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  #1  
Old 08/04/08, 03:41 AM
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Western North Carolina
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Creative ways to mark property lines?

After a long standing dispute with one neighbor over location of property lines, three of us have decided to share the costs for professional Surveyor to mark the lines. The Surveyor has told us he will mark the lines using re-bar spray painted orange plus use orange tape to hang along the route in trees.
He also told us it was legal for us to add as much re-bar as we like, along the path he will show us.

We already know of at least seven "corner" spots we would like to place a more permanent marker of some type, to clearly "mark the spot" and use something that will be difficult, if not impossible, to move.

Ideas we have so far:
-One idea was to use three old tires, stack them and then fill with rock. Spray paint if desired.
-Another idea is to use taller re-bar, hammer into ground, then top with a tube of PVC pipe. Spray paint if desired.
-Use stacked tires, fill up the insides with "great stuff" foam to hold in place, plus stick a long re-bar in the middle.

We do not want to create anything terribly "ugly" .......so the idea was rejected to place old toilets along the property lines.........although it was tempting........

Any other creative ways to mark the property corners? Thank you.

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  #2  
Old 08/04/08, 04:16 AM
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Location: Northern Michigan (U.P.)
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I heard of an old surveyer that carried a pouch of Iris tubers. When in remote areas, he'd plant the flowers next to the stake. They live for ever and are easy to spot.

Drill a post hole, pound in a chunk of re-rod and pour in some concrete right up to ground level, with a foot of re-rod sticking out. Very difficult to pull that out of the ground.

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  #3  
Old 08/04/08, 06:57 AM
 
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Pound a good length of rebar in the ground with about 11/2 to 2 foot sticking above ground. Then cement a pile of rocks around it.

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  #4  
Old 08/04/08, 07:14 AM
Alice In TX/MO's Avatar
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If you have native rock, you can also make a column/tube of wire fencing material, then fill it with rocks.

I'd do more than one thing.

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  #5  
Old 08/04/08, 07:32 AM
 
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Location: NC/Blue Ridge foothills
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Treated wooden posts standing tall look fine.

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  #6  
Old 08/04/08, 07:50 AM
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Not sure about your spot but we put birdhouses on the corners of a property we used to own. You can cement a nice post in place and attach the house.

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  #7  
Old 08/04/08, 08:08 AM
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: South central Virgina
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If everyone has agreed to try and mark it exactly where the surveyor says it is, Get together and order a few hundred spruce pine trees or what ever you prefer that doesn't miz in with whats already there. Rent a 2 man post hole digger or even a small back hoe for a day and plant them every 20-30' apart.
Gets the job done and looks great also.

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  #8  
Old 08/04/08, 08:10 AM
 
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What ever you use, have something protruding not less than 4 feet. In so doing the undergrowth will never obscure the marker and a brush/tractor should never run over and destroy the reference. I place "my marker" on my side of the surveyors pin to avoid a further confrontation with a difficult adjacent landowner. If he should then attempt to remove my pin he is trespassing. There is a code for painting property lines and I would also paint "my Marker" accordingly.

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  #9  
Old 08/04/08, 08:59 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Customary property lines marked on trees with paint in this area follow a simple rule. Choose a tree closest to the property line, (within 1 or 2 ft.) on your side. Mark the tree with two horizontal lines if seen from the adjacent property, then on the other side paint one horizontal line if seen from your property. So, 2 lines seen if someone is coming onto your property, one line seen if someone is going off your property. Works pretty good, doesn't have to be exactly on the line, and is generally understood by most folks.

Corner markers could be anything as described as above. Something tall would be good, but it does need to be identified as a boundary / corner marker in some fashion.

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  #10  
Old 08/04/08, 09:11 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
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I like "T" posts, with a milk jug fastened to the top securely.

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  #11  
Old 08/04/08, 09:15 AM
 
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The coding used on trees is not uniform in the whole country. Therefore I did not list the methods. Research for where you live. What is consistent for good marking practice is to take a draw knife and remove the top bark area containing the rough bark only. Then using the best acrylic house paint apply one coat, now make the pass around the property line a second time an apply a top coat. This will last for not less than 15 years.

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  #12  
Old 08/04/08, 09:26 AM
 
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Location: North Central PA
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Our property is marked with tposts on the corners and the survey pins in the back. We went along and added 4' rebar and spray painted them orange at the pins only markers.

