Oldtime hand crank grindstone for sharpening - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 07/05/10, 05:54 PM
 
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Oldtime hand crank grindstone for sharpening

Sythes and drawknives. Is it any good for that? I dont know what type of stone it has on it, I would say that its not much abrasive at all.

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  #2  
Old 07/05/10, 06:13 PM
 
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Probably not. Have one of those and the grit of the stone is too coarse for putting on a fine edge like is needed for either.

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  #3  
Old 07/05/10, 07:27 PM
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I ordered two scythe stones, I think you have to use hand held ones because of the angle of the blade.

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  #4  
Old 07/05/10, 08:01 PM
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The ones I've seen (and the one I own) all have stone that is far too abrasive to be of benefit.

I finish the edge on my finer cutting tools with wet or dry sandpaper. Depending upon the usage of the tool to determine the fineness of the paper I use on it, 1500 for some, 600 for others.

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  #5  
Old 07/05/10, 09:08 PM
 
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Scythe grass blades require an anvil and hammer...

They sell one that is made to be stuck in the ground so you can peen the edge w/ a hammer...

We had an oval shaped stone +/or just used an 8 mill bastard file after standing the halft up on the stub end. This was using Austrian grass blades & my pappy would always tell dad he was doing it wrong...

I always had a patch of poison ivy on my left wrist from holding the top of the blade w/ my left hand where the leather work glove stopped & my wrist touched the 'juice' on the blade while I was filing w/ my right hand.

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  #6  
Old 07/05/10, 09:11 PM
 
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I don't like using grindstones for anything with a cutting blade unless it is to just redo the angle and then only to get close. They remove too much metal, are to hard to get the correct taper without being wavy, and have too much potential for getting too hot and taking out the temper. They are great for making something new and removing excess metal though.

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  #7  
Old 07/05/10, 10:27 PM
 
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Well, I dont have a peening hammer OR Anvil, and just to cut some swatches of Johnson Grass here there and yonder, im not gonna get them.

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  #8  
Old 07/05/10, 10:29 PM
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Well, to sharpen an ax you use a mill bastard file, would that work on those, too?

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  #9  
Old 07/05/10, 10:34 PM
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Wow, i have been sharpening my tools all wrong, all these years. And that bastard file best find himself a Father real soon. He He >Thanks Marc

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  #10  
Old 07/06/10, 01:41 AM
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I use a square hand whetstone on most of my edged knifes, scythes, etc. There are several of them of various grits so depending on the job, I'll pick the one which seems best. Chisels have a holder which holds the blade at a steady angle to the whetstone but for the rest it's mostly done by eye and feel. Kitchen knives get a steel used after the whetstone. We have a treadle operated grinder as well as an electric grinder and they are used to sharpen the cruder edges such as those found on shovels and hoes.

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  #11  
Old 07/06/10, 03:16 AM
 
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Hand crank grindstone

Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmBoyBill View Post
Sythes and drawknives. Is it any good for that? I dont know what type of stone it has on it, I would say that its not much abrasive at all.
The hand crank grind stone and foot pedaled types (large wheels) were used mostly for axes and weed hooks,n' kaiser blades (sling blade)large butcher knives or initial edge on smaller blades and chisels..Most had a tin can hanging over them that you poured full of water and it dribbled on the stone as you cranked and sharpened...made the stone cut better and if you could have cranked it hard enough to get hot, it would have prevented the heat build up..
Dad usta tell about cranking the stone of granddads when he was seven years old(1924) they charged timber workers a few cents for using the stone and it was Dad's job to crank it for them...Talked about this one old feller that would sharpen his axe and try to press it so hard against the stone to stop it's motion as he was cranking...he was kinda proud that he couldn't stop it, but dad said it wasn't because the old feller didn't try..
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Old 07/06/10, 01:49 PM
 
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Went to an O Riellys Auto. All they had was 80grit, the finist, and they thought it would cut bad. Think in my other post about this, somebody said 300 grit. Where can I get it??

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  #13  
Old 07/06/10, 10:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmBoyBill View Post
Well, I dont have a peening hammer OR Anvil, and just to cut some swatches of Johnson Grass here there and yonder, im not gonna get them.
File it, long smooth strokes the length of the blade...file one side only & then one quick stroke on the other side to smooth the wire edge...

Leherman's sells them and blades & hafts too... I have an aluminum strait shaft at the cabin that's gonna need a new blade...to many rocks...
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  #14  
Old 07/06/10, 10:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmBoyBill View Post
Went to an O Riellys Auto. All they had was 80grit, the finist, and they thought it would cut bad. Think in my other post about this, somebody said 300 grit. Where can I get it??
Go to most any hardware store and you will find it in the painting section.
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  #15  
Old 07/07/10, 02:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmBoyBill View Post
Went to an O Riellys Auto. All they had was 80grit, the finist, and they thought it would cut bad. Think in my other post about this, somebody said 300 grit. Where can I get it??
A shop which sells to find woodworkers or auto body refinishers should have sandpaper up to 1600 grit or even finer. There is generally a choice of wet or dry sandpaper, too.

You can also use the bottom of glazed porcelin pottery, too. Check the bottom of your coffee cup, it might make a good fine grindstone for smaller knives.
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  #16  
Old 07/07/10, 03:30 PM
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Look around for one of those little diamond rod sharpeners. Mine was couple bucks or so and basically plastic handle that holds two diamond dust rods at an intersecting angle. Plastic does good job protecting your hand. Has one slot for double edge and one for single edge. Works fairly well. I use mine mostly for kitchen knives and scissors, but no reason it couldnt work on a scythe or drawknife. Its by far best/easiest way I've found to sharpen stainless steel cutting edges on cheaper knives. Not best way for traditional high carbon cutting edges, but sounds like you are looking for cheap and quick, not best way. I got mine at A2Z but think I've seen simular at Wallyworld. Its cheap enough to be worth a try and not feel bad if it doesnt do what you want.

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  #17  
Old 07/07/10, 03:43 PM
 
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Found the sandpaper. 320 grit at Atwoods, a farm/hardware store

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  #18  
Old 07/07/10, 03:44 PM
 
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HJ The thing you describe looks/sounds like a sharpener that Lehmans sells. When im at WM, Ill look for it.

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  #19  
Old 07/09/10, 07:53 PM
 
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I have an old foot treadle powered stone. It may not be "the" thing to use these days but I can assure anyone that would try one that they are darn handy. For things like axes, hoes, shovels, etc. they do the job much faster than a file and better in some cases. An old tool, but one worth having if you get a chance at one.

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  #20  
Old 07/10/10, 12:13 AM
 
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Does it have a water tub below it? Is it a wetstone wheel?

Dad always used his to sharpen the sickle mower blades & his sythe. Worked well for him. They are a very fine stone. He put a electric motor on it. Actually had it on the jackshaft for years, then got rid of that & put it's own motor on it. They turn slow - you can touch it with a finger without damage - not for long, but....

The water is important. Don't use it without the water. And slow turning.

Think some here are thinking of a coruser dry wheel - which maybe is what you are looking at too?

The slow wetstones were designed for this sort of job.

--->Paul

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