help my roof is leaking - Homesteading Today
Homesteading Today

Go Back   Homesteading Today > General Homesteading Forums > Homesteading Questions


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 12/22/10, 09:06 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: extreme NE TN
Posts: 912
help my roof is leaking

I had an addition built about three years ago.They tied in to the existing roof which was shingles.Well apparently there is now what is called a "dead spot".Possibly meaning where water pools?I tried dealing with the contractor.No go.There were no building permits in this county then.The only reason I chose the guy was because he had done some work on my parents place and did a good job.We were new to this area.After he built my addition and there is so many mistakes,I`ve heard others talk about his shoddy work.
The roof only leaked if ice or snow is on it and then it rains.Then it is a steady drip.
Ok so I call another contractor to install a metal roof.They agreed that yes there is a dead spot and that the metal roof will take care of any leaks.Well a few months after they were done we had snow then rain.My roof was leaking!!!I called the contractor and he came right out.They tried to patch it using some kind of silicone I`m not really sure.It seemed to work,although we didn`t have any ice/snow and then rain events.We just had a lot of snow and cold temps last winter.
So that brings us up to now.Two days ago snow on the roof for several days and then we get rain,quite a bit of rain.And I hear drip drip drip.It was coming in pretty steady.This is so depressing.I was just getting ready to install attic stairs and replace all the dry-wall where the water drips in.
Will my roof have to be re-engineered?I can`t afford this right now,I`m going to call my insurance company maybe they can help.
Any thoughts on what may need to be done?

Sharon

__________________

"You can only come to the morning through the shadows."~J.R.R.Tolkien

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12/22/10, 09:37 AM
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: East TN
Posts: 6,976

Picture might help. If there isn't enough pitch where 2 roofs join it will be hard to keep the water out. Gobbing silicon is not a fix just a patch. It does sound like the roof will need reengineering. Unfortunately we live in an area without many skilled craftsmen. If you can't engineer it yourself and then stand over them and make them do it right you're going to have a problem. They would rather cut corners and get done fast then do it right and have a good reputation.

__________________

"Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self confidence"
Robert Frost

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12/22/10, 10:16 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: extreme NE TN
Posts: 912

Your right about the area in which we live.I do believe there are many skilled craftsmen it`s just hard to pick the good ones out of all the fly-by-nights.The good ones are getting smart and getting licensed and insured.Too late for me though. : (
I am not knowledgeable about engineering at all,but wouldn`t they just have to build up the area in the middle,so there is no flat spot in the valley?How big a job is that?I wonder if my insurance company would help in this.

__________________

"You can only come to the morning through the shadows."~J.R.R.Tolkien

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12/22/10, 10:17 AM
motdaugrnds's Avatar
motdaugrnds
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,482

I can most certainly understand your frustration about that leak, especially after it was 2 "professionals" who had fixed your roof!

A similar thing occurred here in that we added onto an existing roof. Turned out the cause of the "drip drip" was not directly above the drip where it appeared it might be. It was actually caused by a slope in the roof itself. In our case it was the guttering. The water was actually running down "under" the guttering to the spot where it was dripping. We used black roof patching (a thick black guey stuff I have learned to LOVE) to fix it.

It appears you may, indeed, need to reengineer your roof in that area. Since it sounds like it has several roofing materials on it now (shingles and metal), taking those off down to the wood may be quite costly if you cannot do it yourself.

__________________
I am what I am! Acknowledging this is the beginning; and my growth is yet to end. http://motdaugrnds.com/farmsales ~~~~~ http://motdaugrnds.com
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12/22/10, 11:51 AM
Darren's Avatar  
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Back in the USSR
Posts: 9,329

It sounds like with snow and ice plus warm enough temperatures water can'tflow down the valley so it backs up and spreads out. If it spreads out past the valley metal, it gets the chance to leak into the house. You may just need the valley redone with wider material. I've seen the metal in widths up to 48". That still depends on the slope. If you have an almost flat slope that makes it more difficult to handle.

If you can post a picture, that would help.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12/22/10, 12:33 PM
Terri's Avatar
Singletree Moderator
HST_MODERATOR.png
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Kansas
Posts: 12,366

I am NOT trying to stump for anything here!

That being said, I joined a thing on-line called "Angie's list". Basically it says which contractors have done good work for the members: it you are pleased you give a thumbs up and if you are dissapointed you say so also, so that when you are looking for a contractor you can see what percentage of local members were satisfied with their work.