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  #13  
Old 08/04/08, 10:01 AM
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I dug a deep hole with a post hole digger .I found some old SOLID steel rods at the scrap yard . 7'long 2" around. I pounced them in at the corners & left 3' sticking out. then I put 1 full 80 lb of sackcreat in the hole , then water & stirred it up . this set up & you will need a bull dosier to up root it . I like the idea of flowers & I WILL do this in the fall I have loads of bulbs.

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  #14  
Old 08/04/08, 10:03 AM
 
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pookiethebear, you need to follow some of the suggestions here. The tee post will last 20 years and the survey pins will last until someone wants to pull them up.

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  #15  
Old 08/04/08, 10:11 AM
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Just keep in mind, ONLY the surveyors marks will matter during any legal squabbles.

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  #16  
Old 08/04/08, 10:11 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: North Central PA
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you are probably right. I have 400' hedge 5' from the line down one side of my property, and a wild honeysuckle growing around one of the tposts. I think I like the concrete idea, but would prefer something we all could mow over, but then it would also get grown over in time if not taken care of....will have to think on it.

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  #17  
Old 08/04/08, 10:16 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Southside Virginia
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After disputing with neighbors, we hired a survey of our property, then put up a 4' woven wire fence with barbed on top all the way around, on the exact line. Of course we also used it for our pasture fence, but it serves as a good marker plus keeps out the fool hunters and their dogs. Two neighbors protested our fence and said we were over on them by many feet and they would make us move the fence. We said "show us by a survey" and soon after they had it surveyed and what do you know, the new survey tape followed our posts all the way around! They still disregard the fence at times. Twice they have knocked down a stretch by turning around their farm equipment and snagging the wire fencing with the back of their disk (neither times did they tell us, thank God the cows didn't find it!), and they still come on over it if their hunting dogs get in or if they see a turkey or deer they want. On 123 acres it's hard to "police" the whole thing. But my recommendation is to survey, then put up a permanent "pasture" type fence to mark the exact line. Don't put the fence on your prop a ways, or you're giving them that part of your land.

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  #18  
Old 08/04/08, 11:55 AM
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Hey.

Steel t-posts stay in place better than rebar. In some places the rebar is buried and you need a metal detector to find it. Put a pile of rock around the corner markers.

RF

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  #19  
Old 08/04/08, 01:16 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Western North Carolina
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Thank you everyone for the ideas. We are armed and ready for tomorrow's Survey Party. The neighbors who have agreed to help pay for the Survey and my sons have all planned for a Party to help make the event more pleasant (even though it will be 94 - 96 here tomorrow....). We have re-bar, PVC pipes and caps, all sorts of spray paint, orange plastic tape, caps for the re-bar, and more spray paint and the first of a load of used tired to fill up with rocks, dirt and cement!

We plan to take photos all along the way, as the Survey man makes his marks, then put the re-bar or PVC in place........and the tires and rocks at corner places......and we are also going to take video too.

The neighbor who complains about the lines does not live here full-time and our plan is to have the lines marked, then send her photos and a statement from the Survey Company. She has NOT been invited to the "Survey Party"!

I like the idea of the T-Posts too.......we will have to pick some up later in week.

Thanks!

PS: don't try to fill up a tire with "great stuff" since one whole can will not even fill half a tire! We were trying to find a light weight way to fill the tire holes......but that won't work......I think we will just put them in place and worry about the rats/mice/wasps later.

Thanks!

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  #20  
Old 08/04/08, 01:50 PM
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We used tposts as well, and put 10 foot long white pvc pipes over them. Sure makes it easy to see where the line is on our very wooded, uneven ground.

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  #21  
Old 08/04/08, 02:09 PM
 
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Location: NC/Blue Ridge foothills
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"Thank you everyone for the ideas. We are armed and ready for tomorrow's Survey Party."

If tomorrow is the first visit by the survey crew to the site, they may not be marking anything. Depending on the size and scope of the project and whether or not the licensed surveyor is very familiar with the neighborhood, the first visit to the site by the survey crew may involve mere looking around and possibly taking preliminary random measurements which may need to be analyzed back at the office so that on a return trip to the site the survey crew can actually mark corners and lines.

FWIW, I'm a self-employed licensed land surveyor in WNC.

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  #22  
Old 08/04/08, 02:10 PM
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I set round metal fence posts in at the corners. Concreted in, too. Around here the usual survey pins are either railroad spikes or a bit of rebar set in concrete and only stick up maybe 3" above ground. They are really hard to find so once I found them I planted a post alongside them on my side of the pin. If I had a surveyor along to authorize the posts, I would have set the posts directly on the property line corners. For putting up fences, I like to put them 1" inside the line on my side just so nobody else can have any say over the matter.

