What is the going price for having block laid? - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 11/20/09, 05:03 AM
 
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What is the going price for having block laid?

My friend is in the beginning stages of planning a retirement cabin.

We are wondering what qualified masons are charging to lay standard size block for a foundation.

Years ago, the standard price that most masons charged was $1 per block plus the cost of mortar and the block.

I know prices are going to vary widely in different parts of the country...I am in Indiana. I also understand that there are lots of variables to consider, but again, just wondering what the average is in today's market.

Thanks!!!!!!

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  #2  
Old 11/20/09, 05:22 AM
 
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Location: Florida
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I haven't checked lately, but the rule of thumb used to be the cost of the block themselves. In other words, when blocks were a dollar each it cost a dollar each to have them laid. I haven't priced blocks in so long I don't have a clue what they cost now.

I don't know what the construction industry is like in Indiana, but with the slowdown you might find someone needing work badly enough to give you a deal to get the job.

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  #3  
Old 11/20/09, 07:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tyusclan View Post
I haven't checked lately, but the rule of thumb used to be the cost of the block themselves. In other words, when blocks were a dollar each it cost a dollar each to have them laid. I haven't priced blocks in so long I don't have a clue what they cost now.

I don't know what the construction industry is like in Indiana, but with the slowdown you might find someone needing work badly enough to give you a deal to get the job.
The same is true in South Carolina. If a block costs $1.00, it costs a dollar to lay it.
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  #4  
Old 11/20/09, 08:44 AM
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Depends upon the area you live in and how depressed the economy is - People are working for less here to keep food on the table. The economy has made it a different ball game.

Just call around and get some estimates....

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  #5  
Old 11/20/09, 09:36 AM
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Clove,

I've been laying up stone/block/brick for 30 years. Quotes are given by the job, not by a block x amount. Difficulty due to terrain, hollow or filled, cost of transporting materials to site, distance to travel to the job, below or above grade, and many other factors come into play...no way to boil it down to a rule of thumb. You need to call local masons for a free quote after you've made up your mind what you want done.

RF

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Old 11/20/09, 11:46 AM
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Location: East Central Illinois
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We start at $1.55 plus material as a base rate for 8's then add for complexity (multiple corners, work above chest level, 10's or 12's, crappy site conditions ect). That makes us pretty much in line with the other masons in this area and we have a reputation for doing good work. There are several cheaper masons in the area but thier work is not very good (had the "pleasure" of being called in a couple years ago to fix one of their foundations - 3" out of square and 5" elevation difference from end to end - but they worked fast and cheap).

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  #7  
Old 11/20/09, 12:29 PM
 
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I want to learn how to do stone masonry..is there a good way to learn?

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Old 11/21/09, 11:51 AM
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Ted.

I joined the union and went thru the apprenticeship program. After becoming a journeyman, I traveled thru Europe working on Churches and stone houses. This taught me a lot about old world techniques and fine tuned my skills.

RF

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  #9  
Old 11/22/09, 10:18 AM
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Am I the only one who reads this thread wondering why anyone would pay someone to have concrete block laid?

DIYers is a big reason block is still so popular...
It's a fairly straightforward process. And, there are probably at least two or three books at the library that show how it works.

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  #10  
Old 11/22/09, 10:45 AM
This is my life
 
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When we priced having our home under pinned with a block wall the only estimate we could get was $2000 with us supplying the materials, that was for a 24X56 home. DH did some reading, talked with a guy that had done it, and hit Lowes. It took us about 3 months with him working on it when he had a couple days off (worked 2 jobs at the time) and taking any help that was offered. He started on the back, so he would have a bit of experience when he got to the front LOL.

Had the house inspected about 6 months later and the inspector asked if he would be willing to do some stone work at her house.

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  #11  
Old 11/22/09, 10:46 AM
 
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Well, for one thing while it is a fairly straightforward process, you can tell a big difference in a DIY block job and one done by a mason. They may prefer to have a better quality job than they could do themselves. It also may be worth the cost to get the job done quickly instead of DIY'ing as time allows.

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  #12  
Old 11/22/09, 11:24 AM
 
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Paid $1/block for 6" underpinning block laying. No way could I have done the job as well or as good as the guy I hired.

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  #13  
Old 11/22/09, 06:13 PM
 
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The price I got last week here, Western NC, is $2.00 per block. I bought all the block, cement and sand and he is supposed to bring the tools.

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  #14  
Old 11/22/09, 08:49 PM
 
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Thanks for the input everyone. I appreciate it!

The act of cementing block together may not be rocket science, but watching an expereinced mason lay block is amazing. It is simply stunning to me that an experienced mason can take an out-of-level footer with more than a dozen low spots and lay a block foundation that is not only perfectly level at every point , but also truly square.

For my OP, my friend doesn't even have plans put together for his future home, so getting estimates is pretty useless at this time. No sense wasting a contractor's time for an estimate that may not be any good a year from now.

I am sure his foundation will cost quite a bit. It is a smaller cabin, so less block may mean more cost. It is also going to be in the middle of nowhere, and the last time I checked, qualified masons and their crews will most likely have to be compensated for the extra gas and travel time.

Again, thanks for the input. Yes, it is like asking what a bale of hay costs...but it will serve as a super basic guideline for design purposes.

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  #15  
Old 11/23/09, 10:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmac15 View Post
Had the house inspected about 6 months later and the inspector asked if he would be willing to do some stone work at her house.
I guess that's been my experience, too.
Most people I know who've undertaken block have mastered the process pretty easily. I've seen both "professional" and DIYer and have to say I've never been able to tell a quality difference between the two. Beyond the first couple of rows, that is.

However, despite myself rarely having more money than time, I guess I can understand that. There's a reason most people don't do things themselves, afterall...
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  #16  
Old 11/23/09, 12:01 PM
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Don't forget to ask around if there are any Amish that can do the job (if you have them in your area). They did a great job for us and were a lot cheaper than any of the "English".

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  #17  
Old 11/23/09, 12:19 PM
 
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Location: Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
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.............Common Sense would tell A DIY'er too pay a professional Mason too setup and lay the first couple of rows so everything is PLumb ! Then it's just a matter of replicating the process . , fordy

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