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  #1  
Old 09/21/08, 01:09 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Western North Carolina
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How to build a chimney?

We are putting a wood stove in an enclosed porch room. The price to put the metal lined pipes for chimney is way too expensive and so we want to build our own. I am having problems finding instructions online. Any links appreciated.

Basically, we thought we would buy those cement blocks that have the hole already there for the clay liner, then place the metal connect piece (the man who came to clean the other chimney's said he would show us where to hook it in) to the stove..........but how high to make the cement block/clay flue part and then where to start the metal stack part?

Any suggestions appreciated. Thanks

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  #2  
Old 09/21/08, 04:01 PM
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DH built our chimney, and promised he would not do another...we had to go up about 30 feet (roof is a cape cod). I know there is a clean out, and he could only lay two or so chimney blocks at a time. He had to heft them up on this back up a ladder...they weigh quite a bit, I dont remember the exact number now, maybe 80lbs?? If you try to lay too many in one day the mortar will push out from the weight of the block.

The chimney has to be a few feet above your roofline for it to work properly. Ours is closer to the edge of the house where the roof is low, but we had to go higher than the cape peak. He has cables attached to the chimnney blocks and roof I guess to stabalize it.

When he comes home I will get the lay down, but as I mentioned, it was literally back breaking, dangerous work . When i suggested we hook up the antique coal wood stove I have in the kitchen, he said we would do the pipe

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  #3  
Old 09/21/08, 04:47 PM
 
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Beaglebiz is right on the money. Be sure to figure correct height, also plan for a cleanout door and a thimble(clay pipe thru wall). Also keep in mind where it will reach the roof and if you have to cut the soffit and or gutter. Lifting the blocks,liner and mortar can be a challenge. Also consider how you will work when it gets over your head, laying block from a ladder is a circus act. Also have to consider pouring a footer to support the chimney. The metal starts looking better quickly. Did you price a metal chimney at Lowes? I used their system and it worked great.

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  #4  
Old 09/21/08, 04:49 PM
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We didn't think we could afford the metal insulated stove pipe either - but after we priced out the materials and then necessary help it came out to around the same cost. Unless you have your heart set on regular chimney, check out Lowe's for pricing on their metal insulated pipe. Another HT member pointed me in that direction and it was a great help. Good luck.

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  #5  
Old 09/21/08, 04:55 PM
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The metalbestos pipe is alot better bang for the buck. The flue tiles that the supply places get now days are of poor quality. I put our chimney in two years ago and had to hunt through pallets of tiles to find good ones, most had small cracks in them and if you don't catch it you will have to reline the chimney.

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  #6  
Old 09/21/08, 06:34 PM
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I've built two chimney block chimneys in my life, both about 25 or so years ago. One was for a one story house (my home) and the other for a two story (a friends house). Both chimneys were made on the outside of the house and are still standing.

I'm gonna be sketchy with my description, please ask any questions if you require more details.

1. Dig a pit ~2.5-feet deeper than the frost level where you live.
2. Footing: 2.5'l x 2.5'w x 2.5'd solid block of concrete and strengthened with rebar. I used a slighly moistened concrete for this (dry footing) and packed it down every 6" If you pour the concrete footing, wait a couple weeks before you start laying chimney block for the concrete to set up. Tie the footing into your home's foundation by busting a couple of holes thru the concrete blocks that are adjacent to the chimney's footing. Make sure the concrete of the chimney footing goes into these holes and the voids in the concrete block foundation of the home.
3. If you use a dry footing, like I did, you can start laying the chimney block right away.
5. Start by just laying chimney block (no flue). Fill the center of the chimney block with motar (or sand) until you reach the height of the clean out door. You'll have to cut an opening for this door in one of the chimney blocks.
6. Lay a full chimney block above the clean out door.
7. Lay some pieces of re-rod or spike nails across the opening of this chimney block. These steel rods are going to hold the clay flue. Place the first clay flue pipe on these rods.
8. Lay chimney blocks and clay flue pipe to the height where the indoor stovepipe is going to enter the chimney. I stuffed pink fiberglass insulation between the clay flue and chimeny block so the flue doesn't wobble.
9. My suggestion is to use a manufactured chimney thimble thru the home's wall and a section of Metalbestos to go thru the home's wall and into the concrete chimney. Here again, you'll have to cut a chimney block or two...as well as clay flue...to accept the stovepipe from the home.
10. Continue to lay block and clay flue to the appropriate height. Remember to use metal flashing where it goes thru the eaves and roof. IMHO, copper or aluminum flashing is best. The flashing is placed into the mud between the appropriate chimney blocks.
11. The last section of clay flue should be cut so it extends past the last chimney block by about 4 to 6". With your mortar, make a tapered cap on top of the last section of chimney block to shed rain. Use chicken wire inside this mortar for strength.