I know of some folks who had trees planted on the property lines. Now half the tree is on the neighbor's lot and half the tree is on their side so there is some dispute over if the tree should come down or if a branch falls and damages something who's tree it is. If I were planting trees, I'd plant them so when they were full grown they would not have their trunk in the neighbor's yard. I'd also plant fruit trees or something I could eat and put them far enough back that they wouldn't be in the neighbor's yard, but that's just me.

Oh, if using something to mark your property line, if it is metal spikes in the ground, they can be found later with a metal detector. PVC doesn't work for metal detectors. Metal spikes are also low enough to mow over if you mow the area.

(Hey, Kabri - nice dog!)

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  #23  
Old 08/04/08, 02:36 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Western North Carolina
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Hillsidedigger: Hello neighbor! You are close to us I bet. We are down in Saluda section of Polk County. Yes, the area has been Surveyed before. In fact, everyone out here already has plats / deeds / maps and more maps. The properties (four owners now) were part of one huge family owned tract. In the mid 1900's, they began to chop it up and according to local history (from the locals we have met and from two former owners) the property lines in question have been the topic of hot dispute for years. I am pretty sure I know where the lines are and when I called the Survey Company, he said he knows where they are too and that re-bar was put down before......at least twice!

Some re-bar is in place......in two spots and I for one (two other owners agree) believe those four re-bars to be in the correct places. One owner disagrees and he/she has been so annoying.......to now obnoxious........about it (telling the rest of us to move shrubs, not to landscape, not to maintain one driveway, that they plan to fill in two drain ditches, not to allow the children to hike in one section......and worst of all.....that we should not make use of the main Creek on the land)......that it is best to have the survey done and marked.

We cannot find re-bar in seven other places even though, when we first moved here we did find it.......someone has removed the re-bar! Be that as it may ........tomorrow we will have fresh re-bar and can mark it with more re-bar, Tpost, tires and cement.

We also plan to take digital photos and video all along the way, provide the Contrary Property Owner with copies and then move on with our lives, projects including planting more camellias right where I want to plant them!

Thank you again everyone for the ideas! Will let you know how it goes tomorrow.

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  #24  
Old 08/04/08, 06:14 PM
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We lived in Texas for a time, and the rebar corner markers were a joke (when every self-respecting cattleman had a front-end loader and a chain and could just pull them up at will).

CEMENT and alot of it, deep, is the only way to PROVE your marker was moved.....

Good Luck!!

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  #25  
Old 08/04/08, 06:59 PM
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stone fenceposts

from Kansas...love 'em!

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  #26  
Old 08/04/08, 07:55 PM
 
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Location: Coolidge AZ
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At our desert place we have the trail in marked w tires that are stacked and filled w rock and sand. It has been marked like that for about 10 yrs now and has lasted through several flashfloods. Folks around there call that wash 3 Tire Trail now.

The corner markers of 10' lengths of PVC were there when we bought the place. They are placed over T posts. We did cap the tops of them after I removed one from it's post and found the mummified remains of a bird that had fallen down in the pipe and couldn't get out.

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  #27  
Old 08/04/08, 08:16 PM
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Galvanized culvert pipe, 24-36" tall, buried 1 foot (or deeper depending on freeze level) filled with concrete. Hard to miss and hard to move.

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  #28  
Old 08/05/08, 10:57 AM
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When I was a kid we had property corners marked with 4-6" pipe (I just remember they were big!) that were buried in concrete and filled with concrete. Stood about 6ft tall and were painted bright yellow. There was no missing where our property line was. Visited the old place a few years ago, and the yellow has faded a bit, but there still is no way anyone can miss those corners!

If you were concerned about the entire line, you could place one of those type of posts at the corners and then one every 50-100 ft depending on topography.

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  #29  
Old 08/05/08, 11:31 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wisconsin
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Good fences make good neighbors!

I have experience the irons being dug up because they didn't want to deal with the truth. Over $1,000 to have the irons put back in. Felony offense in Wisconsin. Law made be on your side but that does not mean they will in force the law.

Put the fence sametime you pay for the survey. Very hard to pull up a fence and not have it noticed. Any thing else can be moved, removed or destroyed. Even a single strand of barb wire on T-post is better than some homemade markers that are not legally recognized by laws. Fences are recognized by laws, police and the DA. Move or destroy a fence and people take notice. Move or destroy markers and it's just a simple civil dispute involving lawers not the police or DA.

PUT UP A FENCE!

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  #30  
Old 08/05/08, 03:40 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wisconsin
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Here the kind of fence to use with some neighbors

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080804/...zkTnyIf9as0NUE

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