloor and sheetrock applications, where it is secondary to mechanical fasteners, such as nails and screws.
In my experience, attempting to glue lumber to an old concrete slab is pretty much a waste of time. In this case, a Powder Actuated fastener, like a Hilti or Ram-Set anchor will also have a pretty poor success rate. Old concrete is typically hard and quite brittle. Shot pins tend to typically blow out large portions of the surface, and not do much else.
I would gather a few HD extension cords, a quality hammer drill, the correct bit and a few 1/4" x 4" Tapcons. Anything else can be a frustrating waste of time.
If you really want to give it one last shot without a drill, try this. Buy 2-1/2" fluted concrete nails. Pre-drill the board every 12" or so, and start the nails. Now kneel on the board, and put as much weight as you can on it, as close to the nail as possible. Drive the nail with a short, three pound sledge. you may get enough of them to hold to call it a success. Longer nails are counter-productive, and the big "lump hammer" is a must. Good luck.
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Old 01/30/11, 03:52 PM
 
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Old school Answer...

Back in the day.....we would use a "star drill" and a 3 or 4# short-handled driller's hammer. And, you hold the star drill with one hand & hit it with the other hand, very carefully. And if you hit the drill each time you drill a hole, where you need it. Kinda slowly, though.
But if you miss one time and hit the side of your hand, you get at least a very bad bruise. Oh, and star drills come in a few different sizes for the size of the bolt you need.
I have a couple of old driller's hammers and an old star drill or two laying in a tool box here somewhere. And....They don't need an electric cord.
ETA.......You put in 2 or 3 holes, put in bolts & anchors & there you are.
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Last edited by Old John; 01/30/11 at 03:54 PM. Reason: ETA.........
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  #9  
Old 01/30/11, 04:00 PM
 
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Dig a hole in the ground against the side of the slab where you wand the 2X4 and put post in the ground. I would use a treated 2X6 and lay it on its side. Also will water be laying against it after a rain? Good luck with your project. Sam

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  #10  
Old 01/30/11, 04:06 PM
 
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You could get an inverter to hook to your car battery and run a heavy drill right at the slab. But the Ram set is more fun. Carpentry and gunfire go together so well.

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  #11  
Old 01/30/11, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by tamsam View Post
Dig a hole in the ground against the side of the slab where you wand the 2X4 and put post in the ground. I would use a treated 2X6 and lay it on its side. Also will water be laying against it after a rain? Good luck with your project. Sam
I was thinking about doing it that way. Would make it easy to remove if I ever needed to.

I do have an inverter still in the box. Bought a solar panel and inverter but haven't got around to hooking it up yet. As soon as I get another nice day I will try the inverter and hammer drill.
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Last edited by MoonRiver; 01/30/11 at 04:42 PM.
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  #12  
Old 01/30/11, 07:27 PM
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Why not borrow or rent a generator to run a power drill and any other electrical tools.?

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  #13  
Old 01/30/11, 07:37 PM
 
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a star drill will do it fairly quickly job, just keep the star drill turning, (about 1/8 of a turn) on each blow,

drop in a expanding anchor bolt and bolt it down,

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  #14  
Old 01/30/11, 07:43 PM
 
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I've used one of those fasteners that shoots uses a 22cal charge.
It shoots a nail through the 2x4 into the concrete.
You hit it with a hammer, and it fires the fastener through the
wood into the concrete.

If you do manage to drill the concrete, hilti makes all kinds of
fasteners for that purpose.

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  #15  
Old 01/30/11, 10:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by champ7ac View Post
I've used one of those fasteners that shoots uses a 22cal charge.
It shoots a nail through the 2x4 into the concrete.
You hit it with a hammer, and it fires the fastener through the
wood into the concrete.

If you do manage to drill the concrete, hilti makes all kinds of
fasteners for that purpose.
The device is called a Hilti gun. A lot of tool rental places have them.
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  #16  
Old 01/31/11, 01:13 AM
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My 22 powered nailer is a Remington brand. When I used it on old concrete it just shattered the concrete, didn't really nail the board down. Your best bet is to power a hammer drill from a generator or inverter and drill holes with a masonary bit. Use compressed air to blow the dust out of the holes and an expanding deal to bolt the 2X4 down. You could also glue the bolts in with epoxy. I did this to hold down 2 picnic tables and it worked fine.

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  #17  
Old 01/31/11, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Old John View Post
Old school Answer...

Back in the day.....we would use a "star drill" and a 3 or 4# short-handled driller's hammer. And, you hold the star drill with one hand & hit it with the other hand, very carefully. And if you hit the drill each time you drill a hole, where you need it. Kinda slowly, though.
But if you miss one time and hit the side of your hand, you get at least a very bad bruise. Oh, and star drills come in a few different sizes for the size of the bolt you need.
I have a couple of old driller's hammers and an old star drill or two laying in a tool box here somewhere. And....They don't need an electric cord.
ETA.......You put in 2 or 3 holes, put in bolts & anchors & there you are.
Talk about a flashback! I haven't seen a star pit in decades and I don't even want to think about how much pain I'd be in after having to drill more than one hole with one today. What's even more 'fun' is to be doing a big hole and having to hold the bit for someone you don't really know to hit with a 8# hammer.
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  #18  
Old 01/31/11, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by MoonRiver View Post
I was thinking about doing it that way. Would make it easy to remove if I ever needed to.

I do have an inverter still in the box. Bought a solar panel and inverter but haven't got around to hooking it up yet. As soon as I get another nice day I will try the inverter and hammer drill.
It takes a fair sized inverter to run a drill under load, BTDT.

FYI, you can buy a power nailer which uses .22 blanks to shoot special nails at any hardware store. They aren't that expensive.
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Last edited by watcher; 01/31/11 at 10:12 AM.
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  #19  
Old 01/31/11, 11:39 AM
 
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I'd be asking friends and neighbors if anyone had a generator I could borrow.... A generator AND a hammer drill would be even better. By the way, if you do end up having to buy something- no homesteader should be without a generator....

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  #20  
Old 01/31/11, 12:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Old John View Post
Back in the day.....we would use a "star drill" ...
Great answer. in the time it takes to read all these post the first hole could have been done.

at an auction once looking at a... maybe 1.25" dia. star drill that was 3' long a dude asked what is it and I guessed a drill for dynamite. i should have bought it... you never know.
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