It cost me $39 dollars to join but my roof was leaking and I knew NOTHING! about the local contractors. And, when I had the roof replaced many years ago I did NOT get good service.

Fortunately mine was just needing to have sealant replaced around a pipe but he says that I will need a new roof in a while.

__________________

Last edited by Terri; 12/22/10 at 01:02 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12/22/10, 12:54 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Missouri Ozarks
Posts: 5,069

If you in fact have a dead valley or blind alley as they are called you are never going to completely eliminate leaking unless you remove the dead valley. We bought our house knowing it needed an entire new roof which is why we got it so cheap and when I climbed up on the roof to inspect it prior to purchase there were three different roof lines from various additions and we had a completely dead valley that would pond up with about a foot of water (no where for it to go) which of course leaked when it rained heavily or there was snow and ice build up.

The previous owner just kept adding shingles (6 layers in some spots) and bear grease (what I call the black roofing patch) and it still leaked. I designed a completely new roof line that raised the middle and end part of the roof but it took getting bids from 12 roofers before I found one who was competent enough to do the job and understood what it entailed. Most of the bids I got wanted to cover up the existing shingles with a steel roof (we already had way too high of a load on the roof from the multiple layers of shingles) and their suggestion was to just heavily flash the blind valley and use bear grease.

We negotiated a fixed price for the job and I supervised the entire thing from start to finish and we are very happy with the result. It cost a bit more than just trying to band aid the problem but we tore everything off down to the oak decking, repaired what needed to be repaired, put down ice ----ing material, new drip edge, raised the roof to where we now have only two valleys (none of them dead) and greatly improved the look of the house.

I suggest you find contractors in your area who also do roofs and get multiple bids to repair and fix the problem and check their references (and not the references they give you). Lots of roofers only lay down the decking and shingles but arent really capable of doing structural repair work.

__________________
www.salmonslayer-simplelife.blogspot.com
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12/22/10, 01:21 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: extreme NE TN
Posts: 912

I`ll try and post a picture later today.

Darren,this is kind of what I was thinking.Though even using wider metal wouldn`t something have to support that?

Salmonslayer,this is what I`m afraid of.


I mean BOTH roofs are less than 10 years!!I`m so mad that people don`t do the job they are supposed to do!
I can`t afford another roof,I`ll be calling my insurance company now!

__________________

"You can only come to the morning through the shadows."~J.R.R.Tolkien

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12/22/10, 10:20 PM
motdaugrnds's Avatar
motdaugrnds
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Virginia
Posts: 7,482

I do agree with Salmon as many layers of roofing does put a heavy load on rafters and top plates.

__________________
I am what I am! Acknowledging this is the beginning; and my growth is yet to end. http://motdaugrnds.com/farmsales ~~~~~ http://motdaugrnds.com
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12/22/10, 10:56 PM
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: maine
Posts: 34

Is your roof leaking at the point where the new add on connects to the existing house?
If so, remove about 12 inches of siding all the way across where the new roof touches the house. Next step is to get the flashing tucked up as far as you can under the siding and then down over the new roof about 6". If you have the standard ribbed metal roofing, you can get a gasket strip that is made for that specific pattern for the top side of the roof. Bring the flashing down over the foam gasket and your done. If you do this yourself, its about a 75$ job, if you hire a contractor, its about a 300$ job.

__________________

Last edited by overthrow; 12/22/10 at 11:17 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12/23/10, 04:24 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Former State of Franklin
Posts: 3,793

Insurance company probably won't help if this is a design or install flaw. Sorry. Insurance is for sudden damage by wind/hail/fire/etc.....not long term problems that could have been foreseen and prevented.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12/23/10, 09:36 AM
The Paw's Avatar  
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 1,110

It sounds like you are having a case of ice damming. The snow sits on the roof, and the rain cannot run down the slope past it until it melts.

Roofs with greater slopes are less prone to this problem. The greater the overlap between the two types of roofing, the more protected you are from ice damming. If the start of the new metal roof was basically tucked a few inches under the existing shingles, that is the source of your problem.

The best fix would probably be to add metal roofing over the shingles and overlap onto the addition by 36 inches or so. If it is a very shallow pitch, that might not even be enough. I don't know how often it snows in Tennessee, but if it isn't that often you might invest in a snow rake for the roof and just pull enough snow off the roof so the rain can run straight down.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12/23/10, 11:13 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northcentral MN
Posts: 14,045

My roof will leak if I let water stand behind the ice dam that forms when snow melt hits the cold uninsulated roof overhang. I fix it by raking the snow off the bottom 4' of roof.

