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  #1  
Old 12/14/10, 12:28 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,519
Sedore Furnace

Has anyone here bought and installed this furnace? Its really a multi-fuel stove, requires no electric to run, burns 15 different types of fuel, and is made for a lifetime.

www.sedoreusa.com

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  #2  
Old 12/14/10, 07:18 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 439

The web page is very basic. After 30+ years in the heating business I don't see how you can move water and control temperature without electricty, at least not with any effiency. I can see how the burner could work just not the radiation parts.

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  #3  
Old 12/15/10, 02:19 AM
davel745's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 3,263

If set up right a stove heating hot water doesn’t need a pump the water moves by itself from hot to cold.

As far as a Sedore stove goes it is a little tricky to operate, I plan to buy one hopefully next year. It is a good stove and will hold a fire overnight. And last for a long time.

The video I saw showed the logs being placed in the stove standing up on end.

Dave

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  #4  
Old 12/15/10, 01:07 PM
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: W. NY
Posts: 35

I,m another one thinking about buying a Sedore so I hope some folks have some more info about using one, and any input about them.

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  #5  
Old 12/16/10, 04:08 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Montana
Posts: 439
Quote:
Originally Posted by davel745 View Post
If set up right a stove heating hot water doesn’t need a pump the water moves by itself from hot to cold.
Dave
Agree but thermostatically? Are they going with air stats and a compressor?
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  #6  
Old 12/17/10, 07:42 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Ohio
Posts: 69

Ohiogal, I too am in Ohio and looked at the stoves after I read your post. If you get one I would love to hear how it works in our climate. I saw on a Canadian website there were several different models that I didn't see on the US site. Do you know if they are available here? Thanks for the info you have already shared!

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  #7  
Old 12/17/10, 09:22 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,519

I'm going to order mine early next week. I've decided to get a window option, and also the coils for hooking up to my hot water system.
I have an open floor plan in my Cape Cod style home - whatever doesn't circulate goes up the staircase so having no blower is not an issue. Besides, I figure if there is an issue with air movement, I can supplement with a box fan in strategic places.
I'm very attracted to the multi-fuel burning ability, along with the long burn to heat the house. I have propane as a backup and the price just keeps climbing - so this is my solution to heating off the grid as my farm will generate plenty of wood to burn for home heating.
I also have friends locally that I can buy corn from. And I can stock wood pellets by buying them at end of season (I have storage capabilities).
I'll let you know how it goes. I don't expect to get the stove until the end of January, and then I have to hook it up and learn to use it.

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  #8  
Old 12/17/10, 09:17 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 25

I don't understand its called a furnace boiler but where is the water? I looked at the manual and there's no mention of water hook ups just that its not a space heater. How does the heat get moved in the house?

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  #9  
Old 12/18/10, 05:49 AM
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Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 3,263

There is an option for adding stainless steel water coils to the stove.

I wrote to the guy and he said that the EPA made him call it a furnace, why I don’t know.

The unit can cause a lot of smoke to enter the house when refueling if not used properly opened, as it is a top loader. I believe but don’t know, but I have heard that the top needs to be cracked open just a little for a few seconds to get the draft going in the right direction before opening it fully to put wood in. This has been the biggest complaint I have heard. Some have said they use a ½ inch piece of wood to prop the top open for 30 seconds or so. Again not sure. There is a U tube video of the inventor loading the stove. (You can tell from the video he isn’t up on current Electronics). Type Sedore stove in the u tube search. The stove works well as long as you learn to use it properly.

I too am going to get the door and legs.

Lemans has a hot water unit that can be adapted to the stove and it works thermostatically (Spelling)

I hope you get good use from the stove.

Best regards,

Dave

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  #10  
Old 12/18/10, 10:28 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,519

Williams Farm, the heat gets moved much like the old gravity furnaces that you operated in the basement and it rose to the rooms based on the ductwork. This is radiant heat - no blower so no electric. Your house may not be suitable for this type of furnace if you do not have an open floor plan or are interested in using box fans to circulate the heat.
The US laws require it to be listed as a furnace, not a wood stove.

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  #11  
Old 01/03/11, 09:36 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 1,519

After much shopping, I finally settled on a Quadrafire Millenium wood stove. I decided against the Sedore for several reasons. #1 is that I felt it was too expensive for a plain jane stove and there was no trim packages available and no blower option, plus there was an issue with clearances in my home (too big and possibly too hot). #2 was that the shipping issues were just too great for me to overcome. #3 was that in reality, I'm going to burn mostly wood as that is what I have in abundance on my farm and the Quadrafire is ultra-efficient and will reduce pollution both in and out of the house. This is a big issue for me having asthma.
The Quadrafire is a nice unit, well priced, and extremely efficient (93%). I'll get it in a couple of weeks, and I'll install it and see how it does. I was very impressed with the amount of heat the showroom model threw off without running the blower. It has a burn time of 11-14 hours, so that should eliminate the re-stocking issue that I have on my old stove (Appalacian Trail).

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  #12  
Old 01/06/14, 11:54 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 64

I saw this in Backwoodsman...any info on using this as an outside boiler....or transfer 40 feet underground from garage...or inside an insulated building specific for it.

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  #13  
Old 01/06/14, 01:40 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: North Central MN
Posts: 2,515

In my old house the boiler and radiators were added after it was built. The pipes from the furnace in the basement were about 4" in diameter with smaller pipes branching off to individual radiators. When it was originally installed the furnace was an oil fired type. The water circulated because hot water rises. There was no pump.

I looked at Sedore stove a few years ago. It seems they are built like a downdraft gassifier. The smoke and exaust are drawn through the coals. A gassifier provides a limited amount of oxygen so the smoke and exaust gasses are converted into flamable gasses. The stove provides enough oxygen that the smoke and exaust gasses are burned completly. This should result in excelent efficiency. I didn't buy one because of price and the chimny has to be at least 15 feet long from the top of the stove to draw properly..

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