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  #1  
Old 08/16/06, 10:48 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: South Central VA
Posts: 19
Question Building a Pole Barn, How Much??

Greetings!

I would like to build my own pole barn when I am done with my deployment. I was interested if anyone can give me an idea on much they paid per square foot for their barn.

Some specifics:

• I would do all of the construction.
• 46’ X 25’, 12/12 pitch gable roof.
• Cement slab foundation.
• Board and batten siding, rough cut green lumber.
• Most of the lumber would be rough cut from a local lumber mill.
• Sheet metal roof, aka ag-panel.
• Treated lumber posts and girts that are in contact with the ground.
• “Bare bones,” no plumbing or electricity.
• Loft would be decked with plywood or rough cut lumber.

If you built a barn similar to the one listed above, I am interested in how much you paid per square foot, or how much you paid for the major costs, like the slab foundation, rough cut lumber, and roofing material.

Thank you for your time and expert advice.

Tim

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  #2  
Old 08/16/06, 11:38 AM
WindowOrMirror's Avatar
..where do YOU look?
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: northcentral WI
Posts: 3,915
Located where?

without the slab, you'll go $12-18 a sq ft for materials... unless you get an ASTOUNDING deal.

Slab foundation... floating, located where? Entire thing slab or just a walkway?

Where you're located makes a large difference on the thickness (price) and reinforcement of the slab. It almost makes a difference for how deep you've got to set the poles.

For lumber and roofing... nothing fancy and that's you building the doors, I'd guess in the $12-16k range for "parts", plus the concrete and site preparation.

We paid $15k for "parts" for a 40x40 barn with an overhang... no loft, pre-made trusses with steel roof. The holes for the posts - we went 5' down, to get below the frost line even in "bad" winters. We had steel siding as well.

R

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Last edited by Red Devil; 08/16/06 at 11:41 AM.
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  #3  
Old 08/16/06, 12:34 PM
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Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 167

If you want to save a bunch, stick build your roof, trusses save alot of time and labor but last I priced, trusses were not a value if you have alot of time to do it yourself. You may find some on a deal but with the size you mentioned (25)'you'll have to custom order trusses. I sticked mine and saved around 400-500. If you ask most contrators they'll tell you build in 2's or 4's thats the way most framing material is bought and reduces scrap.

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  #4  
Old 08/16/06, 02:40 PM
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I love South Dakota
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 4,907

Is there a particular reason you want a 12/12 pitch roof? We just got done dealing with our 2 story section of the house with a 12/12 pitch roof. I would never put something that steep on anything without a really good reason. 6/12 is usually enough of a pitch for any snow issues.

If you want "head space" for the loft, maybe consider running the building a bit taller and putting the ceiling about 4' below the rafters.

My hubby and I built this barn ourselves (back in WI). Don't remember the cost, but we tried to keep it down. The floor to the upper section starts just above the door (10' height).

The other side is almost identical, so we could open it up and drive the tractor through.



We always laughed about that we hauled the entire barn (in peices of course) in our horse trailer.

Cathy

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  #5  
Old 08/16/06, 03:12 PM
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Posts: 167

Macybaby
I concur I would heighten the side walls and reduce the pitch it is just to steep to work with, some day repairs might be needed.

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  #6  
Old 08/16/06, 03:17 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
Posts: 8,172
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringtb
Greetings!

I would like to build my own pole barn when I am done with my deployment. I was interested if anyone can give me an idea on much they paid per square foot for their barn.

Some specifics:

• I would do all of the construction.
• 46’ X 25’, 12/12 pitch gable roof.
• Cement slab foundation.
• Board and batten siding, rough cut green lumber.
• Most of the lumber would be rough cut from a local lumber mill.
• Sheet metal roof, aka ag-panel.
• Treated lumber posts and girts that are in contact with the ground.
• “Bare bones,” no plumbing or electricity.
• Loft would be decked with plywood or rough cut lumber.

If you built a barn similar to the one listed above, I am interested in how much you paid per square foot, or how much you paid for the major costs, like the slab foundation, rough cut lumber, and roofing material.

Thank you for your time and expert advice.

Tim
....................A couple of suggestions...(1) either build(weld) some weld plates for each corner and the midpoint along each side of your slab . These are flat , steel plates maybe 8"x8" or 12"x12" and either 1\4" or 3\8"
thick . All you have to do is weld some 3\4 " thick steel rod about 12 " long to the Bottom of the plate then heat and bend them in the middle like an "L" , and maybe put 2 per plate . Then when you have the slab poured you set these plates flush on top of the wet concrete with the legs imbedded into the concrete . Then you can use I beams for truss supports for your pole barn . fordy...
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  #7  
Old 08/16/06, 03:30 PM
Who...me?
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Owen Co., Indiana
Posts: 278

I've been running these numbers for the last month since I'm going to be doing about the same thing. The materials package for a pole barn and a stick frame are almost the same.

Your savings in a pole barn are in the labor [when you're paying for it.]

There are half as many trusses in a pole barn, say 4' o.c., but they can only support sheet metal. Since sheet metal is almost three times what an asphalt roof would cost, it's pretty much a wash.