If dam has already formed I put sidewalk salt across the dam so that it melts channels for the water to escape.

__________________

"Do you believe in the devil? You know, a supreme evil being dedicated to the temptation, corruption, and destruction of man?" Hobbs
"I'm not sure that man needs the help." Calvin

Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12/23/10, 09:06 PM
Nimrod
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

It sounds like you have been having some unusually cold weather this winter. You may be having ice dams when you have not had them before. Up here, in the great white north, the snow on our roofs doesn't melt when it is really cold outside. When the outside temp hits the low 20s the heat from the house heats the attic which heats the roof and the temperature gets warm enough to melt the snow on the majority of the roof. The water runs down the roof until it gets to the overhang. The overhang is below freezing because it is hanging out in space so the water freezes. The ice dam gets bigger until it is keeping a pool of water trapped behind it on the warm part of the roof. Water pooled on your roof will eventually find it's way through and you will have leaks.

We do several things to combat the problem. If you ventilate the attic with roof vents and soffit vents you can keep the attic cold enough that the snow on the roof won't melt. Heater cables on the roof overhangs will heat up just enough to melt channels through the ice and drain the water. Both of these are pretty radical solutions for something that doesn't happen often. I suggest you fill a nylon stocking with sidewalk salt, tie off the end, and lay it perpendicular to the edge of the roof so it is on top of the ice dam. It will melt it's way down and let the water drain while the stocking keeps the salt from being washed away. This is relativly little work and won't hurt your roof like chopping will.

__________________
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12/23/10, 10:14 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: extreme NE TN
Posts: 912

Sorry all I had to work long hours since I last posted.No picture yet.
Yes in my little corner of Tn we get snow and very cold temps all winter.It isn`t always the case that we have snow and then rain.This is when it leaks.We usually do make a channel through the snow so any water pooling in the valley can then drain into the gutter,that usually helps.Still I spent good money on the roof I`d like it not to leak!

__________________

"You can only come to the morning through the shadows."~J.R.R.Tolkien

Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12/26/10, 10:15 PM
texican's Avatar  
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Carthage, Texas
Posts: 12,159
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4nTN View Post
Will my roof have to be re-engineered?I can`t afford this right now,I`m going to call my insurance company maybe they can help.
Any thoughts on what may need to be done?

Sharon
Question is, was it "ever" engineered? Sounds like it was just added on, without regards to rules about snow and ice.

Problem with leaks, you really don't know where the leaks are, unless you remove the drywall and insulation.... the leak could be coming from somewhere else than where you think.

If you have a metal roof below, you really need a long piece of metal transition going under the shingles (flashing) [which means at least one row, the double first row, and the above row of shingles are removed, flashing, probably at least 12" up the roof lain, then the shingles replaced... you cannot expect to just slide flashing up under the shingles and have it work... shingles must be on top of the flashing and nailed/siliconed down] and on top of the metal roofing. The underside of the flashing on top of the metal roofing needs to be sealed with foam and or silicone to completely seal it off. If your metal roof is mostly flat, someone needs to be shot... flat roofs, if they have a 'transition' will leak at the transition.
__________________

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity. Seneca
Learning is not compulsory... neither is survival. W. Edwards Deming

Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 12/27/10, 01:16 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 467

Without photos, it sounds to me to be a combination of "no engineering", and wrong materials. Proper engineering would eliminate the valleys. Unless you eliminate the valleys, there is no material (that I know of...certainly NOT silicone) that will solve the problem. Henry's has a wide variety of roofing materials...some for installation, some for 'temporary' repairs. Do not expect one to do the job that it was not designed for. They are all somewhat expensive (relatively), but do quite well what they were designed to do. Water lives by the rules of gravity...and also by the rule that it will follow the path of least resistance to follow gravity...SHeesh flows down hill. Silicone will not serve in TN (USDA zones 6-7), because it looses adhesive qualities somewhere around 40 degrees. With a competent roofing contractor, you can easily eliminate the valleys and be able to retain (most) of your existing materials. With that said, it will not be a big money job for him. Before you hire him, explain your problem, listen to his advice, but do not just accept his word as the 'only' way to fix the problem unless you have absolute confidence in his abilities...like any other salesman, he may be trying to sell you more than you need/want. A real pro does not need to sell you more than you need...he has too much work, and not enough time to be doing unnecessary work.

__________________
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:48 PM.