Does anyone buy firewood in 8' logs delivered on a semi? - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 03/13/07, 10:51 AM
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Does anyone buy firewood in 8' logs delivered on a semi?

How much do you Pay? I get a semi load that is 20 pulp cord, some people might call it a full cord, for $1200. WHat I call a pulp cord is a pile of 8' logs 4' x 4'.

WIth heating, and maple syrup I go through about 15 pulp cord per year.

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Old 03/13/07, 11:09 AM
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That works out to about $60 per cord (full)?
Around here a face cord delivered is $65 on the low end, sounds like a deal to me.

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Old 03/13/07, 11:15 AM
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I used to get that in 12 cord loads delivered 2 years ago at $650 a load. It's gone up, but not sure by how much since then.

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Old 03/13/07, 11:18 AM
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I did this once a long time ago and will never do it again. The logs I received were skidded through mud, sand and gravel. I had to wash each log so I could cut them with the chainsaw without ruining the chain. The chain still dulled after ever 3 or 4 cuts. There was no way I could wash the logs clean enough to get all the soil out of the bark so my chain would last. Like I said, I will never do this again.

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  #5  
Old 03/13/07, 11:28 AM
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I buy from a straight truck, holds from 8 to 10 cords. Loads with all big logs also have large openings in between. Loads with small stuff doesn't make as much either. A mix of large and small is best. Alot depends on what varieties you get. Oak, maple, ash and yellow birch produce a lot of heat. Soft maple, Red Maple, white birch, Aspen, Poplar, Pople, Basswood, Balsum produce less and are therefore less valuable.
If you can sell a face cord, 4 feet high, 8 feet long and 16 to 18 inch lengths, split and delivered for $60., you'll only be able to pay $75 to 80 per pulp cord.
The trucks that I see hauling 20 cords are either tandum trailers, 12 cord on the front and 8 on the back (pup) trailer. Sometimes a straight truck can get 10 cords on and pull a big trailer behind. 20 pulp cords would make a stack 8 feet tall, 8 feet long logs and 40 feet wide. There are 40 feet long log trucks, but if you have the self unloader boom, you wouldn't be able to stack it 8 feet tall. You should be able to get about 2.7 face cords per pulp cord. Mathmaticly it is 3 face cords, but cut and split wood stacks tighter than in the round 8 feet lengths.
Sounds like a good deal, but be sure to tape measure the load on the truck to be sure you are geting a full 20 cords.
If it is good hard species, get two semi loads. That'll make you about 100 face cords. Keep 30 for yourself, two years worth, sell 70 cord at $65, collect the $4550 and you'll have enough profit to pay your taxes ($2150). Go for it.

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  #6  
Old 03/13/07, 11:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabin Fever
I did this once a long time ago and will never do it again. The logs I received were skidded through mud, sand and gravel. I had to wash each log so I could cut them with the chainsaw without ruining the chain. The chain still dulled after ever 3 or 4 cuts. There was no way I could wash the logs clean enough to get all the soil out of the bark so my chain would last. Like I said, I will never do this again.
I hear ya. We get a little like that too. The guy we buy from makes a good effort to keep the logs clean. He does a pretty good job.
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  #7  
Old 03/13/07, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michiganfarmer
I hear ya. We get a little like that too. The guy we buy from makes a good effort to keep the logs clean. He does a pretty good job.
The logs that were delivered to me were mostly ash with some mixed maple or birch. Seemed the birch sometimes were the dirtiest, and not sure why. Most of the wood my logger delivered were winter cut, which usually meant over snow covered ground and cut with a feller buncher, directly loaded to the hauling truck. That kept almost all the wood quite clean.
The worst wood I ever got which dulled my chainsaw blades something fierce was the slabs. They were a mess. I'll never bother with those again.
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Old 03/13/07, 12:12 PM
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With the Emerald Ash Borer killing ash trees in Michigan (20 million and growing) you might be careful about getting any ash brought out to your property.