To stick frame 24' clear span, you have to go with 2 x 10' for the bottom chord ($30). A No.1 SYP - 2 x 10 will technically only span 23-1, but most inspectors will let it go 'cause so many garages are built that way with the stipulation that the attic space will not be used for storage (a loophole.) Trusses will easily go 24' with 2 x 4's. A 6/12 common residential truss will run you less than $50 each. A 24' 10/12 or 12/12 Gable in-room-attic truss will run you $120. $30 for a 2 x 10 plus the rafters, plus the 2 x 4 uprights...well, you can add it up if you think it will be less than $50 and probably a wash with your labor of building a room-in-attic roof. It's hard to compete in price with a truss.

You can save some with a slab floor over a full foundation unless you do haunches to the frost line. Then it's almost the same.

A pole barn will never add as much value to a property as a stick frame will. If you buy a $10k pole barn and put it up it will be worth maybe $12K - $14K. If you stick build the same for $10K it will be worth more like $25K - $30K.

My materials package for a 24 x 40 workshop, full foundation, concrete floor, two 9' garage doors, 16' x 24' in the back drywalled and insulated, plus electric and water line is about $9400-$9800 depending on a few misc. things. No money for excavation or any other labor. That's about $11 sq.ft.

I build these things in my CAD stick by stick, so I know exactly what each peice is, how long, how many, how much, etc. I'm in south central Indiana.

Around here we generally leave pole barn building to the amish.

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  #8  
Old 08/16/06, 05:41 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: WV
Posts: 523

Have you looked at this site?
We're gonna put one up next year. 28x40

http://www.socketsystems.com/

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  #9  
Old 08/17/06, 01:20 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: South Central VA
Posts: 19
This would be a floating slab. It would be about 5” thick and cover the entire floor area of the barn.



Tim
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  #10  
Old 08/17/06, 02:34 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: SW MO
Posts: 278

welcome soldier, glad you're planning for the future.

these folks have good ideas. just sit back and listen to them. one of them is bound to come up with an idea that fits you to a T.

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  #11  
Old 08/17/06, 06:40 AM
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Haney Family Sawmill
 
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Location: Woodbury,Tennessee
Posts: 964

I furnish lumber patterns for barns here in mid TN. For the lumber side of it I wuld charge .45 for the 2 by material and .50 cents for the 1 by.

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  #12  
Old 08/17/06, 08:14 AM
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Korea---but from Missouri
Posts: 829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highground
Have you looked at this site?
We're gonna put one up next year. 28x40

http://www.socketsystems.com/

I've seen that before. Looks scary to me and the timberframe guys on forestry forum didn't seem to like it too much either.
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  #13  
Old 08/17/06, 09:12 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 180

Why does one need a cement floor at all?

What are the pros and cons?

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  #14  
Old 08/17/06, 09:37 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: South Central VA
Posts: 19
Pros and Cons on a Cement Floor



Pros

Barn will be built on a 2% slope; I don’t want water in the barn.

I will have a chicken coop in the barn, easier to clean the barn/coop.

I will park my garden tractor and truck in the barn, easier to store and maintain the vehicles



Cons

Cost



Also, I neglected to pass in my original post; the barn will have 5 twenty-foot poles running down the center line of the barn. The joists will only span across 13 feet to a header joist bolted to the above poles.



Tim
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  #15  
Old 08/17/06, 10:24 AM
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Alaska
Posts: 4,527

I'd have to go measure but I think our is 24x32, maybe 32x40. Stick built by Mennonites, cement floor. Just under $10,000. Hard to see under the snow but the roof is metal.


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  #16  
Old 08/17/06, 12:36 PM
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Missouri (Hard by the Elk Fork of the Salt River)
Posts: 221

4/12 pitch is too much for me and the ironworkers that put the tin on my shop. They were slipping and sliding and cussing up a blue streak! I am starting a horse barn and will go with 2/12 as I will be the one to put the tin on this one! I cut the cedar poles a year ago. I have quite a bit of lumber in storage from the shop construction. The floor will be dirt/lime waste. The only real out of pocket stuff will be the trusses and the tin. I will have to trench about 75 feet for electric and water lines. I lived in the city for 50 years and I refuse to have overhead electric lines. Everything we do is underground.

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  #17  
Old 08/17/06, 03:38 PM
Who...me?
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Owen Co., Indiana
Posts: 278

Having the poles down the middle makes things more effective. Smaller lumber to make the spans.

Socketsystem seems pretty good, although I'd have to go over the numbers and compare cost. If you look at trusses there isn't a whole lot holding them together. I don't see why the socket thingys couldn't work.

Wouldn't want a completely open system though. Too much volume to heat and I want at least some storage above. Would end up adding cost to put in a ceiling.

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  #18  
Old 08/18/06, 05:10 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: South Central VA
Posts: 19
To longshadowfarms
That is a beautiful barn. I like the gambrel roof. Your barn is close to the design that I was looking to build.




Tim
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Last edited by ringtb; 08/18/06 at 06:27 AM.
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  #19  
Old 08/18/06, 07:45 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Georgia
Posts: 172

Might want to look at this.

http://www.diypolebarns.com/

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