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  #1  
Old 07/22/06, 08:53 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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Getting Rid of Multifloral Rose

Does anyone know of a good way to rid pastures of multifloral rose? I have about 8 acres pastured for my horses so it would have to be something safe to use around them. Thanks in advance.

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  #2  
Old 07/22/06, 09:14 PM
farmer11
 
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I had someone tell me that goats would get rid of it but it might take awhile

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  #3  
Old 07/22/06, 09:18 PM
 
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herbicide named crossbow, the animals should not have to be removed unless you have one you milk for human consumption. It may take more than on application but you can spot spray. I use this product on my pastures, it works and will not kill grass.

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  #4  
Old 07/22/06, 09:27 PM
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I have read that a bulldozer is the most effective means of removing the multi-flora.

Don't know if that's true or not, but it's what I read.

Pony!
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  #5  
Old 07/22/06, 09:34 PM
 
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I second goats. goats love it and make good companions for horses.

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  #6  
Old 07/22/06, 09:38 PM
 
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here i am again with my pitch for 2-4-d, again, at 64% a gallon cost $17.00 bucks and will mix over a hundred gallons of broadleaf killer.

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  #7  
Old 07/22/06, 09:44 PM
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Goats!! They adore it and will ignore all grass if they can get to the multiflora roses......

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  #8  
Old 07/22/06, 09:57 PM
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if i remember what i was told from years back, my dad once plowed one of the fields that had once had multi-flora and was cut back. there were runners underground twenty to thirty feet in length. that is probably why it is so hard to totally exterminate. i don't know if the chemical applications would kill that much root or not.

i may have been one of the folks who recommended goats. they would be comparable to cutting it down and mowing. if you get rid of the mature plants and and keep it mowed or grazed down, you can keep it in check. i doubt you will ever totally eliminate it. my field has been totally cleared and mowed several times. if i neglect it, even for half a season, it always comes back.

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  #9  
Old 07/22/06, 09:59 PM
 
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Burn it off. That way the roots have to try and make new growth. It might take 2-3 times to do it though..

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  #10  
Old 07/22/06, 10:01 PM
 
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What is Multifloral Rose? Is it harmful to horses?

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  #11  
Old 07/22/06, 10:24 PM
 
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Think BIG large growths of roses, And the thorns too. It can crowd out other vegitation.

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  #12  
Old 07/22/06, 10:42 PM
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I'm using Clarity on mine. If you let it get out of hand, you can have a pile of thorny rose briars 15 feet tall.

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  #13  
Old 07/22/06, 10:51 PM
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been there rose...still wearing the tee shirt.

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  #14  
Old 07/22/06, 11:07 PM
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On the plus side, multiflora rose smells *heavenly* in the spring! And it won't hurt horses.

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  #15  
Old 07/23/06, 01:27 AM
 
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Those Roses make good brush shelter for the birds and rabbits too. I heard that if you plant it beside the road when it gets big it will stop a car that is speeding. I'd think it would have to be pretty big to do that tho. We have it beside the house and when I was feeding the birds I found that they would go way into them and sit. In a storm the little birds go in them for protection as well. The many branches would hold the snow and keep off the wind. The birds in the Winter depend on the tiny orange rose hips that grow on them for food. When we had the goats we would find that they used them as a windbreak, laying almost beneath them relaxing on blustery days. Silly things would go there and not into their warm house except at night or if we locked them in. My husband tried everything to get rid of those bushes but nothing worked. I wouldn't allow weedkiller tho. They do have a much needed place in nature.

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  #16  
Old 07/23/06, 06:09 AM
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There are different kinds of multi-flora rose. The kind in south Texas was brought over from Europe by Shanghai Pearce in the later 1800's on an experiment to see if it was suitable for making hedge fences. Like the English Sparrow, it has spread and is a terrible nuisance. You can lose your WHOLE pasture if you let it get out of control.

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  #17  
Old 07/23/06, 06:52 AM
 
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I noticed that every spring there are pink roses growing wild in the fence rows along the dirt road that takes us into town. It only blooms for a short time and only in the fence rows. I wonder if this is the same thing as what you guys are talking about. We've thought about digging some up and planting it on our fence row. After reading this I may not want to.

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  #18  
Old 07/23/06, 07:54 AM
 
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Multiflora rose

It is easier to get rid of AIDS the second time than to get rid of Multiflora Rose at all.

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  #19  
Old 07/23/06, 08:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RLMS
It is easier to get rid of AIDS the second time than to get rid of Multiflora Rose at all.
LOL, we have brush hogged them continously and eventually they die out.
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  #20  
Old 07/23/06, 08:17 AM
 
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DR Brushmower!!!

