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  #1  
Old 03/23/07, 09:14 PM
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: TN
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Yanmar tractor ?

Was thinking about getting one of the smaller (18 to 20 HP) Yanmar 2 WD tractors. Anyone have any experience with them or can make a comment on any pros / cons ?
Thanks

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  #2  
Old 03/23/07, 09:40 PM
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I've not actually used the tractors, but am familiar with the engines in marine applications. I'd not have any problem owing the motors. They are quality stuff.
I know one couple that have a yanmar diesel in their trawler and it has hundreds of trouble free hours on it.

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  #3  
Old 03/23/07, 10:16 PM
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I hope I posted these pics. the right way.
I have a 17HP Yanmar, a 4' bush hog, a post hole digger and a 6' rock rake.
The tractor is a work horse with about 750 hours on it, but it is too light to move a round bale, that is my only complaint with it! I have been cutting and dragging lots of trees the last few weeks w/o troubles. The bigger trees I drag in reverse so the front end stays down. This has been a great tractor for me so far, I paid about $2,500 for it 3 years ago no regrets so far. I did have to get the starter rebuilt at a cost of $125 ouch~ one other thing that I like is that it is a diesel and I never have to put fuel in it..... well almost never!
PS it is hard to start in the winter, I need a block warmer.
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  #4  
Old 03/23/07, 11:40 PM
MWG MWG is offline
 
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Location: Lincolnton NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy Dandy
Was thinking about getting one of the smaller (18 to 20 HP) Yanmar 2 WD tractors. Anyone have any experience with them or can make a comment on any pros / cons ?
Thanks
I used to own a 1700, won't ever own one again. I liked the tractor, but they are really hard to get parts for and if you can find them they are expensive. I didn't like not have ROPS and it didn't handle well with a front end loader. I couldn't really pull a plow or box blade with it either.

I guess it depends on what you want to do with it... bush hogged well with a 4 foot and it did well with a hay rake. Boom pole worked well too.
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  #5  
Old 03/23/07, 11:54 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: MN
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I have no personal experience, but they seem to be pretty good machines.

JD has that company make some drivetrains for JD - but that doesn't mean all Yanmars are the equal of any JD compact tractor. Can be built to different specs! But in general Yanmar has a good power train on all their tractors; certainly better than anything out of China.

Many Yanmars are grey market - means they are sold as used Japaneese tractors. They will not have all the USA safety & standard specs as USA tractors, and if they don't cross over to a regular USA model they may be much harder to find parts for. If you depend on this tractor, that can be a problem. If you can get by for a month or 6 weeks while searching for grey market parts, no biggie.


2wd is a bit of a deal. Real poor if you want a loader on it. Even kinda poor for general work. These little tractors have more power than weight, & will spin out on you. A 4wd of this size is better.

But of course, 4wd costs more, & there are more expensive things now that can break on it....

So, which way to go?????

--->Paul

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  #6  
Old 03/24/07, 12:24 AM
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I had a friend who bought one. We spent more time working on it that using it. The parts were hard to find and very expensive. It was a diesel and always sounded like it was falling apart. We pulled a finishing mower behind it but it had a tendency to overheat a lot.

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  #7  
Old 03/24/07, 05:24 AM
 
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Sounds pretty good for the most part. Ive heard from a few by word of mouth that these are pretty good little tractors. I wouldnt be doing a lot of heavy work with it really. Maybe a 4 foot box blade, 4 foot bushhog, and a garden tiller. Sounds like I might want to load the tires with fluid though. Thanks for all the great information.

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  #8  
Old 03/24/07, 05:41 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Michigan
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The motor is usually A+, the rest of the tractor is hit & miss with parts being very expensive. Re-sale value is less than other brands because of this. The box blade, if correctly used, would prefer four wheel drive along with a "Top-N-Tilt" on the three point (which requires more SCV's which are cheaper at the point of purchase).

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  #9  
Old 03/24/07, 06:11 AM
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Location: GA & Ala
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I have a Yanmar 2000, danged thing runs great, starts quickly, has NEVER broken down and I use it to:

Scrape the driveway
bushhog 55 acres of pasture once a month from April through end of October
spread fertilizer
spread lime
plant seeds
haul logs out of the woods when I don't feel like hooking up the horse
add additional weights and attach hay pole and move round bales of hay
plow up garden
rototill garden
spread gravel

and just about anything else I can think of.

