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  #1  
Old 10/28/06, 11:08 AM
 
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Location: Tip of the little finger MI
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Burning poplar

I have access to a bunch of poplar logs and I am wondering if the will burn well in our stove. I'd hate to leave it to rot if it is good wood but I don't want too go throug the trouble of getting it if it is not good for burning.

Vernie

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  #2  
Old 10/28/06, 11:14 AM
 
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We burn it if we lose a tree, but it is more like pine, hot but fast burning. it goes quick with not much in the way of hot embers.

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  #3  
Old 10/28/06, 11:37 AM
 
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P
oplar is great for quick hot fire on those days when you just want to warm up house.

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  #4  
Old 10/28/06, 11:58 AM
 
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Like others have said, it burns hot and fast (goffer wood). However, if you find that getting some woods like oak to burn, poplar is good to help get it going. Once oak is going it will burn ok.

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  #5  
Old 10/28/06, 12:27 PM
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It give a lot of ash also, and in my experience needs to stay under shelter to keep dry. It will wick up moisture like crazy if given the chance.

That said, I'd burn it. Why not?

Pete

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  #6  
Old 10/28/06, 01:01 PM
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I burn popular all the time, just chuck it into the stoves hopper and heat your house. Sure it's far from top, quality, but why just let it rot. Cuts quick with any chainsaw, drys out in less than a year and splits with ease. Tennessee John

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  #7  
Old 10/28/06, 01:27 PM
 
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I read somewhere that it can be burned green - actually burns better green.

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  #8  
Old 10/28/06, 01:46 PM
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Ok to burn Poplar (w/picture)

We used to burn Poplar until we got a good supply of Pine and Spruce, and some Beech (which is far hotter, and has better coals than Pine or Spruce.)

The problem we find with Poplar is the huge amount of ash. We can go three months with out emptying the ash drawer in our catalytic Blaze King if we burn Pine or Spruce, and it seems much hotter (even though the published heat content is not greater.)

If we burn Poplar, which we have a seemingly unlimited supply of (as we do of Pine and Spruce too,) ash must be removed every few days. Also, some people are sensitive to Poplar odor.

Technically, it gives just as much heat per cord as my beloved Pine and Spruce.

Burn baby burn, Poplar.

Alex


Windrows of Poplar near our place -- logging slash to be burned. These sources of wood, including Pine, Spruce, and some Beech are all over this logged Section, and free for the taking.

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Last edited by Alex; 10/28/06 at 01:48 PM.
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  #9  
Old 10/28/06, 01:55 PM
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for my outside wood stove, I like to burn green poplar mixed with dry ash. The burn rate is slower is what I find with this combination, with good heat. For indoor stove or furnace, I'd make sure the poplar was seasoned and dry, but you will go through more of it than you would a denser wood such as oak or ash.

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Old 10/28/06, 06:13 PM
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Dry poplar has the same BTUs as dry oak, pound for pound. That's a trick statement, it'll take a lot of pieces of dry poplar to equal the weight of a couple sticks of oak. I'd stay away from burning any green wood, better to control the burn with an air tight stove. Green wood consumes heat in order to drive the moisture out and the cooler combustion temperatures create a lot of cresote. As has been said in earlier posts, it is harder to keep a long lasting fire with dry poplar. I recommend you split it so it can dry properly. Keep it covered if you can. If not, just try to keep a weeks worth inside so the outside moisture has a chance to dry.

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  #11  
Old 10/28/06, 06:24 PM
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i wonder how the western poplars compare to the tulip poplar common on the east coast and the mid-west. isn't the poplar in the west actually a "true" poplar and related to aspen and the tulip poplar is actually a magnolia relative...or something like that?

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Old 10/28/06, 06:42 PM
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Tulip poplar is some of the wood I burn and yes it's related to the magnolia tree. I live in central Tennessee. Keep in mind that wood is my primary source of winter heat. I don't burn 100% poplar, it's always mixed in with oak, maple, hickory, sourwood and others. Poplar will heat your home you just need a lot of it ready to burn....Tennessee John

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  #13  
Old 10/28/06, 09:07 PM
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If you knew what poplar logs are bringing at the lumber mill, you wouldn't think of burning them.

Poplar is used as structural wood in furniture and is the preferred wood for face frames in cabinets.

Genebo
Paradise Farm

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Old 10/28/06, 09:55 PM
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i just got $.27 per board foot stumpage price. really, it should have been more as many were veneer grade.

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  #15  
Old 10/28/06, 10:20 PM
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the northern poplar is white poplar, aspen, or whatever you wanna call it. Not a magnolia at all.

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  #16  
Old 10/29/06, 07:11 AM
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Tulip poplar is also know as yellow poplar in my neck of the woods. It's a hardwood but with poor burn qualities. It is in the magnolia family. Happy Burning,,,, Tennessee John

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  #17  
Old 10/29/06, 08:10 AM
 
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i have an outside furnace and popple as we call it here burns as good as anything.but i notice it burns better if split and it burns to very fine ash instead of coals like maple or beech......mink

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  #18  
Old 10/29/06, 11:33 AM
 
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hey thanks all for the replys. One question, it was mentioned that I could/should sell the wood. What size do the logs have to be to sell them? I get mostly the trees that are already down and got some big logs sometimes. Looks like other than selling them there is no problem with burning them. That is good to know. Thanks all.

Vernie

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  #19  
Old 10/29/06, 12:54 PM
 
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38 degrees out right now and I am burning poplar (popple). Keep it dry and not rotting...great to use when the temps are mild or mixed with hardwoods.

Do not let it waste away...get the btu's into your house!

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  #20  
Old 10/29/06, 02:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by topside1
Tulip poplar is also know as yellow poplar in my neck of the woods. It's a hardwood but with poor burn qualities. It is in the magnolia family. Happy Burning,,,, Tennessee John
I have an old farmstead in New Brunwick, and the tree they call a poplar there is different from the tulip poplar we have in the South. I'm not sure how big the northern version grows, but I've never seen one equal in size to the tulip poplars I've cut on the farm in Georgia. I could have cut 30"x30" beams from some of those. Tulip poplar makes "OK" firewood, but like it's Northern neighbor, it's not the best. Tulip poplar makes exceptional lumber for many purposes.
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