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  #1  
Old 08/01/10, 06:13 PM
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Who Homesteads in Wyoming

Hi everyone! I'm thinking of moving to wyoming, it's one of my favorite places to visit. I'd like to know if anyone on here homesteads in wyoming, i wondered about there growing season, weather? I've been there in june (yellowstone) and later in the fall for a mule deer hunt. I'd like to know the weather the rest of the year.

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  #2  
Old 08/01/10, 07:21 PM
 
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Grew up on a ranch in Montana, just 40 miles north of Sheridan, WY ... same climate. Winters are severe, if you are not used to northern winters, you may be in for a real shock. Lots of wind and the below zero temperatures plus wind chill can make for difficult winters.

More snow in the mountain areas, of course. Not a lot of rain. You get the snow melt and spring rains for moisture and that's what "makes" dry land crops ... one "growth" of pasture grass, one cutting of grass hay, they do grow oats, barley and wheat as dry land crops but most cropland depends on sub-irrigation in meadows along creeks or rivers or are grown where there is irrigation water available.

You will have to water a garden and most of your windbreak trees and bushes need to have low water requirements and will need to be watered to start. Water is a major issue, water rights can be tricky. You need to know what the local regulations are.

The actual growing season is short as well, in most places. Ours was about 90 days. We usually got more than that, but hard frosts are not uncommon in late May and as early as mid-September.

Snow amounts can vary, as can the actual "snow season" but I will say I've been snowed on every month except August ... not every year, but several times in June and at least once in July, a couple of times in September. Summers can be hot, especially in July and August. You can get temperatures occasionally in the high 90s, but you won't be dealing with high humidity and it cools off significantly at night.

I loved it and always will, but it isn't for everyone.

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  #3  
Old 08/01/10, 09:07 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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I've lived in northern Wyoming all my life (55 years now). A friend who grew up in Virginia said our growing season was about 15 minutes. Seriously, we are zone 3.5 to 4 with little to no rain from mid-May until snowfall. Gardening is challenging at best. I choose the shortest season hybrids I can find or I will have no tomatoes or corn. This is really agriculture on the edge. If you don't irrigate, you have no produce.

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  #4  
Old 08/01/10, 10:52 PM
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What part of Wyoming? The state varies quite a bit.

I'm in Casper

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  #5  
Old 08/01/10, 11:55 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: ozark foothills, Mo
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Why

I'll admit I once had a hankering fer some property in Wy., but after visiting and looking around I realize I'm much better off here in the Ozarks...Lands cheaper and more available here and will carry much more livestock than that Wy. junk land..Only advantage to live to live there , that i can see, Is it's beautiful scenery...land prices and availability suck like a Hoover in Wy. I am presently married to a native of that state..wish we could move there,but it'll never happen...much easier to get by here..

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  #6  
Old 08/10/10, 07:01 AM
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Mjb-I'm in Wyoming outside of Cheyenne. We moved here from Southern Indiana (3 season garden w/o greenhouse) 18 months ago. It is very diffrent as others have said. We are adjusting and learning. We are at 6800 feet on the high plains, wind, wind and more wind. Wind is your big enemey. We have build a greenhouse to avoid the wind, heat up the warm weather crops and to try some 3 season gardening. The big pay off here is SUMMER!

We do not have air conditioning!!! YEA (you pay for it in heat bills from Oct.-May). This morning it is August 10. The morning temp at 6:00 am is 58 (great sleeping weather) and the afternoon will be 88. Humidity is something that is almost non existant (helps with the basement line drying of the clothes in the winter). Winter is very harsh, you can go nutty along about Arpil when you are still getting snow storms-however-we don't have the cloudy midwestern skies all winter. It is either snowing or the sun is out! Helps with your mood. Now remember I live in the South Eastern Corner of the state-the rest of the state is much harsher. Northern CO around Fort Collins is a whole diffrent world and might be a place for someone to live who would love the beauty but still want the access to the western playground.