You can get parts easily if you know who to call - we get parts (when needed and that has only been once three years ago at Frederick's Tractors in Alabama - they have a website and are fast and reasonably priced). I also have a manual for my tractor, and the only problem I had with it was not precisely the tractor, but more my mom's hired help..they replaced the antifreeze with water during the summer and did not replace the antifreeze for winter..yep, frozen busted block and water pump..got that rebuilt, now said tractor stays at my farm all winter and I don't trust the "hired" help to do more than sit on it and cut the grass.

I do have a finishing mower that makes grass cutting easy and also a large bushhog and other various implements.

Can't say I can complain about this tractor - it gets used nearly every day for something or another and other than the above, I have never had a problem with it. I paid 3,000 for it and then bought implements along paying cash as I had it available.

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  #10  
Old 03/24/07, 09:31 AM
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Location: Jones Co, Texas
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I own the 1500D, which is a grey market, 4x4.

A few notes:

If you are comfortable with working on your own stuff, then the Yanmar is not bad. I have not had to work on anything bad yet, but I do not have any dealer support, so I know that one day I will.

If possible, get the 4x4, it gives you much more tractor for the money, with either 2wd or 4wd you will run out of traction long before you run out of power. Check on getting the tires loaded, or at least some front weights. I cannot pick up a round bale with my little tractor, but I can roll on on the ground with my rake.

They are little work horses: Before:


After


Eight foot tall pile of dirt, to flat ground, without a front end loader.

Parts are getting easier to find, both for the gray market yanmars, and the others. hoye tractor has interactive part menus for most of the yanmars now, you just click on the part of the tractor, find the part you are looking for, and click on it for name and price. They also have books in english for most of the gray market tractors. If you buy a yanmar, buy a book! Also check out tractorbynet.com for info. Those forums are filled with yuppies that don't have a clue about homesteading, but some good tractor info.

They are tiny, but usually good tractors.
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  #11  
Old 03/25/07, 05:35 AM
 
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Thanks for all the help. Also all the pictures are great. Im going to be checking out these tractors for the next month or so. I think I might be getting one as I believe it will do what I need it to just fine.

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  #12  
Old 03/25/07, 05:54 AM
 
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Just curious....why not buy a used Farmall....like a model H or M ??? Parts are very common, and easy to work on. Attachments are cheap and easy to find. Good resale value if you ever wanted to sell...I bet you would be able to sell it for what you paid, less improvements/repairs.
Clove

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  #13  
Old 03/25/07, 08:22 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Iowa
Posts: 280

I cannot comment on Yanmar, but I agree with the above post about Farmalls.

If you can find one for sale by an owner who has been diligent with maintenance, they are a fantastic value.

Here in Iowa, it is not uncommon to find a one-owner Farmall who is selling due to retirement.

That's how I got my 400, $1700 bucks and parts are everywhere. You can still get OEM new parts and accessories. No ROPS however, but power steering, live hydraulics 5 gears (plus 5 more if the torque amplifier works) and 50 horses at the drawbar.

A few months after buying the tractor I found a seller with a two piston 3-point for $400 and last week I was able to buy a front end loader for --not a typo -- $50. It was a St. Patrick's Day miracle.

I've owned the tractor for a year and had to replace the solenoid on the starter, a fuse on the dash panel, and change the oil.

Great machine. As an added note, I must say I also own a 1952 1 ton International pickup (International=Farmall). She's tired, but is the toughest(and one of the most reliable) machines I've ever owned. After all these years, you can still put 6000+ pounds in the bed and she'll climb 100 foot hills without complaining.

Old farmers come up to me when I get out of the truck and are compelled to tell me stories about the International they owned and how they used them to pull buildings on skids uphill, pull down trees and cars out of ditches.

I bought it 6 years ago and have changed fluids, plugs, wires, all new brake system, battery and rear axle seals, which, when you think about it, is practically nothing given the age of the vehicle.

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  #14  
Old 03/26/07, 08:36 AM
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Ditto on Tractobynet. Yanny greys are either Vietnam rebuilds which can be a nightmare or a good buy, or refurbished here by reputable dealers. At TBN you can find out which models are good and which are not so good in parts availability.

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  #15  
Old 03/26/07, 12:56 PM
 
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I did an ebay search for "Yanmar"...about 106 listings total. I did the same for "Farmall"....about 1600 listings.

Our local auto parts store even stocks parts for Farmalls....at least the common stuff. Belts, hoses, distibutor caps, plugs, wires, alternator/generator, 6 and 12 volt batteries, carb rebuild kits, gaskets, etc....all the stuff that could get you working with your tractor in the same day if you needed it.

