What type of apple tree is best for Middle TN - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 04/12/10, 05:09 PM
digApony's Avatar
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Question What type of apple tree is best for Middle TN

Hi, I would love to get an apple tree, however I am not familiar in growing apple trees in the warmer weather in the South.

Does anyone know which is best to get or should I not bother?

I'd like an apple that is mostly resistant to spot, and fungus.

Also, I do not want to spray dangerous chemicals, and if I do spray I'd want organic sprays.

I don't care about having a large "pretty" apple, just an all around good apple for eating, apple butter, sauce and of course PIES!
(Am I asking too much?)

digApony

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Old 04/12/10, 05:19 PM
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I'm in east Tn and last year I planted and semi-dwarf gala (great for canned apple pie filling), a semi dwarf Red delicious, and a pear tree. They look good now----made it thru the LONG COLD WINTER! How are things in the middle of the state??

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  #3  
Old 06/28/10, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2farm View Post
I'm in east Tn and last year I planted and semi-dwarf gala (great for canned apple pie filling), a semi dwarf Red delicious, and a pear tree. They look good now----made it thru the LONG COLD WINTER! How are things in the middle of the state??
Thank you. Things are great here in MTn. I read in the paper that the hay is pretty good this year and we've had rain pretty much every day. Enough to water the garden. I logged my trees so I didn't get a garden in this year, but I wish I had! I see the corn fields are green and tall already.

I have flowers in clay pots that I have only had to water once! haha.

When is the best time to plant and apple tree... late fall? That is when I plant other trees. I have never planted a fruit tree.

Thanks again,

digApony
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Old 06/28/10, 08:22 AM
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FWIW... I'm in MTN and have a couple of apple trees. Mine are getting pulled out this year due to fire blight. I knew pear trees got fire blight, but didn't know apple trees did. I'm replacing them with Cherries.

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  #5  
Old 06/28/10, 08:38 AM
 
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Location: Tennessee
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We got a Mackintosh that does really good . Got it when Rual King has their 60% off sale .Think it is on now

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  #6  
Old 06/28/10, 08:43 AM
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Tennessee
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Our Gala sets a lot of fruit but I guess we don't spray enough and they don't turn out very well. Lucky, lucky you digAPony, we are so dry here on the Plateau we are watering one thing or another all the time! If we don't get any today, none called for for another week..........

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Old 06/28/10, 11:39 AM
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I lived most of my life in N Lower Michigan where fruit orchards are abundant. The farmers spray so much fungacide and pesticides that the apples appear white before harvest. There are danger signs at the orchard entrance; enter at your own risk. I know they grow a lot of delicious type apples, but geeze. After seeing this all my life, I won't eat a mass produced apple. I don't want anything that needs that kind of spraying. I read where Liberty is the best and then Arkansas Red I think it was. They are resistant to much rust and scab, etc. I'm really not concerned about what they look like. Actually, the more an apple is let go, except for blight and worms, the more pectin they have; sour.

I researched organic fruit growing, but part of it is laying a tarp under the tree and shaking the worms and other pests off every morning! Like I don't have enough to do... haha. I understand pruning is important.

GoatsRus: We also grew a lot of cherries; mostly sour, but some sweet and they do not seem to be as suceptable to late frost or blight, and pests. You might want to consider a couple bee hives an acre or two from the trees.

Thanks all. I appreciate the advice.

Thanks SM Jim. I will take a look. I like Macs. They are a good all around apple.

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Old 06/28/10, 12:50 PM
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Just look at the days to ripen...and figure if it will work in TN. I think most of them will work just fine in your area. Fire blight will be a problem as will a few other diseases - apple cedar rust is one that comes to mind. Good luck not sparying. Disease resistant isn't disease proof but it will help.

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  #9  
Old 06/28/10, 04:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Callieslamb View Post
Just look at the days to ripen...and figure if it will work in TN. I think most of them will work just fine in your area. Fire blight will be a problem as will a few other diseases - apple cedar rust is one that comes to mind. Good luck not sparying. Disease resistant isn't disease proof but it will help.

Thanks. Oh I expect to have to spray. I just hate it though.
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  #10  
Old 06/28/10, 04:26 PM
 
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My parents in Mid TN have two apple trees in their backyard that produce pretty well, but they were there before my parents bought the house. They are a small tart green apple that ripens early August.
They never spray or do anything but most basic pruning and cleaning up fallen fruit. The apples are small (2 inches), and will have blemishes (bite marks, worm holes, scabby marks, etc.) on about 50% of the fruits, but since we use them for cooking, it doesn't matter.
I suppose if pretty, blemish-free fruit is your goal, you would have to spray. But if you want tasty fruit, and don't mind cutting your apple open to check for worms first, you don't necessarily HAVE to spray.

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  #11  
Old 06/28/10, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by kyweaver View Post
My parents in Mid TN have two apple trees in their backyard that produce pretty well, but they were there before my parents bought the house. They are a small tart green apple that ripens early August.
They never spray or do anything but most basic pruning and cleaning up fallen fruit. The apples are small (2 inches), and will have blemishes (bite marks, worm holes, scabby marks, etc.) on about 50% of the fruits, but since we use them for cooking, it doesn't matter.
I suppose if pretty, blemish-free fruit is your goal, you would have to spray. But if you want tasty
fruit, and don't mind cutting your apple open to check for worms first, you don't necessarily HAVE to spray.
We used to pick apples like that, red apples too from abandoned orchards. Scabs
are easily peeled and the worms aren't much of a bother. Like I said
they are higher in pectin and make good apple butter, etc.

I guess in the end it's more work to prepare and less yield. Fruit trees well established are probably better, I don't know. I've got a good spot for two.

I need to know when is a good time to plant them.

Thanks.
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  #12  
Old 06/28/10, 06:23 PM
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The best apple trees for your area will be the varieties offered by your local farmers co-op store or those suggested by your county extension office.

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  #13  
Old 06/29/10, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Shrek View Post
The best apple trees for your area will be the varieties offered by your local farmers co-op store or those suggested by your county extension office.
Thanks Shrek.
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