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  #1  
Old 12/05/08, 09:02 PM
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The Most Valuable Crop?

A post in another thread got me to thinking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nevada View Post
How does a farmer earn enough to make mortgage payments on a farm that he paid $25,000 to $50,000 per acre for? I'm not saying it couldn't be done, but I'm pretty sure that it can't be done growing a crop that's legal.
What would the most valuable crop be?

I have a situation where a pipeline company may pay me for the value of crops destroyed when they build their pipeline. So it would seem most rewarding to have a very valuable crop in that place.
Ideally something cheap and easy to plant and get started but expencive and hard to harvest ....since I wont actually have to harvest it.
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Old 12/05/08, 09:18 PM
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Around here it would probably be tobacco
Maybe where you are it could be saffron

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Old 12/05/08, 09:35 PM
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The most valuable crop gown in the USA is Marijuana, and has been number one for quite a few years now.~! And this IS TRUE BTW.

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Old 12/05/08, 09:46 PM
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Talking to a local veggie grower the highest profit (therefore the cheapest to grow for the return) is potatoes. Seed stock is cheap, planting not overly difficult and harvesting requires mechanical assistance or hand digging both being the highest cost of the investment. I'd think something like flowers could be worth more but seed stock might be unreal!!

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Old 12/05/08, 09:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arabian knight View Post
The most valuable crop gown in the USA is Marijuana, and has been number one for quite a few years now.~! And this IS TRUE BTW.

LOL do YOU want to be the one in court argueing the value of THAT crop?
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  #6  
Old 12/05/08, 10:41 PM
 
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I haven't looked at costs and value for a while, but ginseng might be something to think about. Do you get to factor in return for multiple years?

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  #7  
Old 12/05/08, 10:47 PM
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I started looking into sweet potatoes. I also would like to know the answer to this question.

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  #8  
Old 12/05/08, 10:51 PM
 
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I think you will have a rude awakening with that plan, but good luck.

When they put a pipeline through here, they didn't even pay for the crop - they condemned the entire farms, ran it through wherever it best suited them, and got around to paying what the judge figured was about right 3 years later. When the farm renters ask for their crop payment, were told that was paid to the land owners already. When asked, the land owners said they didn't even get the land value right, much less anything for the growing crop. Judge just smiled & said everything was fine, end of story.

So, real good luck to you.

Since this is not your historical crop, will you keep your fertilizer & bug spray bills, weeding cost bills, etc? Come August when they go through, you won't get much for a bug infested weed patch......

--->Paul

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  #9  
Old 12/06/08, 12:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arabian knight View Post
The most valuable crop gown in the USA is Marijuana, and has been number one for quite a few years now.~! And this IS TRUE BTW.
It is true actually. It is America's number 1 cash crop. Just think how well farmers could do if it were only re-legalized. Imagine turning US farmers loose on such a lucrative cash crop. I have absolutely no doubt that in a couple of years we would be producing the finest marijuana on the planet in more varieties than you could count and we would be dominating the global market.

Back during the war we grew hemp on this farm. The government begged farmers around here to plant hemp. Did really well with it and it was easy to grow and easy on the soil. Now of course the government spends billions trying to eradicate feral hemp and in the process is destroying the genetic base of hemp plants which have been painstakingly bred for centuries to develop strains which are suited to the north American climate and soils. That's the real crime. All of the hard work of our forefathers (you know like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson-the guys who grew and developed marijuana) is being destroyed just so the government can stop people from smoking a plant.

Add it to the list of tragedies inflicted on the American people by The War On (some) Drugs.
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  #10  
Old 12/06/08, 12:25 AM
 
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How will they determine what they pay you?

Will they send a crop consultant, and measure plants per acre with a county wide yield average?

When will they do the work? Near planting time when sprouts are coming up, or near harvest when yields will be close to calculating.

My guess is that they will take a county average, and add a bonus of 20%, and write you a check for market rates at that time.

Since this pipeline is coming to you, why not ask some folks what they have recieved, or just ask the pipeline company?

Get too out of line with your expectations of what they owe you with exotic crops, and they might hassle you with new problems or non-payment.

I wonder if you planted trees, or at least tree seed to sell the saplings? Have you priced some tree saplings on ebay? Some of those saplings sell for $5-$10 each!!!! Even at $2 per sapling....The going rate for seed is typically less than 10 cents each.

Just my 2 cents.

Clove

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  #11  
Old 12/06/08, 02:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clovis View Post
How will they determine what they pay you?

Will they send a crop consultant, and measure plants per acre with a county wide yield average?

When will they do the work? Near planting time when sprouts are coming up, or near harvest when yields will be close to calculating.

My guess is that they will take a county average, and add a bonus of 20%, and write you a check for market rates at that time.

Since this pipeline is coming to you, why not ask some folks what they have recieved, or just ask the pipeline company?

Get too out of line with your expectations of what they owe you with exotic crops, and they might hassle you with new problems or non-payment.

I wonder if you planted trees, or at least tree seed to sell the saplings? Have you priced some tree saplings on ebay? Some of those saplings sell for $5-$10 each!!!! Even at $2 per sapling....The going rate for seed is typically less than 10 cents each.