In our area you DO NOT plant a garden until June 1. Your harvest will be finished by about September 15. If you want tomatoes, peppers or other warm season crops you need a greenhouse. However, this is the first summer I have had cabbage and brocolli (we always did it in the fall in the east) and I've got a fall crop going. My husbands brussell sprouts look great. We can grow ruebarb and horseradish. The key to a lot of the garden is protecting it from the wind and water, water, water. We have rasberries and choke cherries on a drip line.

You can see a lot of our homesteading activities at my blog listed below. Well the wind has dyed down from the night and the sun is comming up. It is time to water the garden before it gets hot out. Hot, ha, ha, ha...from a girl who grew up in OH/IN native cowboys/girls have no idea what hot is.......

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  #7  
Old 08/10/10, 09:25 AM
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I had in mind that the stae was an already full state. We hear so much about it being a major draw for the rich and famous who have these huge ranches. I am surprised there is any land available for low income homesteaders. Also had the impression that land was almost untouchable for the same homesteader type of folks. I mean it would seem strange if you payed a fortune for a bit of land then claimed to live the homestead lifestyle!If I could afford that I wouldn't need to be frugal!lol

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  #8  
Old 08/10/10, 09:53 AM
 
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Location: Wyoming
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnokie View Post
I had in mind that the stae was an already full state. We hear so much about it being a major draw for the rich and famous who have these huge ranches. I am surprised there is any land available for low income homesteaders. Also had the impression that land was almost untouchable for the same homesteader type of folks. I mean it would seem strange if you payed a fortune for a bit of land then claimed to live the homestead lifestyle!If I could afford that I wouldn't need to be frugal!lol
Homesteading is about going back to basics and providing as much as you can of your daily needs yourself. Being frugal is not the end goal for everyone.

Adding. If frugal was the only goal then I would buy my eggs and chicken at the store on sale.
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  #9  
Old 08/10/10, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnokie View Post
I had in mind that the stae was an already full state. We hear so much about it being a major draw for the rich and famous who have these huge ranches. I am surprised there is any land available for low income homesteaders. Also had the impression that land was almost untouchable for the same homesteader type of folks. I mean it would seem strange if you payed a fortune for a bit of land then claimed to live the homestead lifestyle!If I could afford that I wouldn't need to be frugal!lol
Wyoming has a population density of 5.4 people per square mile.
The only state that's thinner on people is Alaska at 1.2.
I think the rich people hang out in the mountains, but Eastern Wyoming is pretty sparse.
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  #10  
Old 08/10/10, 03:44 PM
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I would be willing to bet that if you chopped off the western mountains, the population density would approach that of Alaska.

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  #11  
Old 08/10/10, 04:17 PM
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I'd take that bet. I don't think it would change by that much.

All of Wyomings cities over 15k population exist in the plains. Of those only Rock Springs is in the western portion. http://www.citypopulation.de/USA-Wyoming.html Jackson doesn't even hit 10k for population.

When you do visit the the western mountains propably 90% of the people you see don't live here or at least not full time to be counted as residents.

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Old 08/10/10, 04:24 PM
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Wy

We're 50 mi south of Cheyenne. ne CO, western NE, eastern WY are all pretty much the same. Once known as the great American Desert...you have to water. Great place to live. It's the west...dressing up is a new pr of jeans. I grew up in IA where anything grows not here...LOVE the fact there is no humidity.

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  #13  
Old 08/10/10, 07:42 PM
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I'm currently in a suburb of Atlanta, GA, but the dream of my husband and myself is to move out to Wyoming.

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  #14  
Old 08/10/10, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wy_white_wolf View Post
When you do visit the the western mountains propably 90% of the people you see don't live here or at least not full time to be counted as residents.
I agree about the summer people, I had forgotten about that. The Bitterroot Valley in Montana is much the same although not nearly as large as Jackson Hole or Cody, both which have unbelievable traffic problems in the summer.
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