When we bought our little place, MF Rose was 2o feet or more up into a lot of the trees.
We bought a DR Brushmower, a 15 hp model with a 26in.blade.
It will push it down & chop it up. Does a really nice job.
After I cut it, I go back & sow an orchard grass,timothy, bluegrass, legume mixture. Keep it mowed. It turns into beautiful pasture. Keep it mowed with
a bush hog.
Folks around here mow their pasture occasionally, anyway.
I highly recommend Mowing.
Have fun.

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  #21  
Old 07/23/06, 10:16 AM
 
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You wouldn't believe how fast goats will go through multiflora rose. If you have 8 acres and some of that is pasture, even just 2 adult wethers would make a real dent in the rose in the first year.

They eat more than you'd ever imagine, so be careful about overstocking. Two will go a long way on 8 acres if some of it is pasture.

Lynda

PS - our neigbor did his land like OldJohn did. Our 15 acres (all overgrown briar, brush and woods) were done by an 8 goat and one calf landscaping team. The results on flat or rolling ground are similar, except our neighbor had to work for his and we just watched the goats munch away at things. But on the steep hills, ours are cleared and his still have a load of tasty thorny brush.

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  #22  
Old 07/23/06, 10:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkBat
I noticed that every spring there are pink roses growing wild in the fence rows along the dirt road that takes us into town. It only blooms for a short time and only in the fence rows. I wonder if this is the same thing as what you guys are talking about. We've thought about digging some up and planting it on our fence row. After reading this I may not want to.
The pink roses that are about 1.5 - 2 inches across are wild prarie rose.

Multiflora has little white flowers. It starts blooming in late May in our region and has a wonderful perfumey smell. Unless grazed down, the shrubs get very big and they spread by rooting their canes as they fall over.

Prarie rose is doesn't spread like multiflora does. You don't want to get multiflora started unless you plan on getting goats to eat it up later.

Lynda
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  #23  
Old 07/23/06, 10:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZealYouthGuy
LOL, we have brush hogged them continously and eventually they die out.
Yeah, but goats do the job as well and they are fun and profitable for a homestead!! And you don't have to work so hard.....
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  #24  
Old 07/23/06, 10:57 AM
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My personal opinion is that you don't "Get rid of" MF, you control it. If your neighbors fields (or in your general area) have it then it will keep on coming back.

Mike

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  #25  
Old 07/23/06, 11:08 AM
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It sounds like mesquite. Useful if it is already there, but a bear to get rid of and you sure don't want to plant it if you don't have it already!

I have seen multiflora rose thriving on a desert property where nothing else was growing. This was in NW CO in sagebrush country.

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  #26  
Old 07/23/06, 12:04 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
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In Ohio I used the resident MultiFlora Rose to my advantage.

It makes one heck of a fence if you can control it from spreading into areas you don't want it to.

In the spring and in early September I would deep plow a furrow tight against it to encourage growth where I wanted it but cut off the roots that would try to spread into the pasture.

It would get denser along the edge and pretty much stay out of the fields.

Worked for me.

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  #27  
Old 07/23/06, 12:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RLMS
In Ohio I used the resident MultiFlora Rose to my advantage.

It makes one heck of a fence if you can control it from spreading into areas you don't want it to.

In the spring and in early September I would deep plow a furrow tight against it to encourage growth where I wanted it but cut off the roots that would try to spread into the pasture.

It would get denser along the edge and pretty much stay out of the fields.

Worked for me.
Hey RLMS, do y'all have it up in the Empire???
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  #28  
Old 07/23/06, 12:32 PM
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  #29  
Old 07/23/06, 01:57 PM
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no goatmarm, it is not. Rosa Rugosa has big pink or white single flowers and the hips are large like a cherry tomatoe and very tasty. it is not very invasive. the Multiflora has zillions of clusters of small white flowers, the hips are small, hard and, as far as I know, useless. The birds eat them and plant the seeds everywhere you don't want them. I wish I could contain them in a fencerow. So far our goats are not interested. (They want to hang around and try to get the chickens feed).

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  #30  
Old 07/23/06, 01:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lgslgs
The pink roses that are about 1.5 - 2 inches across are wild prarie rose.

Multiflora has little white flowers. It starts blooming in late May in our region and has a wonderful perfumey smell. Unless grazed down, the shrubs get very big and they spread by rooting their canes as they fall over.

Prarie rose is doesn't spread like multiflora does. You don't want to get multiflora started unless you plan on getting goats to eat it up later.

Lynda
Thank you so much for your answer. That cleared it up for me.
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