I personally, would rather be looking for a standard size replacement bolt for a Farmall than some weird metric bolt that may or may not fit once I get the thing home. (You know how the Asian manufacturers like to swap parts, bolts and fittings on the same model run. I once owned a car that had a import front end.....needed a castle nut with fine, reversed metric threads....try finding that thing in Central Indiana!)

Just my 10 cents....
Clove

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  #16  
Old 03/26/07, 02:20 PM
 
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Lots of folks around here have bought Yanmars and had very good luck with them. They once made engines for JD tractors, but I don't think they do so any longer. As noted above, and if your budget permits, I'd get a 4x4. It just makes a small tractor much more functional (and seemingly much more powerful). I thnk 4x4 is a great option for most any size tractor actually.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do.

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  #17  
Old 03/26/07, 03:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramblin Wreck
Lots of folks around here have bought Yanmars and had very good luck with them. They once made engines for JD tractors, but I don't think they do so any longer. As noted above, and if your budget permits, I'd get a 4x4. It just makes a small tractor much more functional (and seemingly much more powerful). I thnk 4x4 is a great option for most any size tractor actually.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do.
They still make the smaller JD stuff. Check out Deere's website, they list the subs for all their tractors where applicable.
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  #18  
Old 03/26/07, 09:42 PM
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Farmall would be a good choice as well. Probably better than any of the older fords, just because every homesteader has been told to get a ford 8N, and has driven the prices up. The main thing about a farmall, is trying to find one that is four wheel drive. For what I do with my tractor out in my sandy land a two wheel drive just would not hack it.

As for the ebay thing, up until recently if you had searched your results would have been zero for "yanmar" on ebay, as that the American side of the company was trying to destory the grey market trade. Didn't work.

As for parts, they are getting easier to get everyday. No, for most things it is not just a trip down to NAPA, like for an ancient ford or farmall. For sure, that is something to take into consideration, but on the most part, Yanmars are solid, dependable tractors that might not need the daily pampering something 50 plus years old might need. Whether you buy a gray market tractor, or an some old American iron, you need to be comfortable turning a wrench.


Quote:
Originally Posted by clovis
I did an ebay search for "Yanmar"...about 106 listings total. I did the same for "Farmall"....about 1600 listings.

Our local auto parts store even stocks parts for Farmalls....at least the common stuff. Belts, hoses, distibutor caps, plugs, wires, alternator/generator, 6 and 12 volt batteries, carb rebuild kits, gaskets, etc....all the stuff that could get you working with your tractor in the same day if you needed it.

I personally, would rather be looking for a standard size replacement bolt for a Farmall than some weird metric bolt that may or may not fit once I get the thing home. (You know how the Asian manufacturers like to swap parts, bolts and fittings on the same model run. I once owned a car that had a import front end.....needed a castle nut with fine, reversed metric threads....try finding that thing in Central Indiana!)

Just my 10 cents....
Clove
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  #19  
Old 03/27/07, 08:50 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
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Red face

I run the old Farmalls...Super A,Super C, Super H. I am looking at a yanmar now too. Depending on what you want to do the Farmalls are either good or bad. They are too fast to rototill. The smaller ones have a weak front end. If you wanr a front end loader the spindles can beak. The larger ones have poor turning radius with a wide front end. Id you are planning to "farm" they canwork well for you. If you are going more towards intensive large scale gardening, not so good. I have been "farming"...Plowing, disking, planting, mowing, bailing, harvesting, etc for a few decades with them. Don't even want to think about any other tractor. But now I am also into several acres of crops and strawberries for a road stand and need something that can rototill small areas for later plantings. The job you want to do dictates the machine to get. Just so you know, I got my first tractor in highschool,25 years ago. It was the Super H. I had to replace the electrical wires and brake disks the first year. Total cost including purchase...$700. Other than oil and gas, I havent had to put another penny into the old gal. Overloaded with bailer, kicker and wagon all summer long. Overworked with a 12 ft disk all spring. Original engineand clutch. That is how to make money farming. Mike

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  #20  
Old 03/27/07, 09:01 AM
 
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Location: Willamette Valley, Or
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramblin Wreck
Lots of folks around here have bought Yanmars and had very good luck with them. They once made engines for JD tractors, but I don't think they do so any longer. As noted above, and if your budget permits, I'd get a 4x4. It just makes a small tractor much more functional (and seemingly much more powerful). I thnk 4x4 is a great option for most any size tractor actually.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do.
Ditto on 4WD. It effectively gives you 50% more HP, because you are putting more HP into the ground. Traction is a big deal for getting work done.

My 62hp 4WD Ford will pull as much as a friends 90hp 2wd JD.
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