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  #9  
Old 03/13/07, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by haypoint
With the Emerald Ash Borer killing ash trees in Michigan (20 million and growing) you might be careful about getting any ash brought out to your property.
I dont have any ash on my place anyway. Maple, elm, iron wood, beech, bass, and a little cherry
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  #10  
Old 03/13/07, 12:26 PM
 
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I purchased this load of wood from a logger friend of mine. 12 long cords @$65/cord.
He screwed me pretty bad as I wound up with 4 face cords of junk wood (aspen and punky soft maple) that were completely unsellable.
There are lots of people around here with outdoor wood burners. One has a better chance of seeing peace between the Jews & Palestinians than they have of getting even $10 a truckload from the tightwads with the outdoor wood burners.
Its more or less understood that species such as aspen (popple) have no place whatsoever in a firewood pile. Aspen is complete junk wood for burning in Northern Wisconsin as is just plains burns too quickly.
Slightly over 1/3 of the truckload was red oak, maybe another 1/3 was soft maple (junk wood, but nowhere near as horrible as aspen) and the remainder was sugar maple, birch and aspen.

The best time to purchase 8' length firewood is in the dead of winter. Sap content is at its lowest and with snow cover on the ground, mud on the logs is never a problem.

I sell a bit of firewood. Have for decades. A person generally will get 22 - 23 face cords (16" length x 48" heighth x 96" length) out of a long cord 4' x 4' x 8'.
Theoretically, one should get 30 face cords out of 10 full cords, but due to taper of the logs, crooked logs, air gaps, etc......22 - 23 face cords is what you'll wind up with.
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Old 03/13/07, 01:58 PM
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I've done that a couple of times, around $1400 load. One of the loads had so many good logs that I used it to put an addition on my cabin. The other was not so hot. Rotten, hollow logs mixed with good ones. Gave the bad ones to my friend with a wood burning furnace.

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  #12  
Old 03/13/07, 02:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by idahodave
I've done that a couple of times, around $1400 load. One of the loads had so many good logs that I used it to put an addition on my cabin. .
lol, thats a good idea. I like to see people use what they can get their hands on. I want to build a pole barn this summer. I plan on using iron wood from my woods for the poles, the ridge beam, and rafters.
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  #13  
Old 03/13/07, 02:09 PM
 
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Just to chime in on prices: a cord of solid hickory or solid oak here, cut, split and delivered to the place, is $100. You know, I can't justify my time in cutting it myself for that price; I can make more money letting someone else do it, helping him with his need for cashflow, and using my time more productively as far as my own cash flow.

For the first 3 years here, I was cutting all my own wood. Man, it felt good, I was in my 30s then, and man, I was being self-sufficient! Then one time I stopped to calculate the hours spent cutting, splitting, hauling and stacking. Been buying ever since. In the early fall I just put an ad on the local radio swap show, and get 10-20 calls.

Shrug. Being Down South, our heating season is now over. We burned 3 1/2 cords this year total. What's left of my hickory woodpile will go into the smoker later on!

My buddy's got the best deal. He gets the scraps left from a local pallet factory, and burns them in his outdoor furnace. Big ugly chunks of oak. FREE!

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Last edited by Jim S.; 03/13/07 at 02:11 PM.
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  #14  
Old 03/13/07, 02:53 PM
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I used to sell firewood for a living here in central IL. There was always some fool from the government going on tv in the fall saying white oak has the best heating value dont buy anything but white oak. So you couldnty hardly sell anything but white oak to most of those city fools.
The truth of the matter is most of the people in the city with a fireplace would be a lot better off with cotton wood .....but you will never convince them of that,

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  #15  
Old 03/13/07, 02:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim S.
You know, I can't justify my time in cutting it myself for that price; I can make more money letting someone else do it, helping him with his need for cashflow, and using my time more productively as far as my own cash flow.
Its great that you can afford to buy it at $100 per face cord. I cant. I guess its a good thing that I enjoy cutting firewood,lol.
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Old 03/13/07, 03:09 PM
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We sell wood by the truck load - mostly sugar maple. It's generally $250 for the trucker plus about $250 more. It's about $50/cord.

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Old 03/13/07, 03:44 PM
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I just paid $1000 for 13.7 pulp cords, but it was 100% red oak.

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  #18  
Old 03/13/07, 08:10 PM
 
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At $100 a face cord you would be better off burning coal. No work, more heat, less dollars.

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Old 03/13/07, 11:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoop

Its more or less understood that species such as aspen (popple) have no place whatsoever in a firewood pile. Aspen is complete junk wood for burning in Northern Wisconsin as is just plains burns too quickly.
We burned popple all winter and we're pretty much as far north as they get in WI.

Ricki
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  #20  
Old 03/14/07, 04:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlands
We sell wood by the truck load - mostly sugar maple. It's generally $250 for the trucker plus about $250 more. It's about $50/cord.
you are cutting sugar maple? oh shame on you,lol
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