I know I've probably forgotten a few important points. As others have mentioned, do not lay too many chimney blocks at a time because the mortar has to set up first. If you lay too many, the mortar will be squeezed out from the weight above.

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  #7  
Old 09/21/08, 06:46 PM
 
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Also check to see what size flue your particular stove requires.

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  #8  
Old 09/21/08, 07:34 PM
 
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Oh wow - I am overwhelmed already. I better call and get estimates for some help plus check out the metal ones at Lowe's. It sounds like the children and I might not be able to do this one.......but we will think on it.

Thank you very much everyone.

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  #9  
Old 09/21/08, 09:20 PM
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I helped a mason build mine and never again will I hoist one more block up a scaffolding. I've assembled dozens of metal chimneys they are far far easier and if they aren't cheaper in cost (which I wonder) they are in time saved!

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  #10  
Old 09/22/08, 05:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meanwhile View Post
Oh wow - I am overwhelmed already. I better call and get estimates for some help plus check out the metal ones at Lowe's. It sounds like the children and I might not be able to do this one.......but we will think on it.

Thank you very much everyone.
Get the metal somewhere besides lowes or homedepot. It will be cheaper that way. Your best bet would be to have a local hardware store order it. It comes in three ft sections and will be about 100.00 a section.

If your woodstove has a catalyst in it it will require a certan chimney height to function properly; usually about 16 ft of chimney above the exhaust of the stove. Otherwise it needs to be 2-3 ft above the peak of your house.
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  #11  
Old 09/23/08, 04:51 PM
 
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Thank you - the chimney cleaner (man) said he will help me find a better price too. Also a neighbor said she knows someone who sells Copperfield products. I have not heard of Copperfield but she said they have good metal chimney's parts.

Thank you

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  #12  
Old 09/23/08, 06:39 PM
 
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Location: Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meanwhile View Post
Thank you - the chimney cleaner (man) said he will help me find a better price too. Also a neighbor said she knows someone who sells Copperfield products. I have not heard of Copperfield but she said they have good metal chimney's parts.

Thank you

.........Look under "David" , lol......... ,. fordy
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  #13  
Old 09/24/08, 02:13 AM
 
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OK - funny! Took me a minute to "get it" but now ....funny. I needed a laugh at this hour.

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  #14  
Old 09/24/08, 09:53 AM
 
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remember too that your insurance company will come by sometime to inspect it.....you need to tell them your going to put in a wood stove. If you don't it could get you in trouble.

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  #15  
Old 09/24/08, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farmerscotty View Post
remember too that your insurance company will come by sometime to inspect it.....you need to tell them your going to put in a wood stove. If you don't it could get you in trouble.
YES!!! Like if you don't tell them that you have wood heat and they don't inspect it and your house burns down; they do not have to cover it.

We had to change insurance companies when we put our chimney in because the old company would not insure a home heated with wood.
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  #16  
Old 09/24/08, 02:57 PM
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A rule of thumb when estimating the height any chimney needs to extend above a house is laying a level on it's top and pointing it towards the roof. The distance from the chimney to the roof needs to be a straight line at least 12' when the chimney is two feet out of the shingles. If you can't obtain your 2/12 ratio, just keep building upwards. Some steep rooves require quite a tall chimney where a gentle sloped roof like a 4/12 pitch doesn't require that much.

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