What kind of corn is used in making the corn nut snack that you can buy in the store? - Homesteading Today
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  #1  
Old 10/25/05, 05:48 AM
r.h. in okla.
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What kind of corn is used in making the corn nut snack that you can buy in the store?

I'm trying to make my own version of corn nut snacks only I'm using dried sweet corn. So far I've had them soaking in salt water for almost 24 hours and they don't seem to be swelling very much. I'm wondering if I put too much salt in the water. I am going to go ahead and bake them this morning to see what happens. Maybe tommorrow I will make some using the corn that Ken gave us. I figured that the corn used to make the corn nut snack is probably the big hominy corn. Am I right that it is hominy?

Anyone else ever try to make their own corn nut snacks?

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Old 10/25/05, 06:45 AM
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According to Kurt Saxton, they use Hickory King.

http://www.kurtsaxon.com/foods009.htm

A lot of stuff I've read said to use sweet corn, but it really does not have that good 'corn' flavor and doesn't have the big floury kernals you want.

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Old 10/25/05, 08:48 AM
 
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He's absolutely right - Hickory King. It's an old heirloom variety. My grandfather used to grow it. Years ago Gurney sold it but not anymore. I would try a couple of the big heirloom seed companies. They are your best bet. Try www.heirloomseeds.com and there's another one that I can't find right now. I THINK it's www.rareseeds.com but I may be wrong. Seedsavers can possibly point you in the right direction. Obviously it is still be grown commercially somewhere so some company is selling the seed in quantity. You might also check with Stokes out of Canada if you don't get any results in the heirloom searches.
BW

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Old 10/25/05, 09:01 AM
dlangland
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyngbaeld
According to Kurt Saxton, they use Hickory King.

http://www.kurtsaxon.com/foods009.htm

A lot of stuff I've read said to use sweet corn, but it really does not have that good 'corn' flavor and doesn't have the big floury kernals you want.
I have used dried sweet corn for years to make munchy snacks, but you are correct. It's not the same but unique it's it own right, and fairly nutritious. Smaller kernals, different texture...I need to write this other variety down. Deb
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Old 10/25/05, 10:35 AM
r.h. in okla.
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Well I baked them this morning and they turned out great. They don't have quit as much flavor as the ones you buy in the store but they may add artificial flavoring. My daughters tried them and they just loved them. My youngest daughter kept going back for more. I thought she was going to be late for the school bus. My oldest one made me promise not to eat em all so she could have more to eat when they get home this evening.

This was sweet corn that was either sucker ears or missed when picking from my big sweet corn patch. At the end of the summer season I picked and hulled them out thinking I might get some chickens to feed them to, but now that we know how to make a snack with them, we will be eating them ourselves.

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Old 10/25/05, 03:25 PM
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Would you mind sharing your technique/recipe?
Thanks!

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Old 10/26/05, 11:28 PM
 
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Just bumping this up in hopes of a recipe! This would be a neat thing to try....

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Old 10/27/05, 07:17 AM
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MAKE YOUR OWN CORN NUTS
by Kurt Saxon

You must be familiar with corn nuts. They are put up in plastic snack bags and are sold in most gas station markets. They cost about 25 cents an ounce and are made from Hickory King Corn, a larger type than feed corn.

The only difference between Hickory King and other varieties is the size. There is no difference in taste. So you can make all the corn nuts you like and be assured they are just as good as the commercial kind and cost next to nothing.

Corn nuts are a variation of parched corn. Indians and pioneers ate parched corn almost as a staple while traveling. It -was very nutritious and took up little space so was considered an excellent trail food.

Parched corn was made by Indians by putting dried corn on hot rocks or in hot coals. You can make parched corn by simply covering the bottom of a greaseless frying pan with corn and stirring until the kernels are uniformly brown.

Corn nuts are a little more refined. As a sample batch, use one cup of whole corn, bought from any feed or health food store. Soak the kernels in two cups of water for three days, in the refrigerator .

Pour off the water and dry the kernels in a towel. Heat up about four cups of grease; bacon, lard, vegetable oil; it doesn't matter. When it is so hot a drop of water sputters on its top, lower a heaping tablespoon of kernels into the middle of the grease. The grease will then begin to boil violently. You have to know how it will react so you won't be tempted to just dump the whole cup in and watch the grease erupt all over the stove.

Make sure any handle to the container is turned toward the back of the stove, especially if you have a child standing by. Also, stand back as an occasional kernel will pop like popcorn.

At first the kernels will sink to the bottom and most will rise to the surface as their moisture departs. When they float to the surface watch until they turn copper brown.

Take out a kernel occasionally, let it cool a minute and chew it. If it's chewey it's not done. When it crunches and shatters it is. Then scoop the browned kernels out onto a piece of newspaper to absorb the grease.

Now you can continue a heaping tablespoonfull at a time and cook them about three minutes or, cautiously and slowly pour the rest of the cup in. After the boiling stops the kernels will rise and simmer on top. But the whole cupful will cause the grease to cool some so the real cooking will take about fifteen minutes.

All you're doing is deep frying them. You can experiment with a shallow frying pan or a deep fat cooker. The result will be the same. With salt, they will be delicious.

Don't use the same grease for more than three or more batches. The heat breaks down its molecules in time -and it can be unhealthful.

You might also try deep fat frying soybeans. They are tasty but not so much as corn nuts. Soybeans need only be soaked overnight. Also, they cook in a shorter time and are lighter than copper brown and do not become exactly crunchy; something between chewy and crunchy. Munchy. Tasty with salt.

Both corn nuts and deep fried soybeans can be mixed for party snack bowls or while watching TV.

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  #9  
Old 10/27/05, 09:34 AM
 
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Thanks a bunch, I am trying it this weekend. Yum!!!!!!!!

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  #10  
Old 10/27/05, 11:40 AM
r.h. in okla.
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What I done to mine was I took 2 cups of sweet corn kernals and soaked them salt water for about 24 hours. I used 1/2 cup salt to 1/2 gallon of water. It might could have stood a little more salt. After soaking I spread them out on a cookie sheet and baked them in the oven at 300 degrees for 30 minutes. Turning them once half way through.

I also found out that 2 cups of kernals doesn't last very long for a family of 5.

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Old 10/27/05, 11:01 PM
 
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Thanks! I'm gonna try that soon....

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