Just my 2 cents.

Clove
Having worked at a tree nursery Pine seedlings sell for $25 per thousand Hardwood seedlings sell for $10 per hundred unless they are between 3 to 5 years old then they go for a lot more. That is what the pipeline will pay.
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  #12  
Old 12/06/08, 06:53 AM
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Truffels, saffron, ginseng in that order

ETA: if you're going to stay legal

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  #13  
Old 12/06/08, 07:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fantasymaker View Post
LOL do YOU want to be the one in court argueing the value of THAT crop?
I hope this isn't considered too rude I now it isn't on topic. fantasymaker's post reminded me of this story and I thought it was a little funny.

A Fort Collins couple is planning to sue the city and Larimer County for more than $200,000 after police officers destroyed their 39 marijuana plants two years ago.

//www.breakthematrix.com/Alternative-Medicine/Couple-to-Sue-over-Police-Destroying-Pot
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  #14  
Old 12/06/08, 07:57 AM
 
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Would a perennial plant get you more money if you could argue future returns?

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Old 12/06/08, 08:06 AM
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Peppers.

Seriously, look it up Not the normal varieties, the medicinal types. Ratings off the charts and hazmat suits to harvest and handle......all that capsasin (sp?) in products for joint pain and whatnot, etc.

There are herbs you might look into also, legal ones.

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Old 12/06/08, 08:20 AM
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Jumbo leeches

Dig a pond, grow and harvest leeches for fishing bait. Leeches sell for $12.99/pound around here.

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  #17  
Old 12/06/08, 09:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fantasymaker View Post
A post in another thread got me to thinking.

Quote:
$25K to $50K per acre land
What would the most valuable crop be? I have a situation where a pipeline company may pay me for the value of crops destroyed when they build their pipeline. So it would seem most rewarding to have a very valuable crop in that place. Ideally something cheap and easy to plant and get started but expencive and hard to harvest ....since I wont actually have to harvest it.
First of all I wouldn't buy land that cost $25,000 to $50,000 per acre. That's developer land. Don't try and compete with housing developments as they are the most lucrative crop.

After that it really depends on the type of land. We live on mountain land. There is nothing flat and very little even close to flat on our land. That makes cropping rather difficult. Somewhere else crops would be great.

Something like 95% of our land is in forest - we raise trees, primarily furniture and veneer quality hardwoods along with some softwoods. This fits well with our steep land.

Then we have 40 acres or so of fields of which we use about 20 for our farming. We raise poultry, sheep and pigs on pasture. The pigs provide most of our income. They're a good use of the land and can deal with the slope, rocks, etc. Pastured livestock is the best use and the most profitable 'crop'.

The remaining 20 or so acres are marshes in the bottom of the valley. Not much cropping value there but they sure are pretty.

I'm not interested in the illegal crop potentials. It matters not how one feels about the law when they come to escort you away.

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in the mountains of Vermont
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Old 12/06/08, 09:57 AM
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Christmas trees

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  #19  
Old 12/06/08, 10:43 AM
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I love the idea of planting peppers, or perhaps poison ivy for medication research. Perhaps they would decide to work around your property rather than go over it.

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  #20  
Old 12/06/08, 10:57 AM
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If a pipeline is coming through, are you going to plant a 'crop' only on the 20 to 30' right of way? Or, are you going to plant the entire field? Most crops cost money to put in the ground, plowing, planting, fertilizer, fencing (if necessary to protect the crop). If there's a dispute, about the value of the crop, you'll be able to hire an appraiser, the pipeline company will have one, and if they can't agree, the court will appoint a third. If you have a long strip of crops only on the r.o.w., chances are, you'll get diddly, over the cost of the basic lease fee. Once the pipeline is in, you can grow crops, but not trees.

I don't think you're going to actually make money in such an enterprise, if you value your time at anything. Even if you do have a legitimate crop, you're only going to basically get your money back, on the deal. You'll never be able to plant any kinds of trees, as most pipeline row's have to be cleared of permanent trees once a year.

And on marijuana... if it were legalized, the exorbitant prices would drop to a couple dollars a pound. It's a weed! It grows like a weed. The only reason its such a lucrative crop is because it's illegal. If they make tobacco illegal to grow and sell, the cost of a pack of smokes would jump ten fold quickly. Basic supply and demand economics.

I've got several different pipelines crossing my property. They mow yearly. On the rare occasion they need to get heavy equipment on the pipeline, I'm not going to get paid diddly... however, I can usually finagle an hour or so out of the company, using one of their trackhoes or dozers. My catch? They only have a row down the pipeline proper, not across my roads accessing the pipeline. I usually wait until they're on the pipeline, go over and chat with the supervisor, and work my way into I'm needing an hour or so done closeby... if they balk, I say that's ok... but they'll need to drive back to the pavement, three miles away, on the pipeline row only... and I know it's impassable to trucks... and usually a swamp is a no go area... I'll pull the original row easement papers out, show him where there's no access except on the row, and he smiles, and I smile, and I get what I want...

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